Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Taking Courses of Increasing Level of Difficulty


Recommended Posts

Hi,

 

I was told by a friend that the adcoms examine the difficulty of the level of courses that you take, and will flag your application if you are taking easy courses. I am taking 6 x 3rd year courses right now, and have filled my empty spaces with relatively easy courses, and was wondering if that would affect me in any way.

 

Right now I am taking a first year music course which I have heard is a bird. But I was thinking of taking a mini-thesis course with a prof that I know...It's basically no-work + guaranteed high grade versus lots of work + potentially high grade???

 

Thanks,

jordan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure how its done.

 

I'm not at U of T.

 

But my Academic Councillor at my institution advised me NOT to take any first year courses.

 

I'm not sure what year your in. But I'm in 4th year so the majority of my courses are 4th year and the rest are 3rd year or second year.

 

In my opinion, the 1st year course does NOT look good in 4th year or beyond.

 

I'm not sure how they assess the difficulty of a course: By just the what year the course corresponds to or what the class average was?

 

- Lupe

 

EDIT: If you're taking the first year course to fulfill a degree requirement than that should be fine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Right now I'm taking 6x 3 year courses. 3 x 2nd year courses which are required for my degree. I was hoping to take an easy first year course for my last course... super easy... But I'm not sure whether I should do it or not.... and take a minithesis course instead....

 

I'm a third year if you hadn't noticed... and I was planning to take the second half of physics in my 4th year... because I plan to apply to McGil and a couple schools in the states :(.... Should I still take it then?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since this is in the UofT forum, I'll gear my answer towards UofT Med. I think the general answer you'll get is that the mini-thesis course will serve you better. UofT looks at coherence as well as rigour of your program. If you think you can do well in the mini-thesis (of course, with hard work), then I say go for that. It'll give you an experience to talk about in your sketch, essay, and interview. But don't do it if you think it'll kill your GPA (I doubt it, if it's only a 1 semester course and you're in your 3rd year).

 

I don't think it'd be a huge problem, really, if you end up taking 1 music course in your 3rd year. It's not a flag like GPA or the MCAT, but it's possible it may raise an eyebrow when they review your file.

 

This all being said, I myself am guilty of taking 1st year English, and I'm in my 4th year. But hopefully they'll understand - I'm applying outside of Ontario as well (UBC), and they require 1st year English!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As long as you don't take too many lower year courses (Toronto requests that at least 60% of your courses should be at the correct level), you should be fine taking a first year class in third year. I personally took 1 full credit of first year courses in second year (English) and third year (Physics) with no problem. Some schools may restrict how many first year courses you can take within a program, so you may want to look in to your program to see what their policy is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the feedback guys...

 

Since UofT is my first choice, I think I'm go with the thesis based course... if I can get the right prof...

 

But my backup plan is either a super easy physics course or a music course. I've taken the first half of physics so far... but this physics course is like the grade 12 physics curriculum... apparently it is not the anti-requsite of the first half... So I thought I might exploit this loop hole. I don't know if this will raise an eye on my application, so I can take the music course instead....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nah I doubt they would refuse you an interview just because you took a 1-semester Music course in 3rd year. But you never know, they might ask you about it in the interview, and you'll want an answer other than "it's an easy course." As future_doc said, it gives you variety, which is viewed in a positive light too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...