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In my humble opinion, you gotta get your hands dirty and go to the gross lab. For me, I can read books and look at animated tools all I want but to really learn the stuff I have to put my hands on it. The process of searching for various structures helps me to not only better learn how to find the structure on a bell ringer but also increases my understanding of its relation to nearby structures in the body, which can be clinically relevant.

 

Also, though this is borderline keener (if not fully keener), I like to shadow surgery :) I remember a lot of MSK stuff from seeing/scrubbing in on procedures. For example, I will always remember that the sural nerve runs lateral of the achilles tendon because in a rupture achilles repair the resident had to find it and ensure that it was safe and sound before mucking around too much. Or seeing the fovea and round ligament of the femur by holding a fractured femur head in a hemiarthroplasty of the hip.

 

This is obviously not an option for exam studying but it's pretty cool if you can shadow a physician that works in the field you are currently studying.

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functional relations between things... and whrere they likely are

 

do u think it'll ne funner when ots over... for good, and you get a linrary full of cool **** you like instead of assigned books, jocjosj os jof od miss;

 

Hey!

 

I'dd love for you guys to tell me how you study anatomy (muscles and their origin, insertions, actions, etc.) I'm only having trouble studying in this area.

 

Thanks alot!

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Go to the gym for muscles.

For me colour coding was essential to learning a lot of the anatomy, not sure why because I have never used it for anything else, but I seem to remember it based off of that.

 

Ok thanks :P But I meant was, do you guys write the stuff all over, repeat the material in your head, draw stuff... or w-e :) Because I tend to repeat each sentence like 30 times out loud, I mean, it used to work before with pre-req science courses but after my first exam, I noticed it really doesn't...Thanks!

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Try to find relationships between different structures. This will help you memorize them and identify them quickly in the lab. For example, musculocutaneous nerves pierces coracobrachialis muscle. Or this structures runs over that structure. Also, knowing the function of each muscle groups helps you understand its innervation (ex. the major extensors of the upper limb are generally innervated by the radial nerve) and its points of origin and insertion on bones.

 

For memorizing anatomy, I prefer books such as Netter's or Rohen's. For understanding anatomy, I strongly recommend Moore's. The more you understand, the less you have to memorize ! Personally I tend to study one segment at a time and then hide the names of the structures in the book, then try to identify them.

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Every time I go to the gym I try to focus on what muscles I'm working out with that particular exercise and their insertions, origins, innervations, and functions. It helps because at least that way you're reviewing anatomy several times a week. If you have a systematic workout routine, the repetition is cemented in your mind.

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There's three ways I do it, depending on the kinds of structures:

1-Making flow charts for arteries, veins and nerves. This gives me an overview of which arterie gives which smaller arterie and the structures they irrigate. Much more easier to study than an anatomy slide.

2-Trying to redraw the anatomy. No need to be good a drawing, but just to place the right structures at the right place relative to one another. Try to do it by heart, and then compare to the anatomy slide to see your mistakes.

3-Use your body to remember things, especially for muscles and bones. For example, you want to study where does a certain muscle in your forearm attaches itself. Look a your forarm, find that muscle and follow it. Study how this muscle works on your own harm, what movements it can do and where it goes, etc. Of course, you can't do this with every muscles in you body ;).

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