Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Recommended Posts

I actually did a bachelor's and masters of nursing before starting med at mac. Many of the nurses in my class had recently completed the BScN, however. As long as you have a competitive GPA and do well on Casper (they didn't have this when I was admitted), you'll have a good shot. Good luck.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats great! I have just completed BScN and looking for a job.. few interviews lined up.. as well as considering a masters… not sure in what yet.. possibly nutrition.. however

this year the new formula is 25% GPA my cumulative gpa is 3.45… my lost two years are cometitive (3.6, 3.87) but my first year is hurting me.. should I upgrade undergrad?

or work and masters?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Thats great! I have just completed BScN and looking for a job.. few interviews lined up.. as well as considering a masters… not sure in what yet.. possibly nutrition.. however

this year the new formula is 25% GPA my cumulative gpa is 3.45… my lost two years are cometitive (3.6, 3.87) but my first year is hurting me.. should I upgrade undergrad?

or work and masters?

 

Your GPA is on the lower side for Mac, however, the GPA is worth less than when I was applying. So if you were to do well on Casper and the Verbal section of the MCAT, you might have a chance. To increase your chances, might be worthwhile to look into requirements of other schools which tend to look at the more recent years for GPA (ie, discounting first undergrad year).

 

Doing a masters won't help your chances for med school that much. If med at Mac is where you want to be then you should definitely complete another undergrad degree and get stellar grades to improve your cGPA. But you should also look into other areas of nursing that you might like or even the NP route (which has expanded roles - more similar to the role of a physician).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey,

 

I graduated Ryerson June 2010, GPA 3.67 (OMSAS), wrote MCAT for VR (13), worked for a year in ER, homecare, and a tiny bit of research, read "Principles of Biomedical Ethics" and "Doing Right" for CASPER and then the Mac interview, and got in to Mac this year.

 

If you do exceptionally well on CASPER and VR, and then the interview, then you do have a chance despite a lower GPA.

 

DonGeo

Mac Meds 2014

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...
Hey,

 

I graduated Ryerson June 2010, GPA 3.67 (OMSAS), wrote MCAT for VR (13), worked for a year in ER, homecare, and a tiny bit of research, read "Principles of Biomedical Ethics" and "Doing Right" for CASPER and then the Mac interview, and got in to Mac this year.

 

Hmm sorry for not know this . . . but I didn't know it was possible to write the mcat 'only for VR.' Could someone explain how this works? Do you just void the other test sections?

Link to post
Share on other sites

@ Immy

 

In my experience ER nursing has been very rewarding. You get to see a variety of patients in all sorts of conditions. Most will not be seen by a physician for at least 5-6 hours, so it is up to you to determine who needs attention right now and who can wait. You will get to sedate, defibrillate, start lots of IV's, restrain, read 12-lead ECGs, monitor people with acute strokes, MIs, psychosis, etc. You get to work a lot with many different specialties - RTs, ER docs, specialist docs, crisis workers, security, police officers, and some very hardened, experienced nurses. You have a considerable degree of autonomy- you are the one to triage, you perform the first assessment, you read the ECG and determine if it needs immediate attention; you also have a variety of medical directives you can initiate when you see certain symptoms, e.g. bloodwork, X-Rays, some medications, topical anaesthetic, etc. There are many many courses you can take to become a better ER nurse including pediatrics courses, advanced life-support courses, cardiology courses, and trauma courses. Your hospital will usually pay for these.

 

Overall, I can't say enough about ER nursing. There are, of course, some downsides. You're payed the same as nurses on any other floor while doing, arguably, much more work than on most other floors. You are expected to know more, to work faster, and in tougher conditions. Your breaks are shorter, your patients are more acute. Most of your patients don't have a bed, a diagnosis, a doctor, and they are, understandably, running out of patience and taking it out on you. Burn out is very common, and, while it is a great specialty to work in for a few years while you are young, I could not see myself working there for more than 5-6 years. In fact, many of the older nurses working in ER are quite jaded, worn out, and often a little odd - as much as I love them!

 

Anyways, best of luck to you in your nursing career, and should you choose ER nursing, I hope you enjoy it as much as I have.

 

DonGeo

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...