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my chances at dalhouise


h.u.n.

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I am considering doing a 2 year masters in dalhouise graduate school instead of Toronto. Becoming a resident in Nova Scotia dramatically increases my chances of getting into their medical school... or am I wasting my time... am i at a disadvantage that I lived in ontario almost my whole life.. would this be held against me?

 

Dalhouse medical school looks at GPA, MCAT, statement, autobiography etc... but does anyone know how much weight is given in each section... for instance, 40% for GPA? Ive read on someones thread some kind of breakdown.. but i cant find anything on their website, and when i call them they seem to not answer my question directly.

 

Thank I would appreciate some advice :)

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hey, my message was not clear. I am applying to dalhouise graduate school in order to become a resident, this way my chances of getting into their medical school increases... but im not sure if this is worth it... i could do a UFT masters. I know most ontario medical schools do not give preference to ontario residents, but i feel i would be at a great disadvantage if i give up my ontario residency.. and than apply to ontario medical schools from nova scotia.

 

i know the breakdown formula, but when i ask the admissions office the worth in each category, they keep telling me that information is not disclosed?

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-Doing a research-based Masters will get you NS residency status; they consider grad school full-time work.

 

-It is worth it if you think that your chances at Dal as a maritimer are stronger than they would be anywhere else, or if you have a particular affinity for the maritimes.

 

-The breakdown is listed in many threads here. doc2B has posted it several times.

 

edit: Also, "giving up" your ontario residency wouldn't hurt that much... Unless you're SWOMEN, or from the ottawa area, and even then your edge is only pre-interview. The difference in wGPA between ottawa area and OOP is significant, but if you meet ottawa's wGPA cutoffs, and are in decent shape for Western's non-SWOMEN cutoffs, not being an ontario resident doesn't hurt your chances in Ontario much I don't think...

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While your chances would be improved, ask yourself... are you willing to give up an application cycle (because you can't apply while in grad school) and live in Halifax for 2 years (minimum... remember that not everyone finishes a Masters in 2 years) just to increase your odds of being accepted to 35%? While you do have a better shot, and Dal's application weighting lends itself nicely to Grad students... this should not factor into your decision for your grad school.

 

People out here can sniff out students like that from a mile away... there is a reason that Dal gives such a strong preference to those from the Maritimes... because they expect their graduates to stay in the Maritimes...

 

Finally, grad school can be an amazing experience, but if you're only in it for the med school shot... it can be a terrible experience

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If you want to play around with your residency status and REALLY increase your chances at being accepted, move to NB, become fluent in french, and apply to U de M and DMNB. Odds are in your favor if you do that, as I'd say that there is a greater than 50% acceptance rate if you can apply to both schools.

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If you want to play around with your residency status and REALLY increase your chances at being accepted, move to NB, become fluent in french, and apply to U de M and DMNB. Odds are in your favor if you do that, as I'd say that there is a greater than 50% acceptance rate if you can apply to both schools.

 

U de M AND DMNB? Med school at U de M?? Huh?? Or is DMNB hosted at U de M...?

 

edit: Google FTW. I assume you're referring to the program offered through Sherbrooke? Interesting. I speak french very fluently (bilingual) and have family in NB. I want meds bad enough that if this year doesn't work out, I would consider a move to NB or NS just to work for a year just so I could get into meds.

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You might have to do your masters at U de M. One of my classmates this year at DMNB is a francophone, but because he did his undergrad at an English speaking school, he was not eligible for the Sherbrooke related francophone seats. I'm not sure how many seats there are at NB, but the 30 anglophone and however many francophone would really make things a possibility for you.

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..hey thanks for your reply... im in my 4th year of uni... this February I am applying to graduate school, I am also writing my MCATS this summer (2011)... the next cycle to apply for medical school is October (2011), which means either I accept my masters (if i get it) and not be an eligible applicant to most medical schools in canada until i finish, or i apply to medical school (october 2011) and wait...if i dont get in the first time, I would regret not accepting a masters program.

 

Now im not doing a masters just for medical school, I do enjoy research, I have been involved in 3 projects since second year of university (thesis and independent projects). So my concern is #1 should I even bother doing a masters when i haven't even applied to medical school #2 if i get in and accept graduate school, should I do it at Dalhouise? b/c it will give me residency and my chances as a resident is 35% which is much higher than any medical school in Ontario. Most schools in ontario dont give preference to Ontario residents. #3 will the medical school committee just see this strategy, not buy it and than I am totally at a disadvantage?

 

I think 35% is pretty high, compared to most schools. dont you think?

 

THANKS

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While your chances would be improved, ask yourself... are you willing to give up an application cycle (because you can't apply while in grad school) and live in Halifax for 2 years (minimum... remember that not everyone finishes a Masters in 2 years) just to increase your odds of being accepted to 35%? While you do have a better shot, and Dal's application weighting lends itself nicely to Grad students... this should not factor into your decision for your grad school.

 

People out here can sniff out students like that from a mile away... there is a reason that Dal gives such a strong preference to those from the Maritimes... because they expect their graduates to stay in the Maritimes...

 

Finally, grad school can be an amazing experience, but if you're only in it for the med school shot... it can be a terrible experience

 

 

..hey thanks for your reply... im in my 4th year of uni... this February I am applying to graduate school, I am also writing my MCATS this summer (2011)... the next cycle to apply for medical school is October (2011), which means either I accept my masters (if i get it) and not be an eligible applicant to most medical schools in canada until i finish, or i apply to medical school (october 2011) and wait...if i dont get in the first time, I would regret not accepting a masters program.

 

Now im not doing a masters just for medical school, I do enjoy research, I have been involved in 3 projects since second year of university (thesis and independent projects). So my concern is #1 should I even bother doing a masters when i haven't even applied to medical school #2 if i get in and accept graduate school, should I do it at Dalhouise? b/c it will give me residency and my chances as a resident is 35% which is much higher than any medical school in Ontario. Most schools in ontario dont give preference to Ontario residents. #3 will the medical school committee just see this strategy, not buy it and than I am totally at a disadvantage?

 

I think 35% is pretty high, compared to most schools. dont you think?

 

THANKS

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You should read the fine print. Living in NS for X amount of time as a resident does NOT confer Maritime residency.

 

Can you find me this "fine print"?? Everyone I've spoken to at Dal says that living in the maritimes for one year while working (research MSc counts as work) immediately prior to application DOES confer maritime residency. If this is not in fact the case I've been directly lied to by some admissions people.

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gb35 is right...doing a MSc at Dalhousie does give you maritime applicant status for medical school applications :)

 

I'm from Ontario and did all my undergrad in Ontario but came to Dalhousie for my MSc. Being a graduate student at Dalhousie WILL allow you to apply as a maritime applicant but you do need to give up your Ontario applicant status.

 

That being said...I would strongly caution you to choose your MSc program based on a great supervisor and project that you will enjoy rather than the applicant pool you will qualify for after!

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I don't believe that any kind of full-time university program is considered "work" by Dal. There may be consideration on a case-by-case basis, but I invite you to read this from the Admissions website:

 

The place of residence for university students is normally presumed to be the country or province in which the home of the applicant's parents is located. Attendance at a university in the Maritime Provinces does not, by itself, constitute having residence in the Maritime Provinces. Each applicant is encouraged to give detailed and complete information on their resident status at the time of application. Relevant factors will be taken into account by the Admissions Committee in their determination of the residency status of each applicant.

 

So, I dunno. Having said all that, if you can get an interview as a non-Maritime applicant, you'd have a fair chance of getting in given the degree to which the waitlist tends to move. Good luck!

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I don't believe that any kind of full-time university program is considered "work" by Dal. There may be consideration on a case-by-case basis, but I invite you to read this from the Admissions website:

 

 

 

So, I dunno. Having said all that, if you can get an interview as a non-Maritime applicant, you'd have a fair chance of getting in given the degree to which the waitlist tends to move. Good luck!

 

An MSc is considered work by Dal so long as it's research based. Confirmed today by phone, haha.

 

And to the previous poster, I agree, absolutely. I happen to have done my undergrad at Dal too, so I know a few potential supervisors that I'd be interested in working for, and I'd have no trouble getting "insider information" on what it's like working in their labs.

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