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8 mins for MMI answers


ladyluck08

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In an MMI interview there is no traditional "communication" between the interviewer and the interviewee. The interviewee (you) is expected to be able to speak for the entire 8 minutes. That being said, there are usually 2-5 "prompting questions" that the interviewer can use if you have finished speaking and time remains. Sometimes you may feel that you have already answered these questions, other times they will be new perspectives on the main question. The prompting questions are a set of specific questions, they are not generated by the interviewer based on your earlier response.

 

Hope that helps.

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Technically it is best to be able to answer the question completely and thoroughly by using the entire 8 minutes, however you should make sure you are not rambling and repeating yourself. It is better to take the prompting questions than to lose the focus of your response. Sometimes a question simply won't have enough content to actually answer it for the entire 8 minutes.

 

The kind of questions used in the prompts really depend on the question. They may be simple like "Why do you think the patient is feeling this way in this scenario?" or they may introduce alternative information such as "What would you do differently if the person in this scenario was a family friend?" etc etc.

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Don't worry too much about "filling up" your 8 minutes. Keeping talking if you have something to say, stop if you're done. Plus, I've found the interviewers will tend to give you very clear signs - they'll interrupt you if they feel they want to ask a prompting question, or they'll say something such as, "do you have anything you want to add?"

 

It is better not to go in determined to fill up the eight minutes. For example, if the scenario involves you making some sort of simple choice, the prompts might be designed to see how well you stick to that choice. (E.g. Your answer is a "no" (simple, right?), and the interviewer might ask, "well, what if your family doesn't approve?" or "what if the other person got angry?") If you don't leave room for flexibility, you might find that you're scrambling to defend a relatively simple choice for eight minutes straight and not let the interviewer get a word in edgewise.

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