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Good News? Moo


Guest kellyl20

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yup! I'll be at the UofA for family med! I was hoping for UBC (home), but I'm really excited as I really liked the program and they seem to have a really good academic program there, as I plan to do some EM research.

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docbil,

 

The US is a great place to train and be a doctor--if you are sure you don't wanna do primary care which is what I thought I wanted for sure. But then I realized I really liked family practice and so coming back to Canada was natural. I woulda most likely stayed in the US had I decided to do my second choice--anesthesia.

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Family practice is primary care in Canada. Primary care is general internal medicine, general pediatrics, family medicine and some include ob/gyne in the US. Family medicine is not big in the US... the system is very specialist-driven. It's not that the system is bad down there. It's just different.

 

I initially wanted to do rad onc, and wanted to be in academics so I wanted to go to a very academic place. Then, things changed and I decided to do anesthesia, and then FP.

 

Its not that I didn't get my second choice of anesthesia, I just ranked all FP programs above it, and I ended up matching into FP so of course then I can't match into anesthesia.

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Guest Regina063

Hi,

 

Is it definitely possible to do a residency in Canada after attending med school in the us? No problems coming back here? Also, are family medicine residencies hard to get into?? (as family medicine is what I think I would be interested in, if I ever do get accepted somewhere)

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Guest kellyl20

Good for you Moo. UA is a good academic place and the citizens are friendly around town. Never seen so many people wearing jeans, the whole city practically.

 

Another question which I have forgotten the answer to, was it about $50 K US per year for med education including living expenses?

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Yeah, I'd say it was pretty easy to get back up here. Even for anesthesia, I had quite a few interview offers (I only went to two, UT and McGill). I also know of someone a few years back who graduated from my school and matched at Sick Kids for peds. The point is, for whatever reason you decide to study down here (whether it be for cultural reasons, the fact that you like the school and/or city, or you wanted to do something academic but changed your mind afterwards, or you couldn't get into a Canadian school), you will be able to match back to Canada.

 

Cost of education varies. I lived downtown in the 3rd largest city in America so cost of living was expensive. The first year was the toughest cuz the dollar was so low but after that things were manageable.

I'd say 50k is a conservative estimate for most places including living expenses. If I had gone to Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee (one of the other places I was accepted at), tuition, living expenses and stuff woulda been about 40k. So, like Canada, you can choose to live in Vancouver or Toronto and pay a bundle, or you can go to a smaller town and save some money. For me, it was worth the extra dough cuz I wanted to live some place exciting and experience something I couldn't in Canada. After all, you're only young once.

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So, your medical education is over at Northwestern. If you could do it all over again would you choose another american school? And would you recommend the school to someone like me? What tests did you have to do to come back to Canada to do a residency?

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Guest siobhansiobhan

That's going to change -

ONtario alone has an extra 100 spots around, Northern is about to start graduating people, and UBC is also increasing school spots -

 

My prediction is that these spots may dry up.

As well: Gov't often asking for more spots for foreign-trained doctors - another factor to consider....to advantage.

 

Siobhan

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Guest kellyl20

The above were residency spots left over from this year's Carm's match, so how would increasing the # of med students

help unless the # the residency spots increase also. Calgary had an increase but I do not know for the rest of the schools.

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Guest siobhansiobhan

Spots remain empty in 2006.

Increase number of med students, and by 2010,

No spots remain empty by 2010 - that helps for more home-grown doctors.

 

What might help for foreign-trained is that gov't wanted to see a way to stream-line cdn qualification. that may no longer be an issue, though, given that there will be no spots left because there are more doctors. I do know about the rest of the schools I mentioned. Interesting to hear about Calgary as well.

 

So, my prediction is that there will be no benefit for foreign-trained. Gov't wanted to make easier only to have more doctors. There will be more doctors, therefore no more need.

 

Something further to consider: if u.s. trained get to be in first round of matching, perhaps this is not an issue for u.s. training.

 

 

However, serious issue for re-entry from caribbean schools, especially because as canadians, hard to get sponsored for a u.s. spot without u.s. working papers.

 

Siobhan

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I think if you are going to go foreign, go to the US if you can. Even in provinces which I supposedly wasn't allowed to match in the first round (Sask, NS) I got interviews from their anes programs (I just never went). One thing I found that was surprising was that I didn't get as many US anes interviews that I thought I would. And a lot of times that I did get interviews at decent places, I was told that I was not going to be able to secure an H1, making it pointless to go to those interviews. I didn't want to sacrifice program quality (because it varies so much in the US) and location just for a stupid visa. Many who go to the caribbean and are Canadian end up at community programs in some random state. I don't mean to sound elitist but I really didn't want that to be me so it made the decision to come back to Canada a little easier.

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Guest QuestionMan23213

hey moo,

how did u find the us mle? Im studying med in the UK and am hoping to make it into the states eventually. Do you know if ppl from england have a decent shot at residencies in the states (Im a Canadian citizen)? Do foreign grads have to score even higher than domestic students on the exam to match for the same specialities? Will a score in the low 80s make you competitive?

 

 

good luck at UA! Im glad you matched where u wanted.

Thanks moo,

QMAn

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Here is my issue... I wanna practice in the US and I want to do med. school there too. but I dont wanna have to go to med. school in the US and then find out that I wont get the residency I wanted and have to come back to the US. Is it really worth it to go the US then????? I dont want to gamble on whether or not I will get my residency choice. Is there anything I can do now to get the visa/H1 problems out of the way so that I wouldnt have to encounter this??

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The USMLE was fine. I didn't do as well as I had hoped but I still got around average for US students (my classmates are crazy in that they score like usually one SD above the mean). So anyway, its not that I couldn't have matched in the US. There are many programs in the US that offered me the H1 (Northwestern, Wayne State to name a few) but I was picky about location (wanted to be closer to the west coast) and the west coast programs tend to be 1) artificially competitive to begin with. I say this because the quality of the programs aren't that great (with the exception of like UW, UCSF, Stanford, UCLA) but everyone wants to be in California so it's competitive; 2) tend to only take people who are from California or have a great desire to be there; 3) tend not to offer the H1.

 

As for coming from the UK, I don't think you'll have a problem securing a residency. The question is where. Like I said before, for me, I was very picky about location and to a lesser extent, program quality. I didn't want to spend another four years in Chicago or in Boston or in NYC far away from my family. There's a huge difference for me in being able to get on a plane and be home in one hour versus taking a five hour plane ride across the continent. There are enough programs such that you will match if you aren't looking for anything too competitive and you're not too picky about where you wanna be.

 

Another thing I had to consider was the fact that for anesthesia, the residencies are not transferrable between Canada and the US. So had I gotten the J1 I would've had to go back to Canada for two years before being able to come down again, i.e., be unemployed for two years. A lot of good programs offered the J1 to me, but because of this situation, I had to decline it. If you do something else, you may not encounter this problem. (Please don't ask me what residencies are transferrable and which ones are not; this changes on a yearly basis and I can't keep track of all 60-something specialties.)

 

If you wanna eventually practice medicine in the US you should definitely come down here. If you graduate from a US med school, and you are Canadian, you will be somewhat disadvantaged but if you do well in med school, do well on the boards, you probably will get into somewhere where you want to if you're not too picky. Canadians can and have matched into competitive residencies and gotten the H1. I don't want to paint this doom and gloom picture for you because it's really not like that.

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When you say competitive residencies, are they generally the ones with the highest salaries??? And in the end does it really matter, and if so, how would it matter, as to which med. school you do a residency at??

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Guest QuestionMan23213

hey moo, thanks for the reply. i appreciate it.

 

 

joshto,

although competitive residencies may provide high salaries, the level of competition may also depend on other factors like lifestyle, demand for doctors in that field, and the # of available places per year. Money alone wont dictate which specialties are the most competitive.

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Guest mesoderm
Canadians can and have matched into competitive residencies and gotten the H1

 

 

Are they biased if you need a visa? In other words, do they choose you and then think about the Visa situation later? Would some competitive residency programs just toss your application out because they don't want to deal with your visa situation b/c there are many other US citizens wanting in who don't require visas?

 

(I'm referring to Canadians who studied at US med-schools)

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Yes, there are programs who will not offer you an interview based on your visa status. There will be a question on your residency app regarding visa status. I believe if you put J1 on there, residency programs will take a better view of your app. I have been declined interviews based on my visa status. Once, a school called me a month later after having offered me an interview saying they had to cancel my interview because I wanted an H1. Again, there are enough schools that will offer you an H1 that you should have no problems matching; you'll just have to be less picky than the average US applicant about where you wanna be.

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Guest sharonM2006

Hey everyone

 

Am planning on writing my mcat this summer and applying to canadian and us med schools. Do you think this will cause me to have a lower chance of getting in to us schools since they will receive my mcat scores so late.

 

Thanks

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