Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Help: Earning a MSc @ a school with good reputation?


Recommended Posts

I've graduated with a high GPA (> 3.8), with good references and I am confident that I can get into any graduate school in Canada. I'm planning on attending graduate school for either neuroscience or regenerative medicine. I've met with a professor at york who seemed easy to get along and I am very interested in his project; however, I am hesitant in accepting the offer due to the schools reputation.

 

I would like to obtain a MD eventually (although i am also considering the possibility of a MD/pHD). I was wondering how important it is to earn a MSc degree at a school with good reputation? Should I accept the offer and work with someone I feel comfortable with, and on project that I am very interested in? or should I try to get in a respectable school like U of T or Mcgill?

 

Thank you for all your help!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd take a prof who does something fascinating over a more prestigious school. Two or three years seems an awful lot longer when you're doing something you dislike.

 

With regards to getting your MD, no admissions committee in Canada cares where you went.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would definitely think much more carefully about how a professor's research and supervisory "style" jive with your interests than the prestige of the school; if you sacrifice the former for the latter, you'll probably spend 2-3 years regretting it.

 

If possible, I would also talk to his current students about how he interacts with them, what his availability is generally like, what he expects from his students, etc. Their impression of his supervisory style may be slightly different from his own.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... I've met with a professor at york who seemed easy to get along and I am very interested in his project; however, I am hesitant in accepting the offer due to the schools reputation.

 

... should I try to get in a respectable school like U of T or McGill?...

 

Thank you for all your help!

 

I was unaware that York is an unrespectable school. The fact of the matter is that any school in Canada will give you a good education. School "prestige" means absolutely nothing in Canada in terms of finding a job later, finding a good research project/professor or getting a good education.

 

You definitely have the grades to get in wherever you want, but that's not all that is considered in the application process. A lot of times it comes down to the supervisors preferences. I.e. If you have no research experience, and/or if you don't mesh well with the professor and his other students you may not get accepted if that's what the supervisor want the student to have...this can happen at any school.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've graduated with a high GPA (> 3.8), with good references and I am confident that I can get into any graduate school in Canada. I'm planning on attending graduate school for either neuroscience or regenerative medicine. I've met with a professor at york who seemed easy to get along and I am very interested in his project; however, I am hesitant in accepting the offer due to the schools reputation.

 

I would like to obtain a MD eventually (although i am also considering the possibility of a MD/pHD). I was wondering how important it is to earn a MSc degree at a school with good reputation? Should I accept the offer and work with someone I feel comfortable with, and on project that I am very interested in? or should I try to get in a respectable school like U of T or Mcgill?

 

Thank you for all your help!

 

Nope. If your goal is to eventually get an MD in Canada, the "prestige" of your graduate school does not matter.

 

The single most important thing is enjoying your project and finding a lab you think you can work well in. If you plan to stay in a certain field, who you work for is much more important than where you worked for them. Famous profs can be at any school and having a recognizable scientist on your CV would give you more than a "prestigious" school name would in this country. That being said, it is not the best idea to actively seek someone famous without taking into account what I mentioned earlier (picking something you like and a lab you will do well in).

 

Now, if you have plans to go to the US there is an argument to be made for the prestige of your previous schools. The culture of the graduate schools down there is a bit different and the school is actually directly responsible for more of the graduate training than they typically are here. For that reason (any maybe a couple of others), the prestige of a school can sometimes come into play in the US.

 

Since you plan on applying to an MD/PhD (in Canada, I assume) the location of your MSc. won't matter one bit. The MD/PhD programs in this country just want to see that you will be able to handle the added weight of the program and have a genuine interest in research. Good grades, a record of previous research positions, strong recommendations from your supervisor(s), and your accomplishments (papers, seminars, abstracts) will be far and away your most important attributes to landing an MD/PhD here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would have to agree with all of the posts above - the project/supervisor matter a lot more than the school (in this country anyway). Also, as said above, you can find a well-recognized scientist in any school... the school itself is of lesser importance.

 

One more thing though - I think choosing a supervisor who suits your needs is probably of much greater importance than we sometimes think. Some people want a supervisor who will check in on them everyday; some want one who will check in once a week. Some people want a supervisor who pushes them, and others want to be left alone. Everyone differs in their preferences, so I think finding a supervisor who is in accordance with your preferences is really, really important. Having that and a project that truly interests you are probably the 2 most important factors to look at when picking where you want to go.

 

Good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...