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Steve Jobs and following your heart.


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Okay, I just want to share my thought about this video I saw on youtube. It was a video of Steve Jobs, the guy behind Apple, giving a speech to a graduating class of Stanford University. He was talking about how he dropped out of his college and followed his heart and everything, and it was inspirational for a while,

 

but then, right at the moment when he mentioned that he had started a company worth 4 billion dollar by the time he was thirty and also that he had created Pixar after being fired from Apple,,,, at this moment, it just didn't do it for anymore. I just felt this huge gap between myself and this guy. I started thinking that, although this advice is great for all the "Steve Jobs" out there, what does this mean for the average joes? Is the advice still applicable? My gut feeling is no. I think many of us, if not most, would be better off sticking to the wornout pathways rather than putting oneself out there and doing what the heart wants. Better off economically, socially, and eventually personally as well.

 

Anyway, just my two cents before I call it a night.

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Okay.

 

Steve Jobs isn't the ubermensch. Neither is Bill Gates. They're intelligent people who were ambitious and got very, very, very lucky. Tens of thousands of people who are just as ambitious and just as intelligent will not be nearly as lucky, but this does not make them titans.

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This is selection bias: they only select the mold-breaking heart-followers who succeed to give these speeches. You don't hear from the amazing musicians who made a career out of music but always lived below the poverty line, or the business men who went bankrupt over and over again.

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Okay.

 

Steve Jobs isn't the ubermensch. Neither is Bill Gates. They're intelligent people who were ambitious and got very, very, very lucky. Tens of thousands of people who are just as ambitious and just as intelligent will not be nearly as lucky, but this does not make them titans.

 

You've gotta give them a lot more credit than that. True, there's an element of luck but in the 1970s, the Operating Systems concept is revolutionary. Otherwise, we'll still be using assembly code commands to get a computer to execute simple tasks. Gates didn't invent it but he was a good businessman and he sold the OS. I heard he volunteered for a presidential campaign and bought tons of buttons for like $0.05 each and sold it later as collecter items for $30 each. Steve Jobs turned around a piece of crap company into one that's worth about $180 a share. Both are billionaires today. Can you do it?

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There are no "Steve Jobs", there is a Steve Jobs.

 

There are no "People like me", there is a Me.

 

Following your dreams applies to all of those.

 

I met a man who sells balloons the other day in downtown London, he followed his dreams and inspired me to ace all my exams which I did.

 

Following your dreams, does not imply following Steve Jobs dreams. That is part of his message.

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You've gotta give them a lot more credit than that. True, there's an element of luck but in the 1970s, the Operating Systems concept is revolutionary. Otherwise, we'll still be using assembly code commands to get a computer to execute simple tasks. Gates didn't invent it but he was a good businessman and he sold the OS. I heard he volunteered for a presidential campaign and bought tons of buttons for like $0.05 each and sold it later as a collecter items for $30 each. Steve Jobs turned around a piece of crap company into one that's worth about $180 a share. Both are billionaires today. Can you do it?

 

 

Sure. Given the same opportunities and openings, I could. They are incredibly lucky people. I'm not saying that they lacked ambition, skill, or intelligence. I'm saying that the ambition, skill, and intelligence they had would have been nothing without a serious helping of luck alongside it. For every Gates, there are 1000 businessmen who are equally smart, skilled and motivated, but simply lack the same lucky breaks.

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Sure. Given the same opportunities and openings, I could. They are incredibly lucky people. I'm not saying that they lacked ambition, skill, or intelligence. I'm saying that the ambition, skill, and intelligence they had would have been nothing without a serious helping of luck alongside it. For every Gates, there are 1000 businessmen who are equally smart, skilled and motivated, but simply lack the same lucky breaks.

 

I agree with you, a lot of businessmen/women are intelligent, talented and enormously fortunate but people like Bill Gates and the Google inventors have more than these assets. They have a vision of the future 10-20 years from now. People made fun of Gates in the 1970s for coming up with the idea of a desktop in every household and critics ridiculed Page and Brin and declared search engines will never, ever make money.

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Again, that's super. But at the end of the day, what Page and Brin did is no different from what a thousand other bright people have done before them - they took a chance on an idea. In their cases, they got lucky that the market was ready for their idea. Ditto for Gates.

 

I have no issues with respecting these people for their great successes. I have a problem with turning them into gods. We have a bad habit of idolizing people who earn a lot of money, when they don't deserve to be idolized. I guess that's what happens in the pseudo-meritocracy we live in - we equate money with respect. People with lots of money deserve all of our respect, and people with little deserve none of it. Yet, Steve Jobs is no different than you or I. He saw an opportunity, he seized it, and it panned out very nicely for him. To say that what he did is unaccomplishable by most the people on this forum is wrong. Don't forget that Jobs is the same man who was removed from the company in the 1980s because he managed poorly enough to warrant it.

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So after noticing this forum I was reading an article today totally unrelated about the LSD culture of the 60s and 70s and at the end it told me an interesting fact about Steve Jobs that I thought I'd share.:

 

"It is through technology, not despite it, that LSD visions were realized. Leary called the personal computer “the LSD of the 1990s.” And in a 2006 report in Wired magazine, many early computer pioneers are said to have been users of LSD. Steve Jobs, Apple’s presiding genius, described his own LSD experience as “one of the two or three most important things” he has done in his life. So here it is — a world in which we all do more than just inhale. It is through the iPod that, in Leary’s once contentious words, we turn on, tune in and drop out."

 

So yes Steve Jobs did follow his dreams which I think is solid advice to a point but he was also very adventurous and probably took a lot of risks along the way. His adventures worked out for him though it's true not everyone will be as lucky. I personally believe in following your heart while taking reality into consideration. Regrets occur when you ignore what your heart is telling you. So maybe deciding to become an artist as opposed to a doctor may not make you a multi-millionnaire but you did what made you happy and that's all that matters in the end. I don't think success from following your intuition should be measured by the amount of fame or money you have but by how happy you are at the end of the day.

 

That being said, I don't reccommend dropping out of university and dropping a bunch of acid. Luck is not in everyone's favour so in following your heart make sure you have a relatively safe back up plan to get you back on your feet when the going gets tough.

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That being said, I don't reccommend dropping out of university and dropping a bunch of acid. Luck is not in everyone's favour so in following your heart make sure you have a relatively safe back up plan to get you back on your feet when the going gets tough.

Reply With

Wuss.

 

Haha, kidding. I don't think it's alright to define "Success" or "good life" for anyone else though. So maybe dropping a bunch of acid and out of university maybe someone's dream and that alright, since it doesn't harm me.

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