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How do you study..


john2520

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Hey I thought it would be a good idea just to share some studying tips and habits on how to get good marks seeing as everyone here is trying to get into med-school.

 

Ill start, make sure to review your notes right after a lecture just so you can retain information and if you have time, try to reading the topics that will be covered in your next lecture before the lecture.

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I almost never read the textbook (or buy it) unless it is absolutely required by a professor (ex: Psychology). The textbook either gives you way too much information, or leads you into a different direction than what the prof is teaching you.

 

I try to make condensed notes of class notes, but also go over the whole material once a week. For conceptual courses, I do a lot of problems (ex:Organic chemistry, General Chemistry and Physics).

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It depends on the subject, and the type of learner you are for example reading the textbook and highlighting definitions for a calculus class instead of spending 90% of the effort on practice problems instead would be asinine. As well as focusing on theory if you're a kinesthetic/practice learner is useless. Not to mention It's not black and gray and different people learn things different ways. I guess I'm a prime example of this; I cannot for the life of me just memorize things, I must understand the concept or I will never truly retain it. So as to not give fruitless, and introverted advice I'll try to leave general and hopefully unique tips:

 

1. Set a timer. Where all human and so we can't study effectively for extended periods of time. What I do is use a timer app and set two study times, one that is 50 minutes and a light study slot for 25min. Use about two or three blocks per subject. Make sure there is at least a 10 min break in between each slot.

 

2. Use the internet as a resource. You can find channels like khan academy patrickJMT and others on youtube. Sometimes you'll find your teachers aren't as clear as you hope or maybe a concept seems too jumbled. Just google it, there will always be an animation or diagram to help. (warning stay away from wikipedia, the terminology is confusing and is majority of the time lacking/incorrect.)

 

3. Read the chapter again but in reverse. I read somewhere that we retain much more of the beginning of the chapter than the end. This should help counter act that.

 

4. Become an individual learner. Don't depend on your teacher so much and actually use the online resources that come with your textbook. Try to learn and depend on your own.

 

5. Print out the chapter or practise sheets or whatever so that you can put it in you're pocket and study on the go. Sometimes we have appointments or work or other commitments and can't study in blocks. We can still take advantage of breaks or the long commute on the bus and study for small bursts.

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i have no short term memory, so basically i get a private room and relate concepts, basically almost exclusively reading or discussing, verbally discussing it with myself, what it means, what new idea's could come from what i've learned, how it would effect me in real life... then i usually teach a bunch of people it.

 

honestly, i just developed this way to compensate for lack of short term mem, cause i'd use it for like finding my keys even (i came home thru here, went here, did this... etc.), so it's so habituated it's easy to use for anything, it's tough to force yourself to do (if i didn't have to i'd never have the discipline), but once you do you retain things at a disturbingly high level because everything is hedged with novel information, postulates, what you already know... like a neural network where point a is retrievable via 50 other interconnected points, versus cold memorization.

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it's funny how many drugs depend on chirality quite a bit. try and find d-deprenyl, but d and l refer to plane polarized light, so l and d don't necessarily correspond to chirality in a uniform way, where if l then s, if d then r, polarization is independent of chirality, in the sense that chirality can unequivecally predict polarization... but the fact that it is non generalizable does not degate individual contingencies, on a molecule to molecule to molecule basis, meaning that while notation in pharmacology often follows plane polarized convention, the prior necessitates a chiral centre meaning that medications physicians prescribe do depend on chirality... so yeah, i study like that... it has so many hedges that well, even if i forget, it'll take me like 10 seconds to go if this, then... yeah, there we go

 

chirality ftw?
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