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Minimum AQ/NAQ for interview?


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what is that out of? 40?

 

i believe the total is out of 50- 25 for aq and 25 for naq.

 

anything over an 85% average will get you a full 25 for aq. another thread has the formula to find out what your aq score will be. nobody really knows how they score the naq... but people usually get rocked in that one.

 

an oop needs to be above 40 for an interview (from what i remember reading).

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dont forget that they are changing the way they calculate AQ and they epect many people to have lower aq score thus it is possible that the score needed for interview might be lower

 

How is that possible? They boosted the minimum requirement from 70% to 75% for in province and to 80% for oop. Shouldn't that mean that the AQ score will be higher?

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well if aq scores go down across the board, they still need ~600 people for interviews so the score might actually have to be lowered to get those 600 or so people.

I haven't confirmed this so don't take my word for it, but I have a feeling that the overall score for what gets an interview will vary each year... in that they evaluate all applications and then look at the number of people above 35- if it equals the quota that they are looking for then that is the number they will use, if it is too high they will adjust to have more applicants interviewed, if it is too low they will raise it to reduce the number of interviews offered... so, even if they change how AQ/NAQ is calculated it's all relative to other applicants.

 

Also, on the note of changing the minimums from 70% to 75% you are still allowed to apply with a 70%, but they won't do a full review of your file so the chances of you receiving an interview are slim... especially if they don't give you a full review. I also think that this increase will mean that they have fewer applications to go through and will therefore be able to assess each applicant over a longer period of time and be sure that they do qualify for an interview... it sucks for the people below 75% though.

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35, 36 you're safe

 

as i told so many man many applicants or now med students before, AQ is really the only part of the application for which you control your own destiny. Have a solid AQ before venturing onto 'how do i improve my NAQ'

 

Really? I was thinking quite the opposite. By the time the applicant got to the application stage, they've already racked up 4 years of grades so it becomes pretty difficult to raise cumulative grades. Assuming they don't have any glaring deficiency, it would take a lot of work for minimal gain. Plus, there's no guarantee that you'll get 4.0 on all your future courses.

 

It would make sense to keep things in moderation, methinks. The question you should ask is, where can you make the most gain in. If your service category sucks, focus on that. If your last 60 credit GPA sucks, takes some more classes. If you have "no ability to work with others", well go work with others. Prioritize, then go do it.

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I think you misunderstood Destiny's statement. Basically he's saying it's wise to focus on getting that solid GPA in undergrad because like you said, it's pretty damn hard to raise cumulative grades. NAQ, on the other hand, can be improved in a year or two if an applicant becomes heavily involved in volunteering, research, whatever. Sure, people with long-term commitment activities will likely look better, but it's better than having a mediocre GPA that you can't really fix if a boat load of credits has been earned already. I'm in this situation. I have only around 80% so I know I'll always be disadvantageous because NAQ score fluctuates so much every year. I got 19 NAQ score for one year, and 16 the next year, go figure.

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I think you misunderstood Destiny's statement. Basically he's saying it's wise to focus on getting that solid GPA in undergrad because like you said, it's pretty damn hard to raise cumulative grades. NAQ, on the other hand, can be improved in a year or two if an applicant becomes heavily involved in volunteering, research, whatever. Sure, people with long-term commitment activities will likely look better, but it's better than having a mediocre GPA that you can't really fix if a boat load of credits has been earned already. I'm in this situation. I have only around 80% so I know I'll always be disadvantageous because NAQ score fluctuates so much every year. I got 19 NAQ score for one year, and 16 the next year, go figure.

 

Im on the same boat. I had 80% for my first several years and now Im taking an extra year to pull it up. It so damn hard.

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UBC Med always says they do not disclose their grade conversions, but that they use tables provided by UBC enrollment services. I emailed UBC enrollment services and they sent back this:

 

http://www.arts.ubc.ca/students/academic-planning-advising/advising/academicperformance/gpa-equivalency.html

 

Your 3.93 converts to 84.6%. Not quite a full AQ but almost...

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  • 3 weeks later...

So you're saying that some with say a UBC 88% average who received a 25/25 AQ score last year may not receive the same score this year?? :(

dont forget that they are changing the way they calculate AQ and they epect many people to have lower aq score thus it is possible that the score needed for interview might be lower
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So you're saying that some with say a UBC 88% average who received a 25/25 AQ score last year may not receive the same score this year?? :(

doc, remember that if they change the scoring system for aq, naq or the entire application it doesn't just impact you- it impacts everybody... so you should still be fine if you got a perfect 25 last year...

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