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Would you leave your undergrad unfinished for medical school?


Leon

Would you leave your undergrad unfinished for medical school?  

2 members have voted

  1. 1. Would you leave your undergrad unfinished for medical school?

    • Yes
      54
    • No
      13
    • Other
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Would you accept a seat at a medical school as a third year applicant?

 

It's something I was thinking about recently. If you were offered a position in a medical school as a third year applicant, would you take it? (Let's ignore the paradox that you wouldn't have applied in the first place if you wouldn't accept the seat).

 

I didn't apply as a third yr student due to some complications but I personally dislike the idea of leaving my undergrad unfinished, or having to finish it at a later date. So basically the question can be re written as: Would you leave your undergrad unfinished for medical school?

 

(I'm expecting the vast majority to answer "yes" but I'm more interested in seeing the proportion than say "no.")

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Absolutely. Med school is the goal, the bachelor's is usually a necessary route to that goal. Anybody who is able to get into med school earlier is blessed and that extra year will be used in developing further medical skills.

 

In Quebec, many students enter med school directly from Cegep, i.e., 2 years of college, whcih universitieis in Intario consider to be equivalen to one year of undergrad (considering that h.s. in Que. ends with Gr. 11 and not Gr. 12 as in Ontario).

 

I have a Canadian friend living in the Caribbean who just complete Grade 12 in Ontario and 2 weeks ago, she started medical school at University of the West Indies, UWI. Had she not been accepted there, her Plan B was to study for a B.Sc. in Caanda continuing to try for med school in the Caribbean each year. And if that failed, she would have applied in Canada. She just turned a8 years of age. No B.Sc. and the extra time will advance her skills as a physician.

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Undergrad was the best 4 years of my life.

 

There is no way I would've even considered going to Med after 3 years.

 

One year - is that really going to make a difference in the grand scheme of things? I'll be working as a physician for over 35 years.

 

One year really isn't going to affect my life all that much.

 

But the maturity and experience I gained from finishing an undergrad? That is something that cant' be matched.

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Yeah, this is my dilemma too, apply after 3rd, or wait till finished...

 

It is true that BScs are becoming more useless these days, but I think I'd still like to have the letters for the posterity and future opportunities that might not be related directly to med.

 

One thing I was wondering - I am quite interested in politics, and wouldn't be against being involved in my later years. Wouldn't the 'extra' degree (especially if it were Poli or law) be quite useful to such an endeavour?

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Undergrad was the best 4 years of my life.

 

There is no way I would've even considered going to Med after 3 years.

 

One year - is that really going to make a difference in the grand scheme of things? I'll be working as a physician for over 35 years.

 

One year really isn't going to affect my life all that much.

 

But the maturity and experience I gained from finishing an undergrad? That is something that cant' be matched.

 

couldn't agree with you more. 4th year of my UG was the best year of my life. I was not ready to apply after 2 years UG. Hell I don't think I'm ready to apply now (in M.Sc.)

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Think about it. One year is ALOT. And undergrad is basically worthless anyway. One year could mean you could be either 400,000 richer, could retire one year earlier, etc etc. Besides, if you like medicine, don't you wanna start the "rest of your life" ASAP?

 

The reason why they keep the 4 year Undergrad requirement up is for obvious reasons: They want open-minded students who are mature applying their School, not a bunch of 19 years old kids who have no idea about what they are getting themselves into applying into Medicine because they meet the cut offs.

 

Come to Quebec for 1 year in a Science CEGEP program and look at the students who want Medicine, i can guarantee you that 90% of these students want Medicine not because of the nature of the work, but because the of the paycheck.You'll also see that many of them are extremely immature and ignorant.

 

One year may be a lot, but it definitely makes you "Grow the **** up" like the younger people may say.

People having a completed Bachelor are naturally more mature and more open minded than those who only did Cegep or 2 years of University.

After a Bachelor, your perception of Medicine and graduate studies will change for ever.

 

My case may be an example: I studied Law before entering Medicine and i must say that even though it was not a Science degree, it provided me with the most useful

qualities a Physician needs:

Maturity,Mental Toughness, a team oriented attitude, improved research skills, improved analytical skils, problem-solving mentality, logic oriented choices and more...

 

These qualities indeed made my journey into Medical School a lot smoother and i didn't have to stress for things, since i was prepared.

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I voted yes (even though it's not really applicable to me) but I'm interested in your reason for thinking against it Leon.

 

I never had a first year at uni because they put me straight into second year so while I'm in "third" year now, it's really only my second year of university itself. (Hence why I don't want to apply as a 3rd yr applicant anyway- I would have just one year's worth of GPA and very few ECs and would make a poor application).

 

But my two main reasons for wanting a complete degree:

1) While I want an MD now, I may want other things in the future (eg. MSc, PhD etc...) and I'm quite sure those degrees require a completed BSc.

 

2) There's an independent research project that I'm waiting to do in 4th year (and which I can't do before that year).

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The reason why they keep the 4 year Undergrad requirement up is for obvious reasons: They want open-minded students who are mature applying their School, not a bunch of 19 years old kids who have no idea about what they are getting themselves into applying into Medicine because they meet the cut offs.

 

The interesting thing is that in the UK, you enter into med right after high school and complete your degree (MBBS) in 5 years. It's only in the States, Canada and Aussie that I've heard of the BSc requirement. (though I do agree with you that 3/4 years of undergrad are definitely a valuable asset and experience prior to applying to med)

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One year may be a lot, but it definitely makes you "Grow the **** up" like the younger people may say.

 

My case may be an example: I studied Law before entering Medicine and i must say that even though it was not a Science degree, it provided me with the most useful

qualities a Physician needs:

Maturity,Mental Toughness, a team oriented attitude, improved research skills, improved analytical skils, problem-solving mentality, logic oriented choices and more...

 

These qualities indeed made my journey into Medical School a lot smoother and i didn't have to stress for things, since i was prepared.

 

 

Anesthesiologist,10th year of practice.

Corporate/Litigation Law Attorney for 1 year.

 

 

McGill Medicine Class (M.D.) of 1993.

McGill Law Class (LL.B.)of 1988.

 

 

Uhh, I doubt you're an anesthesiologist in "his 10th year of practice" with an LLB and 1 year as a corporate law attorney... Or else you probably wouldn't be hanging around a pre-med forum suddenly after graduating medschool in 1993 as your signature says, hahah.

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The reason why they keep the 4 year Undergrad requirement up is for obvious reasons: They want open-minded students who are mature applying their School, not a bunch of 19 years old kids who have no idea about what they are getting themselves into applying into Medicine because they meet the cut offs.

 

Come to Quebec for 1 year in a Science CEGEP program and look at the students who want Medicine, i can guarantee you that 90% of these students want Medicine not because of the nature of the work, but because the of the paycheck.You'll also see that many of them are extremely immature and ignorant.

 

The Cegepien med students hold their own quite well compared to those students with bachelor's degrees. And I believe it is the same when they go for licencing.

 

So, it is unfair to tar them with one stroke of the brush. Manyof the CEgep students are highly motivated about medicine, no less so than their brethern with degrees. Same for law by the way. As for maturity, they are forced to mature quickly and do.

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Uhh, I doubt you're an anesthesiologist in "his 10th year of practice" with an LLB and 1 year as a corporate law attorney... Or else you probably wouldn't be hanging around a pre-med forum suddenly after graduating medschool in 1993 as your signature says, hahah.

 

LOL yea when did doctors have time to hang out on a premed forum? jk

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The Cegepien med students hold their own quite well compared to those students with bachelor's degrees. And I believe it is the same when they go for licencing.

 

So, it is unfair to tar them with one stroke of the brush. Manyof the CEgep students are highly motivated about medicine, no less so than their brethern with degrees. Same for law by the way. As for maturity, they are forced to mature quickly and do.

 

I agree that it would be unfair to block access to all Cegep students, but i seriously think the selection process should be more and more rigorous for younger students.

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I never had a first year at uni because they put me straight into second year so while I'm in "third" year now, it's really only my second year of university itself. (Hence why I don't want to apply as a 3rd yr applicant anyway- I would have just one year's worth of GPA and very few ECs and would make a poor application).

 

But my two main reasons for wanting a complete degree:

1) While I want an MD now, I may want other things in the future (eg. MSc, PhD etc...) and I'm quite sure those degrees require a completed BSc.

 

2) There's an independent research project that I'm waiting to do in 4th year (and which I can't do before that year).

 

UofA grants 2nd/3rd year applicants a Bachelor of Medical Science during medical school.. so they get to attend convocation in 3rd year of medical school for the BMedSci, and again upon graduation from medical school. 2nd/3rd year applicants are also not excluded from doing an MD/PhD.

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There's advantages and disadvantages for both ways. But personally, 4th year would be the coolest year to experience and go through. Life would feel unfinished without it.

 

I would probably finish it. It's best for me to finish because there isn't much in my life that I have started AND finished.. this is my chance to do it.

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But if you are applying in your fourth year, how is 4th year the best time of your life? You'd be all stressed about interviews and acceptance. Plus, you'll have to worry about your grades and completing the requirements of your degree.

 

Are you being sarcastic?

 

believe or not, 4th year with all that anxiety of med + cool school courses + many of your friends experiencing the same thing is a blessing. I wouldn't have wanted to miss that part of my life. But w/o knowing all that stuff in my 3rd year I would certainly accept a med school spot in 3rd year. Now looking back, I would probably not have done so.

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Umm, maybe I'm the only who read the question this way, or I just misinterpreted it, but I voted yes. My main reason is that even if I got accepted before, there would be no guarantee I would be accepted again next year, and I would hate to have lost my only chance at med.

 

actually that is what I was thinking. I mean in a competitive application process would you actually turn down an acceptance to complete the degree? Sounds risky :)

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