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research intensive areas of medicine


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hi,

 

i was just wondering if anyone knew of the more research focused areas of med? i have dabbled in research briefly with a master's and have realized that it is not really my cup of tea. i am glad for this. however, i would probably like to avoid the areas of medicine that require alot of research along with clinical practice.

 

thanks.

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Im guessing for psychiatry you'd be researching drugs for schizophrenia, Alzheimer's and diseases like that. Pretty sure there's lots of areas of research there

 

For family medicine i'm guessing the research would look at wait times, statistics, methods of treatment, different types of communication, etc. Less clinical and more administrative type research I think.

 

Correct me if I'm wrong

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I think you could likely have a private practice and not be involved in research if you so chose. Of course, you'd still have to keep up to date with continuing medical education.

 

all physicians are required to do CME's if i am not mistaken. how research intensive is surgery, internal med, or neurology?

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Even some academics don't do much research, they mostly do some clinical trials and case reports. Also continuing medical education is by no means research, it's staying up to date with the standards of practice. OP don't worry, if you don't like research, you can go into any field (even community med or pathology) and don't do much research, even in academics.

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hi,

 

i was just wondering if anyone knew of the more research focused areas of med? i have dabbled in research briefly with a master's and have realized that it is not really my cup of tea. i am glad for this. however, i would probably like to avoid the areas of medicine that require alot of research along with clinical practice.

 

thanks.

 

 

Most specialties, you can integrate either clinical or basic science research, but some lend themselves better to one kind than the other (e.g. commH, family medicine is usually more clinical).

 

It all depends on how you want to gear your practice - some clinicians never do any research, while others will run labs on the side.

 

You have a relatively large swath - for basic sciences, I imagine for surgical + IM , you can focus in on the organ systems and disease processes in the system you deal with. For clinical research, the whole world is your oyster, since your patient population is 'all you need' for data sampling.

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I have heard that some residencies strongly encourage you to do a heavy research component as part of your training. NeuroSx is one.

 

this is the understanding that i had as well. some areas require research and almost all residents are required to get MSc's or Phd's, whereas others are not. i understand that neurosurgery is such an area. i was wondering if neurology has a huge research component?

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this is the understanding that i had as well. some areas require research and almost all residents are required to get MSc's or Phd's, whereas others are not. i understand that neurosurgery is such an area. i was wondering if neurology has a huge research component?

but that doesn't necessarily mean that you have to have an MSc or PhD before getting into an neurosurgery residency, right? It's during the 6 years of residency that most people get those degrees...yes?

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this is the understanding that i had as well. some areas require research and almost all residents are required to get MSc's or Phd's, whereas others are not. i understand that neurosurgery is such an area. i was wondering if neurology has a huge research component?

 

I think the research heavy focus of neurosx might be partially due to the fact that surgical jobs are harder to come by so you need s few extra letters behind your name to be "qualified"

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I think the research heavy focus of neurosx might be partially due to the fact that surgical jobs are harder to come by so you need s few extra letters behind your name to be "qualified"

 

maybe - could also be the cultural aspect of the field.

 

Cardiac surgery at Western has a year off in the degree for people to specifically do research, masters or something similar. I hear that is pretty common for that field as well overall

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As far as I know, you will have to do some form of research to get through your residency program, no matter what it is. Not all require MSc/MPH/PhDs, but even in family medicine, we had to do some sort of research project. Mind you, considering the short length of our program, "research" could be a lit review/critical appraisal, but something time-consuming all the same. From what I've seen, many 5-year programs require something more substantial than this. It's all about making well-rounded physicians in the eyes of the colleges.

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correct me if im wrong, but i got the impression allergy and immunology had a big focus on research with your practice...

 

for surg now you need and msc to work at academic centres, but once you have the msc you're pretty much done

 

 

hi,

 

i was just wondering if anyone knew of the more research focused areas of med? i have dabbled in research briefly with a master's and have realized that it is not really my cup of tea. i am glad for this. however, i would probably like to avoid the areas of medicine that require alot of research along with clinical practice.

 

thanks.

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yeah, i had a history of medicine thing with a med geneticist and she did a lot of research and epidemeology stuff on the side... yeah, allergy is a pretty small section of im, there's only like a handful of allergists in the city, and most clinicians do a lot of peds work, if you do adult exclusively you almost have to do research to fill in the hours.

 

i know a clinician who was a medical microbiologist and she did a lot of clinical research on toxoplasma, i would imagine stuff like medical biochemistry and the like would also have a heavy research aspect to it as well.

 

public health of course naturally lends itself to research.

 

most docs do in these fields do clinical research anyways, which is a totally different ball game than basic research... i think med gen and allergy may be the only things where you may have to do some basic research or supervise a lab

 

You're probably right but keep in mind that allergy immunology isn't a residency in itself, it's a very small subspecialty.

Also, I think that most medical geneticists (if not all of them) do research.

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Public health isn't necessarily very research-focused; medical officers of health, for example, typically won't do any, though of course this varies.

 

There are numerous specialties which can lead to research in basic sciences - functional neurosurgery, surgical oncology, med onc/heme - just about anything really, but it's all dependent on background and what kind of other training one has.

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