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Volunteer Hours?


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How many volunteer hours are needed when applying to medical school to be considered competitive for application to Canadian schools? I know that for the DVM you need at least 3,000 hours of volunteer work to be considered on your application.

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There are no fixed hours. Some applicants have very little while some have quite a bit. As well, with most Canadian schools you only provide the location and the start/end dates, not the weekly hourly commitment. Don't worry about making a hours quota, just volunteer where you'll have fun and gain experience.

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That sounds a little over the top. 3000 hours? That's 5 years of volunteering for 2 hours 6 days of the week. Where did you hear that?

 

Some schools I heard require like that in the States. Usually over 500-1000 in diversified practice is enough...but thats for the DVM. Im just wondering if med schools equally way volunteer work/background info the same way a dvm program does. Lol there is that saying that vet students do much more work than med students :D

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lol, my bf who is in his 3rd year of vet school keeps on insisting that it was harded to prep to get into vet school than med. I keep on telling him it was just -different- and not -more- but he's bristly on the issue. So, naturally, I keep on poking at it ^^

 

Actually, I HAVE heard that vet school is harder to get into than med (in Canada, that is) - and it wasn't from a prevet person, which makes the info more plausible.

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I'm not sure if you can distinctly correlate applicants and admission rate with competitiveness. You'ld have to look at gpa's and other area's (EC's, volunteering etc.) AND how they are assessed by the school. I was taking a brief glance at a pharmacy school admission rate and they had 298 applicants, 50 accepted with gpa between 3.9-4.5. This shows a much greater competitiveness than medschool. The gpa weighting however is 70% which is markedly higher than any medschool would consider, so it makes sense that they would have such a gpa range. You would also have to look at the other applicants who are applying. In general i think its hard to really say another profession is more competitive without basically going through both processes. It may also depend highly on the individual's situation, if someone had a great 1st year they may stand a better chance at pharmacy than risk getting bad marks in 2nd and 3rd year. Vice versa: if someone had a bad 1st year, but brought up their 2nd and 3rd year, they could easily have a greater chance at medschool than pharmacy.

 

I think in general terms however, there seems to be a trend or atleast general idea (even if admission statistics don't agree) of med > dent > vet > pharm. You can see this when ppl back up plans of medschool with dent or whatever with rarely the other way around. As one might quickly notice, it unfortunately seems to be, the more money/lifestyle you make in the profession, the more competitive it becomes. This is seen in residencies too, as Ian pointed out with competitive CaRMS matching.

 

Whatever the case may be, I'll continue to stroke my own ego and maintain that meds is the most competitive :D

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Competitiveness of each professional program is also strongly dependent on geographic origin too. For example, in NL, we only have 2 vet spots at UPEI, but we have 40 medical school spots. Therefore, getting into veterinary medicine from the province is notoriously difficult.

 

I'm still trying to decide what selection process I like more for professional programs, the approach I've seen in medicine or approach I've seen in engineering. Do you heavily screen applicants and select only as many as needed, thereby betting that you have picked the best ones (like medicine)? Or, do you let a large number in and make the program so difficult that you fail out >50% of the class in the first few years (like engineering), which is expensive and time consuming. Both have advantages and disadvantages, and I've seen people from almost every profession advocate one over the other, but I've never really seen a consensus on it.

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I think in general terms however, there seems to be a trend or atleast general idea (even if admission statistics don't agree) of med > dent > vet > pharm. You can see this when ppl back up plans of medschool with dent or whatever with rarely the other way around.

 

This conclusion was based on what?? :confused:

I happen to know people who have backed up vet school with medicine. Vet school is tough to get into because as someone has pointed out there are very few spots compared to med schools. And while you can apply to med school accross the country, this isn`t true for vet schools.

 

I don`t really see the point in arguing competitiveness of various programs or why it should even play on your ego. People should just be happy when they get into the program they want.

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This conclusion was based on what?? :confused:

 

this is based on a general trend that you notice. Go up to a random premed or general student at a campus or even a guy on a street. I bet they'll say that med is the most competitive. There will be different opinions but i think there will be a major group that would give you that breakdown.

 

I happen to know people who have backed up vet school with medicine. Vet school is tough to get into because as someone has pointed out there are very few spots compared to med schools. And while you can apply to med school accross the country, this isn`t true for vet schools.

 

In my post i said that you can't just look at #ppl applying vs. #ppl accepted as there are other factors altho yes this is a major factor. And I didn't actually say med>vet, I said there is a general idea that ppl might think that med>vet. Altho i don't have any statistics infront of me, I would think there are more ppl backing up med with vet than vet with med.

 

I don`t really see the point in arguing competitiveness of various programs or why it should even play on your ego. People should just be happy when they get into the program they want.

 

relax, it was a joke. Obviously people aren't going to pick a program because of how competitive it is, or if they do, they're making a big mistake.

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What's difficult or not highly depends on the particular individual. I'm sure I wouldn't be competitive for vet school, seeing as I don't have any volunteering that involves agriculture, pets, or wildlife of any sort. I'm probably not all that competitive for education either (unless I go back and redo a bunch of courses) because I'm in a program that doesn't cater well to education. I also don't have the breadth of upper level courses that they like to see because I took lots of electives that relate to my program. However, I think I'm somewhat competitive for med, given my GPA, MCAT, and particular EC's

 

I have friends who's dream is vet school - many of them wouldn't be competitive for med because that's not what they wanted to do, so their experiences don't make sense for med.

 

Having said all this, it doesn't really seem to make a whole lot of sense to compare the competitiveness of programs. It only really makes sense to try to be competitive for the program(s) that you're interested in.

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I think you can compare on the basis of if someone really wanted to get into that school and they tried really hard to do be competitive for that school, would it be easier to get in vet vs. dental vs. med etc.

 

It depends on the individual. Someone who is very good at getting high marks will fare very well to get into pharmacy, but if they don't enjoy doing EC's or don't perform well at interviews they would have trouble getting into med. If someone grew up on a farm and has worked with animals all their life, they might find it easier to get into vet school compared to dental school. Many med schools have policies that allow weighting formulas or "best 2 years" or "last 2 years", so someone who did poorly in 1st year, but well in years 2-4 might have a good chance of getting into med, but not such a great chance at say pharmacy. And so on and so forth...

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Smurfette, you seem to be forgetting about the basic law of supply and demand. Specialties with a low supply of placements and in high demand by MD grads will be more competitive. Of individual talents factor in to this as well, as you mentioned.

 

I don't know in CARMS releases matching stats to the general public but the answer to "what are competitive specialties?" would be those specialties that have the most people applying to the fewest placements. So there may be specialties that are very demanding and require top-calibre students but they are less competitive because nobody wants them. I think I read on this board somewhere than Neurosurgery was like that in Canada. Maybe plastics is not as cerebral (haha no pun inteded:D ) but it is more competitive because more people want to be millionaires who vacuum fat and stuff boobs for a living. I'm jsut guessing at this, I know nothing.

 

Hmm, I seem to have gotten some topics mixed up. Oh well what I said applies to this post as well. If there are more students who want to go to med than Pharmacy and there are the same # of spots then med will be harder to get into, in genereal, but of course, individual talents also factor into the equation.

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