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UofT Dent vs. Med


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Hello Dental friends,

 

I am a medical student at UofT, but someone I met last night is a dental student at UofT. She was telling me that she feels that the medical students are pampered and taken better care of than the dental students. That your notes are not online in preparation of the class sometimes, that lectures are not recorded and hosted online and that she felt we had better "perks" than they did. She also said she felt that dentistry was a "mean" atmosphere whereas ours was more carefree.

 

Is this true? Do you UofT dents feel this way as well? If so I feel sad. I actually thought the dental students were going to be the ones to have it the best and that the school would be a lot of fun (and obviously hard work).

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similar to most schools i believe. however a mean atmosphere? is that from the class or the faculty?

 

at U of A sometimes our lectures arent posted and our lectures arent recorded.

 

might just be the student/year that youre talking about-some classes are more competitive than others

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Hello Dental friends,

 

I am a medical student at UofT, but someone I met last night is a dental student at UofT. She was telling me that she feels that the medical students are pampered and taken better care of than the dental students. That your notes are not online in preparation of the class sometimes, that lectures are not recorded and hosted online and that she felt we had better "perks" than they did. She also said she felt that dentistry was a "mean" atmosphere whereas ours was more carefree.

 

Is this true? Do you UofT dents feel this way as well? If so I feel sad. I actually thought the dental students were going to be the ones to have it the best and that the school would be a lot of fun (and obviously hard work).

I've heard from many dental students that they feel medical school is much easier, but there are several factors to consider. Firstly is that many dentists I've met have told me dentists typically don't play well together. Although many dental classes are close knit, I've heard clinical profs can be overly critical of work and have strong opinions. Secondly, dental school involves the development of intricate hand-eye skills as well as a demand for perfection from (some) profs. Up until dental school, most if not all of the students have been the top of their classes with very little effort (there was a lot of time and work, but in the end, you're just doing the same thing over and over in different courses). Med school has less rigorous demands for quick development of foreign skills (as 1st and 2nd year are largely theoretical). This is also why most dental achools have their dental students in class 3+ hours longer than meds (although some schools have equal time). On top of this, dentistry seems to attract a perfectionist personality; this makes it frustrating to suck at drilling at the beginning and work hard, yet only yield marginally better results. Finally, like stated above, everybody has a different experience. I've heard of many people having an enjoyable experience through dental school and how they were the best years of their life. I've also heard that it was the worst four years filled with stress and many nervous breakdowns. I'd tend to agree that by sheer resources, the med faculty is better off (visit the dent building some time and you'll likely agree) but I also think dentistry is pretty slow/resistant to change and while the med faculty pours money into development and undergrad MD education, most dental schools are only starting (ie. UBC, UoA and USask are going through upgrades and curriculum changes).

 

Hope this helps.

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I just graduated from UofT dentistry. Definitely the worst 4 years of my life. My brother is in medical school (not UofT) and he describes it as the best time of his life. Take that as you will.

 

I was never that stressed about day-to-day work, or lectures, or tests, or lab-work. Clinical requirements were what kept me up at night. Med school does not to my knowledge require you to finish a certain number of procedures in order to graduate, regardless of whether or not you have patients requiring/wanting/affording those treatments.

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I've heard from many dental students that they feel medical school is much easier, but there are several factors to consider. Firstly is that many dentists I've met have told me dentists typically don't play well together. Although many dental classes are close knit, I've heard clinical profs can be overly critical of work and have strong opinions. Secondly, dental school involves the development of intricate hand-eye skills as well as a demand for perfection from (some) profs. Up until dental school, most if not all of the students have been the top of their classes with very little effort (there was a lot of time and work, but in the end, you're just doing the same thing over and over in different courses). Med school has less rigorous demands for quick development of foreign skills (as 1st and 2nd year are largely theoretical). This is also why most dental achools have their dental students in class 3+ hours longer than meds (although some schools have equal time). On top of this, dentistry seems to attract a perfectionist personality; this makes it frustrating to suck at drilling at the beginning and work hard, yet only yield marginally better results. Finally, like stated above, everybody has a different experience. I've heard of many people having an enjoyable experience through dental school and how they were the best years of their life. I've also heard that it was the worst four years filled with stress and many nervous breakdowns. I'd tend to agree that by sheer resources, the med faculty is better off (visit the dent building some time and you'll likely agree) but I also think dentistry is pretty slow/resistant to change and while the med faculty pours money into development and undergrad MD education, most dental schools are only starting (ie. UBC, UoA and USask are going through upgrades and curriculum changes).

 

Hope this helps.

 

That really gave me a detailed perspective into what this girl must have meant by her comments yesterday. Thanks for writing all of that up. I'd like to understand what my dent colleagues are going through and this really helps (and by colleagues, I mean I consider all health professionals my peers and colleagues :)

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I just graduated from UofT dentistry. Definitely the worst 4 years of my life. My brother is in medical school (not UofT) and he describes it as the best time of his life. Take that as you will.

 

I was never that stressed about day-to-day work, or lectures, or tests, or lab-work. Clinical requirements were what kept me up at night. Med school does not to my knowledge require you to finish a certain number of procedures in order to graduate, regardless of whether or not you have patients requiring/wanting/affording those treatments.

 

I'm really sorry things were crappy for you at UofT. I can't even imagine the stress you must have gone through. :( I've always been interested in dentistry as well and really respect what you guys have to go through.

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thanks for your concern, lost_in_space...

i think the issue with "mean" atmosphere as someone mentioned earlier has lots more to do with the way staff and faculty treat the students than the relationship among students themselves...yes, uoft has a very competitive environment but students usually like to help each other when someone suffers or goes through a hard time...uoft dentistry itself is unfortunately behind on adopting technology for education..unlike UofA and some other dental schools that share first 2 years with meds and benefit from the common recorded and videotaped curriculum, we have to stick out with not having lectures recorded...a lot of times, theres frustration that even notes handed in class and/or ppt slides are not sufficiently detailed to help you in tests/exams..once in clinic however, it becomes very individual and your ability to perform depends not on how well you know the material but rather on how well you can operate the drill..

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I don't really understand this thread. The two degrees, other than training in health care, are not comparable.

 

Obviously, dentistry is going to be a more difficult degree. Why? Because you are supposed to be fully competent upon completion. The MD program is to train you to have been exposed to the most prevalent health care issues. MD isn't a license to practice - it is a license to continue your educational training in the clinical setting under supervision but with greater responsibility. DDS means you are supposed to be able to practice without supervision. That qualification brings with it a tremendous risk of liability to the school - they need to ensure you are competent because they are giving you a license.

 

A large portion of the UofT faculty are "quirky". That is not specific to the dentistry faculty. Preceptors are often harsh and unnecessarily critical. As a student, once you realize that a lot of it is a character flaw of the preceptor, things are a lot easier. If you can't deal with it, then you'll have a tough time. If you are mature enough to take the comments for what they are and toss out the rest as being trivial, you'll enjoy Toronto.

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That's cuz med>dent. Everyone knows that.

 

im not arguing for one or the other but what id like to say to you is:

keep telling yourself that..you're on the outside looking in

 

also please dont troll and ruin this thread with what its not about... ">" is very subjective

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im not arguing for one or the other but what id like to say to you is:

keep telling yourself that..you're on the outside looking in

 

also please dont troll and ruin this thread with what its not about... ">" is very subjective

 

lets not feed the trolls no more.

 

we all know in terms of gpa cut-off dent is at least on par (or higher for some schools) with med. We also know that it depends on the preference of an individual to choose dentistry over medicine.

 

The field of medicine is diverse- you can try out bunch of stuff and apply for something you like later during match. The field of dentistry is restricted to surgery. Don't go into dentistry if you don't have manual dexterity. I like working with my hands so I didn't see the point of going to med school and do 4-5 years extra to become a surgeon of some sort.....

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I've talked to a dentist a few years out of UofT, he said it was pretty much horrible, the teachers treated the students bad and all that, he didn't get into too much detail about it though.

 

D:

 

I'm assuming he's happy now that he's practicing?

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I don't really understand this thread. The two degrees, other than training in health care, are not comparable.

 

Obviously, dentistry is going to be a more difficult degree. Why? Because you are supposed to be fully competent upon completion. The MD program is to train you to have been exposed to the most prevalent health care issues. MD isn't a license to practice - it is a license to continue your educational training in the clinical setting under supervision but with greater responsibility. DDS means you are supposed to be able to practice without supervision. That qualification brings with it a tremendous risk of liability to the school - they need to ensure you are competent because they are giving you a license.

 

A large portion of the UofT faculty are "quirky". That is not specific to the dentistry faculty. Preceptors are often harsh and unnecessarily critical. As a student, once you realize that a lot of it is a character flaw of the preceptor, things are a lot easier. If you can't deal with it, then you'll have a tough time. If you are mature enough to take the comments for what they are and toss out the rest as being trivial, you'll enjoy Toronto.

 

Yes, very very true points, I didn't think of that (that you need to be fully ready to practice on graduation).

 

In bonus points, I am often jealous of what the dental students wear. You guys look cool :-)

 

IMG_0194.img_assist_custom.JPG

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Yes, very very true points, I didn't think of that (that you need to be fully ready to practice on graduation).

 

In bonus points, I am often jealous of what the dental students wear. You guys look cool :-)

 

IMG_0194.img_assist_custom.JPG

 

Yeah the Loupes are totally awesome.

I believe most surgeons wear them.

I'm jealous of the stethoscopes med students wear.

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