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Men working in Ultrasound/Sonography


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I'm trying to figure out what to do with my life/career.

 

Right now I am looking heavily at nursing, but am also currently on a waiting list to begin a radiologic tech program (x-ray) next fall, 2015.

 

I am also looking at ultrasound/sonography since the pay is better. I would need to go back and upgrade some marks. My concern is, its clearly a female dominant profession, is anybody (or know anyone) that works in ultrasound as a male and how comfortable they feel doing their job?

 

I would personally want to do cardiovascular ultrasound, but would likely have to start in a position that may involve doing transvaginal and other personal tests which most patients may not want a male doing.

 

any thoughts?

 

I'll also add, I'm 24, have a Bachelors in Kinesiology, and am by no means straight A student, I would have to probably retake 2 years of univ to get into the other programs I want to take.

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Speaking as someone who, by virtue of having two kids and a fertility problem, has had a whole lot of ultrasounds, I really couldn't give a rat's behind whether the sono tech was male or female. No more than I care about my physician's gender, anyway, which isn't much. I'm sure there are women who would be uncomfortable, but there would also likely be men who may be uncomfortable with a female tech for some scans.

 

As I have a large sampling of women who have had ultrasounds available to me, I'll ask them for their opinions and get back to you.

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I'm trying to figure out what to do with my life/career.

 

Right now I am looking heavily at nursing, but am also currently on a waiting list to begin a radiologic tech program (x-ray) next fall, 2015.

 

I am also looking at ultrasound/sonography since the pay is better. I would need to go back and upgrade some marks. My concern is, its clearly a female dominant profession, is anybody (or know anyone) that works in ultrasound as a male and how comfortable they feel doing their job?

 

I would personally want to do cardiovascular ultrasound, but would likely have to start in a position that may involve doing transvaginal and other personal tests which most patients may not want a male doing.

 

any thoughts?

 

I'll also add, I'm 24, have a Bachelors in Kinesiology, and am by no means straight A student, I would have to probably retake 2 years of univ to get into the other programs I want to take.

 

Not sure it matters how dominated it is - actually I don't think I like that term as the ratio is not 99:1 etc :) At out centre as a radiology resident I work with several male sonographers who love their jobs. It actually looks like a really interesting health field job.

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Yes, men are less prevalent in sonography, but actually a good proportion of the ones I've met are working in hospitals with a heavy gyne case load. In my experience, if the patient declines transvaginal scanning, they simply do not want it regardless of who performs it, male or female. There may be a rare occasion where a female tech is requested (mostly for religious reasons). In all cases where a male tech or radiologist is doing transvaginal scanning, a female chaperone is present.

 

To provide perspective, there are plenty of radiologists who are men who scan breast/TV/etc., and female sonographers do scrotal ultrasound all the time.

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I completed X-ray training before heading into med. In hindsight, I would have gone into ultrasound instead if I were to do it over again: the pay is a higher, also the job prospect is MUCH better. I remember looking up job postings prior to graduation, and virtually every hospital website has one or two listings for ultrasound tech, but nothing for X-ray tech. On the topic of male ultrasound tech, the hospital where I trained at as an X-ray tech had a 50:50 split in their ultrasound team. It's not a female profession at all. If anything I would say nursing is more undeservingly stereotyped to be a female dominant profession.

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Just to add my 2cents, I'm also a woman who has had numerous ultrasounds and would have no problem with a male tech. My sister who is quite religious has a male tech at the hospital here in town and has never experienced any problem. When you're about to give birth, your body just becomes an open book for about 10+ medical professionals and really, you don't care.

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Just to add my 2cents, I'm also a woman who has had numerous ultrasounds and would have no problem with a male tech. My sister who is quite religious has a male tech at the hospital here in town and has never experienced any problem. When you're about to give birth, your body just becomes an open book for about 10+ medical professionals and really, you don't care.

 

Yup, that.

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Just to add my 2cents, I'm also a woman who has had numerous ultrasounds and would have no problem with a male tech. My sister who is quite religious has a male tech at the hospital here in town and has never experienced any problem. When you're about to give birth, your body just becomes an open book for about 10+ medical professionals and really, you don't care.

 

My medical education would say otherwise. I was kicked out of the room by plenty of women during my OB rotations deliveries because they "weren't comfortable" with me being there. Mind you I think a lot of that comes down to just how your resident/staff advocates on your behalf.

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My medical education would say otherwise. I was kicked out of the room by plenty of women during my OB rotations deliveries because they "weren't comfortable" with me being there. Mind you I think a lot of that comes down to just how your resident/staff advocates on your behalf.

 

the only counter I guess is you were probably pretty useless in the room :) The actual sonographer has an actual role in helping the patient directly and isn't just for their own purposes.

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My medical education would say otherwise. I was kicked out of the room by plenty of women during my OB rotations deliveries because they "weren't comfortable" with me being there. Mind you I think a lot of that comes down to just how your resident/staff advocates on your behalf.

 

I expect it was the nursing staff emphasizing to the patients that they could refuse to have you there.

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I expect it was the nursing staff emphasizing to the patients that they could refuse to have you there.

 

yeah that can play a big role - how you are introduced makes a huge difference - the "framing problem". On my oby/gen rotation the staff was very supportive and I think that is why I had such a good experience. Most clerks don't get to deliver 40+ babies - that was in big part because of how things were structured.

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