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Doing all Undergrad studies Online?


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Hi everyone,

Newbie here.

 

Is it possible to pursue all of the undergrad courses online? It is not possible for me to attend a normal university right now but I would like to get on with my studies as soon as possible. I plan to apply to Medical Schools in Ontario.

 

I know of Athabasca University..but do I have to study from there? Any other great universities I can take courses from? I live in Toronto.

What are the most recommended courses for taking MCAT? I want to learn, not just get it over with just so I can to apply to med school.

 

Thanks in advance!

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Hi Nathan,

Yes, I read that.

 

I would prefer a school in Toronto that I can go to do some labs. Maybe mixing up Athabasca with a school here?

 

Does it matter which courses you take? Or how many courses you need? I am so confused on the "undergraduate studies" part. U of T says they require 3 years towards a Bachelor's program...not sure if taking several bio/chem/physics courses would make me eligible.

 

Can someone give me some pointers? Thanks again!

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Hi Nathan,

Yes, I read that.

 

I would prefer a school in Toronto that I can go to do some labs. Maybe mixing up Athabasca with a school here?

 

Does it matter which courses you take? Or how many courses you need? I am so confused on the "undergraduate studies" part. U of T says they require 3 years towards a Bachelor's program...not sure if taking several bio/chem/physics courses would make me eligible.

 

Can someone give me some pointers? Thanks again!

 

You need the degree (unless you can prove you're a better choice for early admission) which means just taking a few biochem/chem/phys courses won't get you your degree.

 

For your UG degree, whatever it may be, you can take all online courses if you want as long as you meet their required classes (each school has different degree requirements).

 

When it comes to med I would recommend finding which schools accept online courses and which ones don't, as well as any intersection with schools you'd like to attend. Some schools have no course requirements (U of C for example), others require statistics (U of A for example), while some don't require statistics (UBC for example). So courses you take also will affect which schools you're ultimately eligible to apply for. Does that make sense?

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Yes, thanks for clarifying.

 

So what is the difference with applying with undergrad vs having a bachelor's degree? Any pros/cons of each?

 

If you have graduated with a bachelor's degree then you graduated from "undergrad". Undergraduate school is basically the first level of post-secondary school. Anything after a bachelor degree must be obtained in graduate school.

 

Some people apply to med after 2nd or 3rd year, and some get accepted, but you have to have a pretty impressive CV. The majority of people have completed the required 4 years, and have a bachelors degree.

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Oh okay, I am just confused with taking courses (bio/chem/physics) vs getting a degree. Which degree should I work for online to get into med school? Sorry, total newbie!

 

Generally people take a bachelor of science. It allows you to take the required courses for med as well as putting them towards your degree so you aren't put in the position to possibly take another term to meet pre-reqs, but I can't stress this enough, you don't have to take BSc, take something that interests you!

 

You need to be somewhat aware of what med school you wish to attend, like I said everywhere is different. Some examples:

 

U of A - 1 year in English, Biology, Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, physics. 1/2 year in Statistics, biochemistry.

 

U of C - No required courses

 

McGill - 1 year Biology, chemistry, physics. 1/2 year organic chemistry

 

As you can see schools vary in what they require.

 

My recommendation is find the school you wish to take courses through, find what they require for said degree.

 

From there take a look at possible medical schools you wish to attend.

http://www.oxfordseminars.ca/MCAT/mcat_profiles.php

This website seems to have a good all around look at minimum requirements as well as averages.

 

With these two in mind you can plan how you wish to approach everything. Keep in mind you will also need to take the MCAT (assuming you're applying to schools requiring it), but either way I would recommend still taking it, as to not limit yourself.

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Thanks very much. Very useful information.

 

The only thing I was confused about was, Athabasca has a list of popular pre-med courses..I found this by googling "athabasca medical school." So If I were to take all of those courses listed, would I qualify for a degree or just a large mixture of science courses? I don't get if I have to specifically join a "program" or can mix and match science courses as I please..but then I don't know if I would get a degree..do I make sense? :)

 

U of C requires no courses. ?? Yikes! What do they require then? So you don't even require any specific post-secondary education at ALL?

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Thanks very much. Very useful information.

 

The only thing I was confused about was, Athabasca has a list of popular pre-med courses..I found this by googling "athabasca medical school." So If I were to take all of those courses listed, would I qualify for a degree or just a large mixture of science courses? I don't get if I have to specifically join a "program" or can mix and match science courses as I please..but then I don't know if I would get a degree..do I make sense? :)

 

U of C requires no courses. ?? Yikes! What do they require then? So you don't even require any specific post-secondary education at ALL?

 

Can you send a link as to what you're exactly looking at? It isn't the degree itself that allows you access so to speak, it's the credits that come with it, for example, U of A has this on their site:

 

All applicants to the MD program must be registered in or have completed a degree program.

The minimum requirement for admission to our program is the successful completion of at least two (2) full years of transferable post-secondary work (60 units of course weight - 10 full-course equivalents). Of this, 30 units of course weight - five full-course equivalents - must be taken during one academic year. An academic year is September 1 to April 30 inclusive. A full academic year consists of at least 18 units of course weight completed per academic year.

One academic year (fall/winter terms) must contain 30 units of course weight (ucw). The purpose behind the requirement of 30 ucw in one academic year is to assess whether students will be able to handle the course load when registered in the Medicine program.

In most University of Alberta programs where students complete the pre-professional study, a 30-ucw year typically includes five 3-credit courses per fall and winter term. Courses from other institutions are converted to the University of Alberta ucw. Labs that are taken as part of a co-requisite lecture and are reported as separate courses on other institutions' transcripts will not be included in the total course weight. At the U of A, a course with a lab component is reported together with the lecture in the 3 or 6 ucw.

 

People usually go into programs because it makes more sense to gain something after taking your courses (Bachelor of science for example) instead of a whole bunch of courses through say open studies. Also without enrolling in a program most courses aren't available.

 

Schools weigh different sections differently. In general they all look at ECs, GPA, and the MCAT to get you an interview, then your interview plays a part in your rating.

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  • 2 months later...
There is a well known forum member on here who did their whole degree at Athabasca and got in to med school.

 

Why would it be treated any different?

 

Because some school blunt state that it will - Ottawa for one, and maybe at some other schools there is a bias in the holistic formulas they use. At many schools though that is all just irrelevant and add a course is a course (like it should be) :)

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You are aware of someone that took a huge number of them online though - that would be myself :)

 

Of the 85 courses I took at Waterloo about 55 of them were online.

 

Wow, I also have 85 courses credited to my name, although they are from Guelph (plus the transfer credits that Guelph counted towards one of my two degrees). I also have a couple of other courses that I took between my two degrees, but that Guelph didn't give me any transfer credit for.

 

In my case, I ended up with so many for two major reasons:

1. I took a bunch of courses between my two degrees because I enjoy learning in a university setting and because I wanted to be sure I could succeed in nutrition and physiology courses.

2. A lot of the courses in my second degree are only offered once per year, and a bunch of them had prerequisites that I didn't already have. So, to ensure I had a full course load every semester, I ended up taking additional courses that I didn't need for my degree program, but that were of great interest to me (public health, physical activity, nutrition interventions, etc.)

 

I haven't taken quite so many online, although most semesters I've had at least one online course. Most of the courses I took as a non-degree student between my two degrees were also online courses (either through Waterloo, Carleton, Athabasca or Guelph). During my first degree, I also have some courses I took via letter of permission at another university when I went home for the summer to work. I have quite the stack of transcripts to submit when applying for professional programs!

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