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Hey guy's, when I originally became a part of this site my idea was to become a Doctor. Over a period of time I began to think it would be cool to be a physician assistant or even a nurse practitioner.

 

I wanted to know what schools in Canada offer this program, and also how competitive would you say it is to get in? Is it nearly as hard as medical school?

 

P.S I am a male, I know nursing is predominantly females, but are there a fair number of males working in this field? I look forward to hearing back from you guys.

 

Thank you all for your help. I look forward to hearing back from you.

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Manitoba, McMaster, and UofT all have PA programs. Look into each school because all three programs are fairly distinct. Manitoba graduates students with a Masters of PA studies and their cirriuculum requires a "mini thesis". McMaster graduates students with a bachelor degree and uses the PBL method for teaching - a method that isn't a perfect fit for everyone. UofT has a large component of distance and online learning (also not for everyone) and requires that applicants have at least one year of experience in health care.

 

Competition for applying to the PA program is steadily increasing... McMaster received 460 applications this year compared to 250 in the previous year. The program only accepts 24 students as the profession is still growing and there is a greater priority in ensuring all graduates can secure competitive jobs.

 

As it stands currently women do dominate most careers in healthcare, though it is most prominently seen in nursing. I think all of the current PA classes at Mac have never had more than 5-6 male students out of a total of 24. I wouldn't worry too much about this... It likely only reflects the fact that more females then males apply to these programs and has no real impact on your chance of admission, employment, ect.

 

Best of luck

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Manitoba, McMaster, and UofT all have PA programs. Look into each school because all three programs are fairly distinct. Manitoba graduates students with a Masters of PA studies and their cirriuculum requires a "mini thesis". McMaster graduates students with a bachelor degree and uses the PBL method for teaching - a method that isn't a perfect fit for everyone. UofT has a large component of distance and online learning (also not for everyone) and requires that applicants have at least one year of experience in health care.

 

in healthcare, though it is most prominently seen in nursing. I think all of the current PA classes at Mac have never had more than 5-6 male students out of a total of 24. I wouldn't worry too much about this... It likely only reflects the fact that more females then males apply to these programs and has no real impact on your chance of admission, employment, ect.

 

Best of luck

 

 

Thanks for the response, also is one able to obtain a PA in the states and the practice in Canada? Also would you recommend a PA career or a nurse practitioner career?

 

And lastly, what is the average GPA of an applicant to these schools? Do you have any ideal extra curricular activities that would benefit me when applying?

 

thanks for your help

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I'd go the NP route. I'm just about to graduate as an RN and I've researched both positions extensively. At first I was 100% on going to med school after nursing but I've changed my mind and I can do much of what I want to do as an NP. MD's have way too much responsibility and as an NP my day would end relatively routinely. From what I've seen in clinical practice NP's also function like residents but are paid fairly well in contrast.

 

You also have to remember that getting into PA school is about equal if not harder to get into than medical school. There's a handful of schools and each one admits no more than 20? I think UofM admits 14. Then you have to go through all the stress of MMIs, interviews etc.

 

To become an NP you need to graduate with a BscN and then go onto to get about 2 years experience in an acute setting (ER, ICU, Med/Surg/NICU.) After which you do your masters in nursing which takes 2 years and then you spend another year specializing in either Primary Care, Emergency, Nephrology, Neonatology..etc

 

PA school will probably be shorter but NP's have way more autonomy in the fact that they don't have to get their charts reviewed and signed by an MD.

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Hello,

 

I'm heading into the U of M PA program in the fall (there's 12 spots). Feel free to pm me if you want to know more about the application process as its still fresh in my mind! You should of course consider:

-what your goals in medicine are

-where you want to study/live

-what prerequisites you've already completed and which you need to complete for each program. Are you thinking of applying this fall or are you still a few years off?

- and of course, where you stand relative to others who have been accepted. The U of M doesn't tell us what the average admitted GPA was but I'd be happy to tell you mine over pm.

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I'd go the NP route. I'm just about to graduate as an RN and I've researched both positions extensively. At first I was 100% on going to med school after nursing but I've changed my mind and I can do much of what I want to do as an NP. MD's have way too much responsibility and as an NP my day would end relatively routinely. From what I've seen in clinical practice NP's also function like residents but are paid fairly well in contrast.

 

You also have to remember that getting into PA school is about equal if not harder to get into than medical school. There's a handful of schools and each one admits no more than 20? I think UofM admits 14. Then you have to go through all the stress of MMIs, interviews etc.

 

To become an NP you need to graduate with a BscN and then go onto to get about 2 years experience in an acute setting (ER, ICU, Med/Surg/NICU.) After which you do your masters in nursing which takes 2 years and then you spend another year specializing in either Primary Care, Emergency, Nephrology, Neonatology..etc

 

PA school will probably be shorter but NP's have way more autonomy in the fact that they don't have to get their charts reviewed and signed by an MD.

 

 

Hexonu, I found this response extremely interesting, is there anyway I could PM you? I have a couple of questions as I once did consider becoming a nurse practitioner.

 

I'd greatly appreciate it if me and you could talk over private messages.

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Hello,

 

I'm heading into the U of M PA program in the fall (there's 12 spots). Feel free to pm me if you want to know more about the application process as its still fresh in my mind! You should of course consider:

-what your goals in medicine are

-where you want to study/live

-what prerequisites you've already completed and which you need to complete for each program. Are you thinking of applying this fall or are you still a few years off?

- and of course, where you stand relative to others who have been accepted. The U of M doesn't tell us what the average admitted GPA was but I'd be happy to tell you mine over pm.

 

pahopeful67, I really appreciate your determination to help me. The only questions I would have in terms of becoming a Physician assistant was what your marks were like? You undergraduate background? Your EC'S that helped you get in etc. I'd greatly appreciate it if you PM me with some information you think may be beneficial. Thank you.

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I'd go the NP route. I'm just about to graduate as an RN and I've researched both positions extensively. At first I was 100% on going to med school after nursing but I've changed my mind and I can do much of what I want to do as an NP. MD's have way too much responsibility and as an NP my day would end relatively routinely. From what I've seen in clinical practice NP's also function like residents but are paid fairly well in contrast.

 

You also have to remember that getting into PA school is about equal if not harder to get into than medical school. There's a handful of schools and each one admits no more than 20? I think UofM admits 14. Then you have to go through all the stress of MMIs, interviews etc.

 

To become an NP you need to graduate with a BscN and then go onto to get about 2 years experience in an acute setting (ER, ICU, Med/Surg/NICU.) After which you do your masters in nursing which takes 2 years and then you spend another year specializing in either Primary Care, Emergency, Nephrology, Neonatology..etc

 

PA school will probably be shorter but NP's have way more autonomy in the fact that they don't have to get their charts reviewed and signed by an MD.

 

You made some very interesting points, but for the sake of objectivity I'll offer some counter points.

 

1. In a NP-run family clinic I would argue that the NP will have equal (or similar) responsibility to that of an MD in a family practice.

 

2. Getting into PA school is challenging... but getting into a NP program isn't much easier either. The reality is that especially in Ontario all professional programs have steep competition.

 

3. Yes, a NP will always be more autonomous than a PA. To say that PAs always need to have their charts reviewed and signed by an MD is a misunderstanding of the profession. The PA acts under the supervision of the MD and is able to do anything that the MD is trained to do and delegates to the PA. During the first few years out of school it is likely the PA will not have a great deal of autonomy and will need their charts reviewed and signed. This is also true of residents in medical school. After a number of years of experience, an increased scope of practice as delegated by the supervising physician, the PA does not necessarily need the supervising physician to even be physically present.

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Well then I'll counter your counter :P. Kidding

 

1. NPs cannot prescribe controlled narcotics, MD's can. NP's also have a list of diagnostics tests that they can choose from, an MD has no limitations for tests. There is a much different scope of practise when even comparing a NP with a FMP.

 

2. Getting into Graduate school is fairly easy, in Alberta atleast. You can even take your degree online (kind of laughable I know but eh). I've known someone with a 2.9 get in.

 

3. I don't know much about the PA profession but the concept is to be an extender and while a physican doesnt have to be present, his/her actions are closely monitered. After all you're practising under an MD's license.

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I think it depends on if the program is accreddited and whether or not it meets the standards of practice. I know at the moment they are working on making porgrams in Canada accreddited to be accepted in the States, not sure about vice versa. I also know that when you do apply to practice here it may take up to 2 years for your education to be evaluated. Certainly not impossible to come back to Canada but it would probably take significant effort especially considering how new this profession is.

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I think it depends on if the program is accreddited and whether or not it meets the standards of practice. I know at the moment they are working on making porgrams in Canada accreddited to be accepted in the States, not sure about vice versa. I also know that when you do apply to practice here it may take up to 2 years for your education to be evaluated. Certainly not impossible to come back to Canada but it would probably take significant effort especially considering how new this profession is.

 

Yeah that is what I was thinking as well. Well I am thankful that I am only 18 and have a lot of time to think about my future. At the same time it fears me because by the time I am done, the process will probably be much more rigorous then it is now. That fears me.

 

Did you end up getting my PM hexonu?

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From what I have researched, you may go to a PA school in the USA and then return to practice in Canada after writing the CCPA exam. But in order to gain acceptance into an American PA program, you often need to have their prerequisite courses, a Bachelor's degree, volunteer work and you need to have anywhere from 1000-1500 hours of PAID healthcare experience before they will accept you. This paid experience can be as an RN, paramedic, RT, PT, OT, RPN etc in Canada. Hope this helps :)

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Yeah that is what I was thinking as well. Well I am thankful that I am only 18 and have a lot of time to think about my future. At the same time it fears me because by the time I am done, the process will probably be much more rigorous then it is now. That fears me.

 

Did you end up getting my PM hexonu?

 

Nope, havent gotten anything.

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