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Books that you love or ones that have changed your life


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Hey guys, I'm stealing this thread idea from SDN but, out of all the books that you've read, are there any ones that you absoloutely love or any books that broke ground for you that you'd like to share?

 

It's the summer now and I think it's an awesome time to pick up a good book and start reading!! *besides reading my MCAT princeton review books that is* :P

 

To start this off:

 

Fiction:

 

  • The Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck (excellent read!!)
  • Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck (highly recommended, it's a short read too)
  • Animal Farm - George Orwell (I love Orwell and dystopian books)
  • The Catcher in the Rye - J.D. Salinger (it's a classic)
  • 1984 - George Orwell (dystopian again)

 

Non-fiction:

 

  • The Man Who Mistook His Wife For a Hat - Dr. Oliver Sacks (assorted tales of patients with neurological impairment)
  • Awakenings - Dr. Oliver Sacks (focuses on post-encephalic Parkinsonian patients, read the book and see the AMAZING MOVIE! rent it!! it has Robin Williams and Robert De Niro!)

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Hey, if you're a big dystopian/utopian fan, you should try: Handmaid's Tale (Atwood) and Brave New World (Huxley). I think lots of us science/med nerds like Brave New World. I'm not much of an Atwood fan in general, but I still think Handmaid's Tale is worth reading.

 

I like lots of 18th/19th/early 20th century literature. Old classics like The Scarlett Letter, Jane Eyre, Gone with the Wind, etc. I love some Shakespeare plays (mostly the tragedies and not the comedies). But I know lots of people don't like old classics.

 

Some more modern stuff: The Great Gatsby, The Incredible Journey, The Hobbit + Lord of the Rings Trilogy, The Stranger (aka L'Etranger), The Little Prince (aka Le Petit Prince), Angela's Ashes.

 

Some books for young people: Huckleberry Finn, Tom Sawyer, Harry Potter :) .

 

I'm a major Romantic poetry fan - Coleridge's Rime of the Ancient Mariner (you've got to read this outloud - it very much follows the oral tradition), Keat's Ode's (Nightingale, Grecian Urn, etc.), some Shelley poems, and almost anything Wordsworth.

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I loved "The Firm" by John Grisham... it was amazing.

I love any book by him actually, The Chamber was really good too.

 

The Crucible and Death of a Salesman are pretty much my favourite plays ever, I love Arthur Miller!!!

 

i love john grisham too. He's soo good. best book ever: Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

 

To Kill a Mocking Bird was a good one too

 

O, and i'm sorry to all those lord of the rings fans, but that book was so dry. I couldn't keep my eyes open for more than 5 min. I think i read as much as tom bombadil thing and then just gave up.

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I love Shakes too, even the comedy ones... I was in A Midsummer Night's Dream back in high school, so much fun. I loved The Great Gatsby, it was so awesome.

 

VIP - To Kill a Mockingbird is a great book!

 

I'm reading "Great Expectations" right now, well, I was but will finish it when exams end!

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i love john grisham too. He's soo good. best book ever: Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

 

To Kill a Mocking Bird was a good one too

 

O, and i'm sorry to all those lord of the rings fans, but that book was so dry. I couldn't keep my eyes open for more than 5 min. I think i read as much as tom bombadil thing and then just gave up.

 

To Kill a Mocking Bird was okay. But I think analyzing it to death for 3 months in English class killed it for me. Same thing with Lord of the Flies.

 

With LOTR, you have to read it quickly the first time. It's got lots of beautiful descriptive passages, but if you read them too slowly then you'll get bogged down. The trick is to skip anything that's too descriptive and go back to them later :)

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To Kill a Mocking Bird was okay. But I think analyzing it to death for 3 months in English class killed it for me. Same thing with Lord of the Flies.

 

With LOTR, you have to read it quickly the first time. It's got lots of beautiful descriptive passages, but if you read them too slowly then you'll get bogged down. The trick is to skip anything that's too descriptive and go back to them later :)

 

Yeah, so much description at the start... I got so bored! lol

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Smurfette, Brave New World is at the very top of my reading list for this summer :-) I've been meaning to read it for YEARS now.....:eek: I will also add a Handmaid's Tale, a couple of people have recommended it to me lately...ditto with Le Petit Prince!

 

Agreed that To Kill a Mockingbird was excellent and lol like everyone here, I read the first book and gave up halfway through the second in LOTR!

 

Lord of the Flies was also a fav of mine :-) And did I forget to add my all time favs? "Touch and Feel Farm" (the chick was so soft!) and the Rainbow Fish! :P

 

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I really enjoyed a book I read about a month ago. Wasn't really life changing or anything like that, but extremely informative and I believe entirely accurate.

 

Race Against Time by Stephen Lewis. It is part of the CBC Massey Lectures Series.

 

Stephen Lewis is awesome :-) He gave a presentation and lecture for an event my dad attended and he found it incredible. I tried to book him for my model UN but he's booked for years in advance!

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hmm i like"The Monk who sold his ferrari" by Robin Sharma,

Saint, surfer, CEO is also good by him

- Right now i am reading "The Final Exam"..its is areally good realistic book so far

- I likes Sidney Sheldon books- Like "Tell me your dreams"

- Other than that..i like to read more spiritual and philosophy books lol..I have "Autobiography of a yogi" to read...

- A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry is good too:)

 

Hopefully i will have time apart from MCAT business, work etc

 

Good thread to start btw:D

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best book ever: Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy .

 

I agree, that's the best book ever written without a doubt! Also awsome : Last chance to see (same author but non fiction stories about endangered species, just as hilarious despites the sad topic). Everything else by Douglas Adams is also in my tops.

 

Oh, and don't forget comics! Calvin & Hobbes! (they're the best when you've been studying complicated stuff all day :) )

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I don't think there's been a book that "changed my life," but here are some I read recently and enjoyed:

 

"20-something stories by 20-something writers"

"Prep" (I went to an East Coast private school, so I could relate)

"Black like me"

 

 

I've stocked up on a bunch of books here in the States, can't wait to read them all. I literally read nothing but magazines during my MCAT prep.

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My ultimate fiction fav is always going to be Pride & Prejudice, closely followed by To Kill A Mockingbird. And my non fiction fav is The End Of Education, which I seriously recommend everyone read, especially educators – it’s insightful yet to the point and perfect for the opinionated as well. While the book I am still working on (for the past three years), and I hope to finish before I die, is War & Peace. It is actually quite good so far but I never have time to read it, and because I hate reading novels in intervals, I pretty much start from the beginning each time.

 

I love reading as it gets you away from one's reality, however actually shows you what the reality is in many cases; which I guess is why I continue to take lit classes every semester cuz I have to make time for reading. Even though the classes tend to be with profs that insist your opinion is wrong because your interpretation of feelings in the story is not the same as theirs, and of course I love asking them how do they know what the author was “feeling” when she/he wrote it.:rolleyes:

 

Each book that I’ve read probably changed my life in some way or other, like at a young age they most likely taught me to always look at the other side of a person or situation before jumping to conclusions; which I think is a trait many still have yet to master – not making assumptions that is.:)

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A Fine Balance - Rohinton Mistry (heart-wrenching fiction of life in India)

 

The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien (may have something to do with why I love caving)

 

Satanic Verses - Salman Rushdie

 

Under the Banner of Heaven - John Krakauer (true story about the rise of the Mormon church)

 

Touching the Void - Joe Simpson (incredible story of survival due to an amazing will to live)

 

A Tale of Two Cities - Charles ****ens

 

OK thats just ****ing rediculous! I can't even right ****ens! DIC|<ENS

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Hey, if you're a big dystopian/utopian fan, you should try: Handmaid's Tale (Atwood) and Brave New World (Huxley). I think lots of us science/med nerds like Brave New World. I'm not much of an Atwood fan in general, but I still think Handmaid's Tale is worth reading.

 

Smurfette, we share similar tastes =). Although I'm not a fan of Atwood's attempts at dystopian novels, Handmaid's tale was mediocre. An absolutely fantastic dystopian novel that is always overlooked although it sets many precedents for the theme is "We" by Yevgeny Zamyatin. Wicked read.

 

Also "The Trial" by Kafka and "The Hunchback of Notre-Dame" by Hugo are great novels. The former is really depressing and caused some angst within me towards the legal system. Also "Crime and Punishment" by Dostoyevski.

I also just picked up Père Goriot by Balzac, its also supposed to be good. I'm a big fan of the classics (Penguin classics, Bantam classics etc).

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"Lord of the Flies" - William Golding

- Analyzing this book basically defined my Grade 10 and I don't think whoever reads it ever actually forgets it.

 

"Animal Farm" - George Orwell

 

"One day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich" - Alexander Solzhenitsyn

- I swear I was ACTUALLY at a prison camp while reading this book. So interesting, I was kinda sad when I was done! I read it twice!

 

 

There's alot of others that I read in highschool can' remember.

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Smurfette, we share similar tastes =). Although I'm not a fan of Atwood's attempts at dystopian novels, Handmaid's tale was mediocre. An absolutely fantastic dystopian novel that is always overlooked although it sets many precedents for the theme is "We" by Yevgeny Zamyatin. Wicked read.

 

Also "The Trial" by Kafka and "The Hunchback of Notre-Dame" by Hugo are great novels. The former is really depressing and caused some angst within me towards the legal system. Also "Crime and Punishment" by Dostoyevski.

I also just picked up Père Goriot by Balzac, its also supposed to be good. I'm a big fan of the classics (Penguin classics, Bantam classics etc).

 

Yay! I love how there's so many fellow bookworms out here! Ah yes, Crime and Punishment! I should go back and read that. I think I was too young when I tried reading it (grade 8?) and I didn't really understand a lot of the story. Kafka's Metamorphosis is good too, of course. Haven't read "The Trial" though.

 

Lost: I've been meaning to read The Brother's Karmazov but I haven't yet.

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