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need some level headed advice


nobreath

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Hi guys,

 

So my story.

 

26 years old. Undergrad done. 3.8 GPA first two years, 3.4 GPA last two years. No science prereqs (physics, chemistry, or math). No MCAT, and no idea if I will do well on it (i'm hoping I could if I took a course, studied hard etc). Very good EC's. Currently doing my first year in a MScPT (physiotherapy masters) program.

 

I am confident I can do well grade wise in this masters program, but at the end of the day I feel a medical degree is more of what I want.

 

So what to do from here? Physio is a great backup for sure, and maybe I will end up loving it, but I do not want this to be the reason for continuing with it.

 

Here are my options as I see it:

- Continue on with my masters degree, see how it goes, apply to NOSM and Ireland for Sep 2011, see what happens. Apply to UoT, Western, Mac, NOSM for 2012 with an MCAT, see what happens.

- Withdraw from my masters, take some science prereq's (hopefully doing well... have not taken chemistry for awhile), apply to NOSM and ireland for 2011, and a greater number of domestic schools for 2012, see what happens.

 

I'm in real need of some good advice.

 

Thanks, cheers.

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Not quite sure why you're constraining yourself to such a tight time frame, but if medicine is what you really want, you need to put it as a long term goal. It may take 5 or more years realistically, especially for someone who hasn't done the prereqs, the mcats, and a mediocre GPA (pre-med standards).

 

This is my advice to everyone applying. Even if you are applying every year, treat it as if it's a rejection. Once your applications are sent, think about what you can do to improve on it. Keep yourself busy. Try new things and new activities. Get out into the community and help out. And don't quit things or just cruise along expecting your golden ticket to arrive in the mail in 9 months. I see it far too often when people don't realize how rigorous the standards are for admissions, and how people are shocked when they get a rejection. They get jaded after the first cycle and don't even bother to try again. Others get anxious waiting through the 9 month period, which is understandable because I've gone through it as well. Their anxiety often interferes with their ability to rise to their full potential during that year, and you often accomplish less than what you wanted to have done. End result, you find yourself applying again, yet your application is not much stronger than your last, and you end up right back where you started. Your second application should be vastly stronger than your first, as admissions officers WILL remember your application from the first time, and they will be expecting how you've bettered yourself. Even if that means skipping an application cycle to fulfill it, I think it improves your chances much more.

 

Oh, the oldest in my class started at 45, so don't get too worried about age and need to get in as quickly as you wish.

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Hi guys,

 

So my story.

 

26 years old. Undergrad done. 3.8 GPA first two years, 3.4 GPA last two years. No science prereqs (physics, chemistry, or math). No MCAT, and no idea if I will do well on it (i'm hoping I could if I took a course, studied hard etc). Very good EC's. Currently doing my first year in a MScPT (physiotherapy masters) program.

 

I am confident I can do well grade wise in this masters program, but at the end of the day I feel a medical degree is more of what I want.

 

So what to do from here? Physio is a great backup for sure, and maybe I will end up loving it, but I do not want this to be the reason for continuing with it.

 

Here are my options as I see it:

- Continue on with my masters degree, see how it goes, apply to NOSM and Ireland for Sep 2011, see what happens. Apply to UoT, Western, Mac, NOSM for 2012 with an MCAT, see what happens.

- Withdraw from my masters, take some science prereq's (hopefully doing well... have not taken chemistry for awhile), apply to NOSM and ireland for 2011, and a greater number of domestic schools for 2012, see what happens.

 

I'm in real need of some good advice.

 

Thanks, cheers.

 

you'd be surprised how easy first year chem can be. my friend said that at his university they started with "what is matter" haha. you could stay caught up from there.

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I would finish your MSc.PT then apply.

 

Because if you don't get in, you'll have a job to fall back to pay your debts and you'll be able to do pre-reqs and the MCAT (if it needs to be redone) in your spare time.

 

Do well in your MSc.PT though, your marks may count for some med schools

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You got some realy great advise there. If I were you, I would definitely continue with the Masters as a backup plan, which evertybody needs, while remaining faithful to your dream.

 

Just remember, you are really quite young and over your lifespan, whether you practice as phusician, for 35 years or only for 29 years, you shall have made an awesome contribution, so don 't try to rush it! Time is on your side, prepare yourself well, relatively few get in on the first attempt, one member here tried for 7 consecutive years until acceptance, stay faithful to your dream and goal, become the best candidate you can be, and don't be discouraged by the inevitable detours that hit virtualy all of us on our journey toward medicine. Berst of luck and remember, have perspective!

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those examples are just the near future time frame, i'm sure I would attempt again in 2013

 

as far as the advice with physio as a backup, it is a career that I would enjoy, but I do not need it as a backup to pay off loans etc.. i've got a good job without it (hence some of my concern about continuing with it, if I really want med)

 

great advice, thank you

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You got some realy great advise there. If I were you, I would definitely continue with the Masters as a backup plan, which evertybody needs, while remaining faithful to your dream.

 

Just remember, you are really quite young and over your lifespan, whether you practice as phusician, for 35 years or only for 29 years, you shall have made an awesome contribution, so don 't try to rush it! Time is on your side, prepare yourself well, relatively few get in on the first attempt, one member here tried for 7 consecutive years until acceptance, stay faithful to your dream and goal, become the best candidate you can be, and don't be discouraged by the inevitable detours that hit virtualy all of us on our journey toward medicine. Berst of luck and remember, have perspective!

 

Couldnt he work on his masters while he did some prereqs?

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that would be pretty hard in a professional masters program like physio, most I could get out of the way would be 1 year of gen chem, which I guess would add a few more med school options onto the list like Queens?

 

Not unless you have a physical science prereq too (physics, geology).

 

I think it would make more sense to stick w/ your masters, do really well, then do prereq's after and write the mcat. Or self study for the MCAT and write it sooner, then you'll have some knowledge to do well in your prereqs.

I think though to boost your cGPA, you may need to do a 2nd undergrad (2yrs)

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oh I thought queens was chem not physical science, so what would a year of gen chem help me with anyways? besides mcat prep

 

you really think I would need 2 years to boost my GPA?

 

if that's the case I may as well stick with the MScPT, self study for the MCAT, and take prereq's after if I dont get into calgary, mac, nosm, western, uot...

 

otherwise I could take 1 year upgrade with gen chem and physics, but not sure what more options this would really give me

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As someone has already mentioned, you are putting too rigid of a time constraint on yourself. Step back and realize that you just now want to shift into medicine and are missing all the classes, the MCAT and potentially the ECs required to get in. This will easily take several years to do well. My advice:

 

1. Continue with your Masters

2. Work on your pre-reqs, the MCAT and the ECs

3. In the meantime apply to Calgary and hope for the best.

 

Besides giving you a fallback, the masters will hopefully lock an excellent letter of reference from your supervisor.

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i've been thinking about med for awhile, just haven't got off my ass to do the MCAT or had the opportunity to take chem or physics (well in retrospect I could have fit some of those prereq's in)

 

It is irrelevant. The important point is that you haven't done anything about it till now. Give yourself plenty of time and be realistic or you'll crash and burn and get nowhere.

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Continuing with your MSc.PT will:

a) give you tons of clinical experience and in hospital experience

B) give you research experience

c) give you an extensive knowledge of anatomy and physiology which are important for medicine

 

I think those are good reasons to stay in the program, but you gotta weigh the cons as well:

a) potentially staying an extra year (but I think you'd have to do that anyway since you aren't registered in an undergrad program at the moment)

B) having to explain your decision to switch

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Im not sure an MscPt will make you competitve in two years. Some schools look heavily upon research experience and productivity for medical admissions, which you will surely get very little of, if any. If placed in a graduate student pool (like at UT), you'd probably be at a relative disadvantage compared to if you were just in the undergrad pool.

 

Personally, I think PT is a really bad stepping stone into medicine. However, since you're already in it, I would recommend kicking the crap out of all your classes and making sure you're near the top of the class, to make you competitive.

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i've been thinking about the responses and stuff, i think probably the best course of action for me is to complete this year of the MScPT degree, self study and take the MCAT early in february / early spring, and if I rock it then consider taking a year off and applying to med school, possibly taking some prereq's

 

unfortunately I think if this was 4 months ago my options would be a bit better, i just feel stuck in the PT degree now

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Im not sure an MscPt will make you competitve in two years. Some schools look heavily upon research experience and productivity for medical admissions, which you will surely get very little of, if any. If placed in a graduate student pool (like at UT), you'd probably be at a relative disadvantage compared to if you were just in the undergrad pool.

 

Personally, I think PT is a really bad stepping stone into medicine. However, since you're already in it, I would recommend kicking the crap out of all your classes and making sure you're near the top of the class, to make you competitive.

 

I agree about the lack of productivity in the MSc.PT, but I disagree about it being a bad stepping stone

 

I could be completely wrong, but I'm sure all the medical schools know that you probably won't be published while doing a professional masters degree, but you do get an opportunity at research experience if you want at every PT school (I believe all PT schools either require you to do a thesis or set time for you to do one if you choose). And the clinical experience you get is great (along with the extensive physiology and anatomy you learn)

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