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Should I get a BscPA or a MS-NP primary or both ?


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Everyone I ask says they are very similar except np's study a nusing model and pa's study a medicine related model. PAs are required to work with physicians and NPs are not but usually do so I'm not sure which is best for me.

I've done a lot of research and there are A LOT of jobs for NP's in cities,suburbs,rural areas everywhere and for PAs it seems there are few (and fewer in cities outside of hospitals) but enough for the current graduates and its going to grow and their jobs are more versatile (ex.not specifically primary). And I've heard NPs earn more is that true if you work the same hours? And is the shortest path for NP currently a 2year BscN and 2years working in emergency and a 2 year M-NP (6 years total) while for PA it is 2 years (uoft) w. 1 year as a health professional + (a degree to become a health professional ex. a 2year BscN) (5 years total)

The 1 extra year for NP isn't an issue because I get to work inbetween

So here's what I want to do;

I'd like to stay in the GTA and not have to look elsewhere for a job and work in a clinic NOT a hospital I just prefer the close-knitness of a clinic and would like to see some of the same patients again as NPs do at NP run clinics but not necessarily a primary care clinic although I'd be interested in that too

I don't mind working under doctors because ofcourse that may be necessary for the best care but I would prefer the most autonomy I can get and I'm not sure which profession has the most.

I'd like to be able to perform independently some advanced tasks beyond what an RN does. Do physical exams and order and interpret diagnostics, communicate diagnostics and prescribe treatments.

 

I think both NPs and PAs do all of the above but I'm not sure?

Can anyone answer which profession would allow me to do all of the above and in a city setting not rural

 

I'd also like to potentially run my own clinic if that's possible as a NP or (PA w. an external doctor) but not sure if it is in canada yet?

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So are you suggesting the NP instead of PA? And thanks I've done more research and understand the opening up my own practice idea is not possible in Canada is either of them. But do you know if PAs are paaid on salary aswel?

 

I'm not sure how PAs are paid.

 

This is just my opinion and personal suggestion:

1) NP = top of nursing

2) PA = bottom of medicine

Do you want to be called an assistant for the rest of your career?

 

I would choose NP over PA any day.

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I'm not sure how PAs are paid.

 

This is just my opinion and personal suggestion:

1) NP = top of nursing

2) PA = bottom of medicine

Do you want to be called an assistant for the rest of your career?

 

I would choose NP over PA any day.

 

As a physician (with limited experience) I would say that PA is the way to go. Both are excellent but PA's are trained in a more medical model than a nursing model. That being said if you are an NP you will have strong and powerful nursing unions backing you. It really depends if you want to work more like a physician or an advanced skills nurse.

 

Obviously I am biased and physicians will tend to give more autonomy to people that are taught to think in a similar fashion -- but I don't want to ruffle any feathers by saying that is the only and best way to think.

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As a physician (with limited experience) I would say that PA is the way to go. Both are excellent but PA's are trained in a more medical model than a nursing model. That being said if you are an NP you will have strong and powerful nursing unions backing you. It really depends if you want to work more like a physician or an advanced skills nurse.

 

Obviously I am biased and physicians will tend to give more autonomy to people that are taught to think in a similar fashion -- but I don't want to ruffle any feathers by saying that is the only and best way to think.

 

NP doesn't need a physician's permission for autonomy. And it's not advanced nursing skills... they're practicing medicine.

 

PS: I'm studying to become a doc/surgeon.

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If NPs are the top of nursing and PAs are at the bottom of medicine aren't PAs at the top of NPs when it comes to medicine or no??

 

Not that I'm interested in the prestige but for the same length of education I'd like the profession that allows me to take on the most responsibility/leadership.

 

Also mursing your studying to become a doc?

Could you let me know how one goes from nursing to medschool, is a BscN or BscPA valid as an undergraduate program for admissions because I heard nursing courses can't be used in GPAs for med school is that true?

 

Are you taking extra courses/prereqs before applying or are you applying with your BscN?

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NPs are accountable for their own practice and generally have a lot of autonomy. However, they don't outright say that and you'll hear the term "collaborative practice" being thrown around. I suspect it has something to do with appeasing the medical community.

 

In my opinion I would skip both and go straight into medical school. NP education is highly dependant on your past experience and I'm finding that those with less than 4 years in an acute setting are having trouble staying afloat. Also, prepare yourself for copious amounts of "fluff".

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Good advice what do you mean by fluff ?

 

NP program is divided into two years

 

1st year: has nothing to do with medicine. It'll be about nursing theory, research, health policy, ethics, statistics

 

2nd year: this is the actual NP program which involves medicine with pathophysiology, pharmacology, ...

 

1st year is definitely fluff

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Hey Smjo21,

 

I'm a second year PA student and I'm not going to tell you what's better. What I will tell you is that if you truely want to know what each does or is like, find someone that is in that position and ask them specifically about their career. Don't get information from third parties that aren't in the profession and know nothing of it. Getting options from Physicians are fine, as long as they themselves have actually worked with a PA or NP, to have a valid viewpoint.

 

Good luck :)

 

Everyone I ask says they are very similar except np's study a nusing model and pa's study a medicine related model. PAs are required to work with physicians and NPs are not but usually do so I'm not sure which is best for me.

I've done a lot of research and there are A LOT of jobs for NP's in cities,suburbs,rural areas everywhere and for PAs it seems there are few (and fewer in cities outside of hospitals) but enough for the current graduates and its going to grow and their jobs are more versatile (ex.not specifically primary). And I've heard NPs earn more is that true if you work the same hours? And is the shortest path for NP currently a 2year BscN and 2years working in emergency and a 2 year M-NP (6 years total) while for PA it is 2 years (uoft) w. 1 year as a health professional + (a degree to become a health professional ex. a 2year BscN) (5 years total)

The 1 extra year for NP isn't an issue because I get to work inbetween

So here's what I want to do;

I'd like to stay in the GTA and not have to look elsewhere for a job and work in a clinic NOT a hospital I just prefer the close-knitness of a clinic and would like to see some of the same patients again as NPs do at NP run clinics but not necessarily a primary care clinic although I'd be interested in that too

I don't mind working under doctors because ofcourse that may be necessary for the best care but I would prefer the most autonomy I can get and I'm not sure which profession has the most.

I'd like to be able to perform independently some advanced tasks beyond what an RN does. Do physical exams and order and interpret diagnostics, communicate diagnostics and prescribe treatments.

 

I think both NPs and PAs do all of the above but I'm not sure?

Can anyone answer which profession would allow me to do all of the above and in a city setting not rural

 

I'd also like to potentially run my own clinic if that's possible as a NP or (PA w. an external doctor) but not sure if it is in canada yet?

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