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Got Selected At 2 Places.. Where Should I Go?


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Hey Fellow future doctors!

So I just received emails from universities I had applied to telling me I've been selected in their programs but i'm a bit confused where I should go.

So I applied to 5 places but got a response from only 2(fortunately the ones on the top of my list).

 

1) University of Alberta - Physiology( Bsc. with specialisation )

2) University of Calgary - Bachelor of Health science( honours in bio medical sciences )

 

Calgary is my hometown but i've heard university of alberta is good too so i'm comfortable with both the places but the confusion here is about the programs.

What program between these two would give you a higher GPA and would he more interesting to study?

 

Please share your thoughts!

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What is interesting to you may be different from what's interesting to me or others. With the information you've given, you've given very little to us, and we can't really evaluate your interests aside from science, possibly in human health.

 

Why don't you look at the course descriptions of the courses you'd take at all your choices. That'd be a good start.

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What is interesting to you may be different from what's interesting to me or others. With the information you've given, you've given very little to us, and we can't really evaluate your interests aside from science, possibly in human health.

 

Why don't you look at the course descriptions of the courses you'd take at all your choices. That'd be a good start.

Thanks for your response!

Actually that's my problem I really don't know what would he good for me.

 

I've actually loved the study of human anatomy and physiology both equally since i was in grade 8. I started with some kaplan stuff my cousin gave me after he cleared the usmle although i couldn't understand any of that, the pictures and all were interesting lol..

In a nutshell I really like studying the human body and the course description for both these courses is quite the same but one the one at uni of alberta is an actual pre med program whereas the other is just a health science program with specialisation in bio med sciences.

 

I got 92% in my grade 12 first half so I think difficulty level won't be a problem for me but what do you think would be a scoring subject. I have no knowledge of the health science subjects neither the physiology course.

 

Both have different course loads(god knows what that means) and I really appreciate clarity at any level on this dilemma.

Thanks!

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Hey Fellow future doctors!

So I just received emails from universities I had applied to telling me I've been selected in their programs but i'm a bit confused where I should go.

So I applied to 5 places but got a response from only 2(fortunately the ones on the top of my list).

 

1) University of Alberta - Physiology( Bsc. with specialisation )

2) University of Calgary - Bachelor of Health science( honours in bio medical sciences )

 

Calgary is my hometown but i've heard university of alberta is good too so i'm comfortable with both the places but the confusion here is about the programs.

What program between these two would give you a higher GPA and would he more interesting to study?

 

Please share your thoughts!

 

Hi ppreetgill,

 

I doubt that there are many people that have been in both programs, so it would be difficult to find anyone that can compare the difficulty of them. There are a number of people that have gotten into medicine by taking physiology at U of A (which isn't an actual premed program btw) and also many that have taken the Bachelor of Health Sciences at Calgary.

 

Since you've weighted both programs equally, start looking at other factors. For example...

1. Would you rather live at home or would you rather move to Edmonton?

2. Do you have a place to stay in Edmonton (if you chose U of A) already or would you have to find one?

3. Do you prefer green and yellow or red and white? <-- only joking about this one of course (I might even be wrong on U of C's colours)  ;)

 

Another thing to mention is that the program that you choose now isn't written in stone for four years. You can always change your mind. For example, I know people that have started out in physiology and then changed to neuroscience or started in general science and then switched to a specialization, etc. Some people even switch from Arts to Science or Science to Education or Business to Engineering, etc. There is no specific "premed" program.

 

I hope that helps.  :)

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Thanks for your response!

Actually that's my problem I really don't know what would he good for me.

 

I've actually loved the study of human anatomy and physiology both equally since i was in grade 8. I started with some kaplan stuff my cousin gave me after he cleared the usmle although i couldn't understand any of that, the pictures and all were interesting lol..

In a nutshell I really like studying the human body and the course description for both these courses is quite the same but one the one at uni of alberta is an actual pre med program whereas the other is just a health science program with specialisation in bio med sciences.

 

I got 92% in my grade 12 first half so I think difficulty level won't be a problem for me but what do you think would be a scoring subject. I have no knowledge of the health science subjects neither the physiology course.

 

Both have different course loads(god knows what that means) and I really appreciate clarity at any level on this dilemma.

Thanks!

  Ohhh i would be very careful with that statement. Just because you did well in high school does not necessarily mean you will do well in University. What worked for you in high school does not mean it will work for you in University. University is a different beast. I would say the majority of us have had to completely change the way we study once in university, because what worked for us in high school didn't  work for us in university. I am saying this purely out of experience, lol. In my opinion, high school, for lack of a better term, is a joke. Though, i do wish you the best of luck!

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It doesn't matter where you chose as long as you keep your grades up. Remember...GPA is king

 

If I was in your position I would chose Calgary because i'll be closer to home and can live at home instead of moving away. 

Unless you want to whole "living away" experience (which i found to be over rated). 

 

In terms of the degrees, i'm sure most of the courses overlap because they sound so similar.

 

If I had to do it over again, I would do a degree that would best help me prepare for professional school. 

Which is to take as many courses as I can that relates to the medical world. Ex. anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, histology, embryology, neurology etc. 

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I would stay far away from honours degrees. They don't matter at all if you're trying to get into medicine; they're only good for lowering your GPA.

If not honours then should I just go for a general Biology course? It sounds really boring studying anything else in biology other than human stuff lol. Like botony and stuff in bio.

I'll keep that in mind though! Thanks!

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It doesn't matter where you chose as long as you keep your grades up. Remember...GPA is king

 

If I was in your position I would chose Calgary because i'll be closer to home and can live at home instead of moving away.

Unless you want to whole "living away" experience (which i found to be over rated).

 

In terms of the degrees, i'm sure most of the courses overlap because they sound so similar.

 

If I had to do it over again, I would do a degree that would best help me prepare for professional school.

Which is to take as many courses as I can that relates to the medical world. Ex. anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, histology, embryology, neurology etc.

Exactly! GPA is king! But that's what I want to know what program would give me high GPA? I mean not out of these two but in general. What did you take in undergrad sir? You sound very wise.
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If I had to do it over again, I would do a degree that would best help me prepare for professional school. 

Which is to take as many courses as I can that relates to the medical world. Ex. anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, histology, embryology, neurology etc. 

^ That's a good plan! It will prepare you for the MCAT, which is there to judge your preparedness for medical school, too.

 

Maybe I'm mistaken, but I think it's important to take something you really enjoy. If you are interested in what you study, you will probably do well. Of course I could be wrong - I am biased because of my own experience; I studied business and resented almost all of my business courses, all of which I typically achieved lower grades in than my science courses (excepting one commerce course and one science course).

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The place where I study has a 33% passing scale unlike the standardised 50% scale all over Canada. It means my syllabus is 34% more and have to work harder than other kids to get a 90+ average.

 

Sorry to sound harsh here but no one cares about how "hard" your high school or private school is. 

I went into undergrad with a mid 80s average from high school and have seem students with high 90s fail out that came from self-proclaimed "hard" high schools. 

It's funny....you'll see posts here with high school kids say "I have a 95% average from high school" then after 1st year make posts like: "I failed 2 courses what do i do now?" 

 

Exactly! GPA is king! But that's what I want to know what program would give me high GPA? I mean not out of these two but in general. What did you take in undergrad sir? You sound very wise.

 

There is no program that will allow you to get a high GPA without hard work. 

 

I recommend you take what interests you and have an open mind while going into university. 

Too many people have the "medical school tunnel vision" syndrome. 

 

It's good to have a goal but don't let that be all you focus on. You don't know what you're going to like unless you get exposure to it. 

 

FYI-I went to Western for undergrad. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Have you really researched the two different programs? I just quickly surveyed the two, looking at the course progression and descriptions. They seem similar in some ways, but quite different. Both cover the basics, so Year 1 is nearly identical, and Year 2 will always have overlap. The Biomed one seems to build more on the research, lab, stats and related skills than the Physiology one. My sense of it from reading was that it seemed much more of an "integrated" program than the Physiology one. That's not necessarily a good or bad thing, it's just a difference. The Physiology one (not sure if I was looking at the right page, I'm guessing it is the Physiology and Development Bio one) seems more broad, and also includes courses not focused on humans. 

 

This is based on maybe 3 minutes on each website... I understand the desire to get some insight on your choice, and it's good you realize it is an important choice, but I would suggest taking the time to really compare the two programs. If the course descriptions don't make sense to you, Wikipedia can probably tell you the broad strokes of what "topic X" is about... Nobody here can tell you what you will be more interested in. While GPA is king, actually enjoying the program you are in is important to getting that GPA.

 

And, yes, where you live is important. Will moving to a new city make it harder for you to get involved in ECs (you don't know what's available), or will not knowing anyone compel you to do so more? Will you be super distracted living in res, making Year 1 an academic struggle? 

 

 

Are there clubs / exchange programs / research labs (etc.) that one school has and the other doesn't? 

 

I can think of so many more questions, but the bottom line is that you've got to figure out what's important to you beyond getting a high GPA. Yes, a high GPA is extremely important, but I can't imagine getting it at one school will be infinitely harder than at another school. If you like the environment you are in, are involved in things you like, and enjoy what you study, you will have a much better chance of doing well.

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It's funny....you'll see posts here with high school kids say "I have a 95% average from high school" then after 1st year make posts like: "I failed 2 courses what do i do now?" 

 

 

I had phenomenal high school grades and crash landed in first year. Bringing up my GPA and being competitive in my applications is something I'm still having to deal with, nearly 10 years later.

 

My advice: If you were labelled gifted, or even if not, but were able to achieve a great mark in courses without studying your absolute hardest, then you need to slap yourself because none of that matters at all. Having been a first year TA, I made it a point to ask students who came to see me what their high school grades were like - more often than not, those having a lot of difficulty/poor work habits were those labelled "gifted" and never had to work hard academically, but scored 90%+ regardless.

 

Once I even had a student's mother phone me, asking how the I (as the one who graded her exam) had the audacity to give her daughter a 55% on her calculus midterm. I can still remember the extreme hubris in her voice, "She's gifted! Are you gifted?"

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Go for the university that will give you the better social experience. Life is about enjoyment, don't worry too much about what will prepare you best for medical school, because after first semester med everyone is on an equal playing field anyways. Just make sure you still work hard during undergrad and get good grades.

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Have you really researched the two different programs? I just quickly surveyed the two, looking at the course progression and descriptions. They seem similar in some ways, but quite different. Both cover the basics, so Year 1 is nearly identical, and Year 2 will always have overlap. The Biomed one seems to build more on the research, lab, stats and related skills than the Physiology one. My sense of it from reading was that it seemed much more of an "integrated" program than the Physiology one. That's not necessarily a good or bad thing, it's just a difference. The Physiology one (not sure if I was looking at the right page, I'm guessing it is the Physiology and Development Bio one) seems more broad, and also includes courses not focused on humans.

 

This is based on maybe 3 minutes on each website... I understand the desire to get some insight on your choice, and it's good you realize it is an important choice, but I would suggest taking the time to really compare the two programs. If the course descriptions don't make sense to you, Wikipedia can probably tell you the broad strokes of what "topic X" is about... Nobody here can tell you what you will be more interested in. While GPA is king, actually enjoying the program you are in is important to getting that GPA.

 

And, yes, where you live is important. Will moving to a new city make it harder for you to get involved in ECs (you don't know what's available), or will not knowing anyone compel you to do so more? Will you be super distracted living in res, making Year 1 an academic struggle?

 

 

Are there clubs / exchange programs / research labs (etc.) that one school has and the other doesn't?

 

I can think of so many more questions, but the bottom line is that you've got to figure out what's important to you beyond getting a high GPA. Yes, a high GPA is extremely important, but I can't imagine getting it at one school will be infinitely harder than at another school. If you like the environment you are in, are involved in things you like, and enjoy what you study, you will have a much better chance of doing well.

You da real mvp

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Unless you are rich, or on a free ride, go to the cheapest option (provided you expect your GPA to be the same).

 

When you get to the point of almost being done residency and compound interest has been building for 10-15 years, then you really will appreciate spending less up front.

 

Just my thoughts based on my past 10-15 years of post secondary training.

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