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Hey there fellow premeds!

I hope you've had a great new year and a merry Christmas! I was also hoping to seek some help regarding the MCAT calculation and assessment under the Academic requirements.

So their website states that 13 out of 70 points for their process for interview selection is dedicated to the individual's MCAT score. It can be found here: 

http://www.med.ualberta.ca/programs/md/admissions/applying/selection-process

 

Also if we check the statistics for successful applicant pool for the class of 2018, the mean MCAT score is states as 11.59 for the 2/3 year pool. This can be found here:

http://www.med.ualberta.ca/programs/md/admissions/applying/entering-statistics

 

So my question is, how is this score calculated?

I understand that 11.59 is actually 34.8/45 if this is the average of the three sections. 

So 11.59/15 would mean a score of 10.04/13 based on their evaluation. 

Is this so? 

If it is, then it would correct to conclude that MCAT actually doesn't mean that much since an increase of 1 point on the MCAT out of 45 would just increase the score by 0.285 on their application.  :confused:  :confused: . 

 

It's quite sad since the MCAT is actually my strength. 

Anyways I'd be glad if proved wrong  :P , so please give me your valuable input.

 

Thanking you in advance. :lol:  :lol:  :lol:

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Myself is first time applied to Alberta U. And hope to have the answer too.

 

Please correct me if I'm wrong, pre-interview cGPA 27%, MCAT 13%, ECs/activities 30%, I assumed your math is the way they calculated,

 

cGPA score = cGPA / 4.0 * 27, for OOP and most applicants cGPA is 3.7 to 4.0, so cGPA score is about 25~27

 

MCAT score = total MCAT / 45 * 13, since most applicants MCAT between 30~40, so MCAT score is about 8.6 ~ 11.6

 

Even MCAT weights 13% and GPA weights 27%, actually GPA high and low only 2 score points different, but MCAT high and low is 3 score points different.

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Myself is first time applied to Alberta U. And hope to have the answer too.

 

Please correct me if I'm wrong, pre-interview cGPA 27%, MCAT 13%, ECs/activities 30%, I assumed your math is the way they calculated,

 

cGPA score = cGPA / 4.0 * 27, for OOP and most applicants cGPA is 3.7 to 4.0, so cGPA score is about 25~27

 

MCAT score = total MCAT / 45 * 13, since most applicants MCAT between 30~40, so MCAT score is about 8.6 ~ 11.6

 

Even MCAT weights 13% and GPA weights 27%, actually GPA high and low only 2 score points different, but MCAT high and low is 3 score points different.

 

Thanks for your insight! 

Technically that is correct but talking practically, the maximum possible MCAT is around 39-40 but only a few applicants would be in that range so that 3 points of variation would be more like around 2 points if we only ignore the extremes.

So the maximum weight-age is actually given to the ECs although looking at the maximum and average score for the last year, i think around 8.5/30 was the average and 14/30 was the maximum score, the variation is very little there too. Practically I would deduce the three sections have equally allocated weight-age although ECs might have a negligible but a subtle exceeding variance as compared to the others.

 

Would be great to hear what others have to say about this. 

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I'm not sure if it's true, but I have heard that U of A calculates the points for GPA using the following formula:

 

((GPA - 3.3)/0.7)*27

 

I'm not sure how U of A will look at ECs this year. Scores have normally been quite low in the past. U of A med has the reputation of a high GPA school (the average last year was around 3.9). You can see why if it's true that they use the formula above.

 

As far as I know, there is no special formula for the MCAT weighting. They just take the score out of 45 and then multiply by 13. 

 

ppreetgill, how do you know that the MCAT will be your strength? I'm just curious.  :) By the time that you apply, you'll be writing the 2015 version of the MCAT so it will no longer be scored out of 45.

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Thanks, Friendly Magpei, your

 

GPA score = (cGPA-3.3)/0.7*27 is very insightful, if it's true, to be fair, then 

 

MCAT score should be (MCAT - 30)/15*13, assumed minimum MCAT is 30, or

MCAT score = (MCAT - 27)/18*13 if minimum MCAT is 27.

 

But I'm an OOP applicant, what can I say. They make rules, we pay to play their games.

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I'm not sure if it's true, but I have heard that U of A calculates the points for GPA using the following formula:

 

((GPA - 3.3)/0.7)*27

 

I'm not sure how U of A will look at ECs this year. Scores have normally been quite low in the past. U of A med has the reputation of a high GPA school (the average last year was around 3.9). You can see why if it's true that they use the formula above.

 

As far as I know, there is no special formula for the MCAT weighting. They just take the score out of 45 and then multiply by 13.

 

ppreetgill, how do you know that the MCAT will be your strength? I'm just curious. :) By the time that you apply, you'll be writing the 2015 version of the MCAT so it will no longer be scored out of 45.

Thanks for your valuable input! I'll be applying as a 2nd year student so the formula for me would be more like {(GPA-3.7)/0.3}*27. All I can do now is hope for a is a 4.00 GPA :P

 

And the reason why my MCAT is my strength is actually a very odd one. I did my grade 12 from India where the high school system is very different. Unlike Canada, we have to take admission tests for various colleges which require a very high level of science knowledge. The level of these tests for professional schools are same as university level in Canada because they are direct entry tests, you just start doing law or medicine right out of highschool. Usually people take 2-3 years to prepare for these tests. I was studying under that curriculum for the past 2 years and preparing for medical school in India, everything took a turn and I had to come back to Canada (it's my homeland, not India). Alfter having looked at the prep books out there for MCAT and also the science courses in college, they seem like a cakewalk for me now after studying under that rigorous curriculum. I know every minute detail of all the topics in different subjects being tested on the MCAT like the back of my hand except for psych and socio. As far as the CARS section, I read allot, like allot. Atleast 2 lengthy novels a week although english is my second language and I learned it just a while ago. I've been consistently scoring 35+ on almost all the AAMC practice tests and have completed the EK1001 series. I'll actually write the MCAT in 2016 and apply right after that so I have about 1 year to prep for socio and psyc. I'll start with college this september in Kinesiology and hope to get a 4.0 :P.

 

I know what's coming next,"you're too paranoid, you're worrying about stuff too early" etc etc but I actually love studying science. E.g i got a kick

after studying about the bohr effect of cardiovascular system in grade 11. Lol

 

I know this is a ton of useless information for you but hope it might have entertained you a bit. Haha

 

Thanks again for your response and if you're right then I would have to work for that 4.0.!

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Do you really? ;)

I sense sarcasm haha!

Actually Sir reading different genres written in different time periods of history does help allot! But being practical, I'd only recommend it if you have atleast a year before your MCAT. For e.g I had a little problem with the passages related to American Political History but after reading a few autobiographies written by some of the presidents or their subordinates, it helped me quite a bit. You get a sense of familiarity with the structure of the passages. Though reading popular fiction helped me the most.

:)

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On 1/5/2015 at 5:44 PM, ppreetgill said:

I sense sarcasm haha!

Actually Sir reading different genres written in different time periods of history does help allot! But being practical, I'd only recommend it if you have atleast a year before your MCAT. For e.g I had a little problem with the passages related to American Political History but after reading a few autobiographies written by some of the presidents or their subordinates, it helped me quite a bit. You get a sense of familiarity with the structure of the passages. Though reading popular fiction helped me the most.

:)

.

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you idiot, HarveySpencer was insulting you because you did not know that a lot was spelled "a lot" a very elementary mistake..a person who reads a lot should have easily learned to spell that...or at least detect basic sarcasm afterwords when the word was highlighted three times..

Whoa dude calm down. I'm sorry and thankyou for correcting me. I didn't know this was actually a mistake! LOL! Though i learned english 3 years ago. Thanks though.
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you idiot, HarveySpencer was insulting you because you did not know that a lot was spelled "a lot" a very elementary mistake..a person who reads a lot should have easily learned to spell that...or at least detect basic sarcasm afterwords when the word was highlighted three times..

Whoa dude calm down. I'm sorry and thankyou for correcting me. I didn't know this was actually a mistake! LOL! Though i learned english 3 years ago. Thanks though.
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you really edited your post just now after I called you out on your inability to detect simple sarcasm to post "I sense sarcasm" at the start of the post. And you always liked your own posts. You are pathetic.

I edited it to correct some other mistakes in grammar. I wrote that originally because a wink is a universal sign of sarcasm if it follows a question. Chill bro. My english is not that good I admit it and I'm not even good with technology, might've been a mistake. Take a deep breath.
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Let's go back to how GPA, MCAT and ECs/activities were scored for 27%, 13% and 30%, should we? Any insightful info?

I asked one of my cousins who applied to alberta med school in 2013 and got an interview. She said nowhere was the formula disclosed(or she didn't care asking for it) but she mentions that the formula mentioned by friendly magpie makes more sense since in this way, the scoring is more practical because in the earlier posts you calculated the variation of 2 points by each applicant which is totally incoherent with the 27% and 13% for the GPA and MCAT. If you get what I mean.
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With the formula we thought it was, the variation is by 2 points in GPA, 3 points in MCAT and 2 points for ECs let's assume. So the actual percentage of pre-interview score would be something like 20% for GPA, 30% for MCAT and 20% for the ECs which is different from the official numbers of 27,13 and 30 given on their website. The 30% remaining would be for the interview. This hardly makes any sense if we see the admission process page on their site.

 

I think friendly magpie has given us the correct formula afterall.

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I really like to know is, if only considered GPA and MCAT, who will have better chance to get an interview invitation? Especially for OOP applicants.

 

A. GPA 3.9 and MCAT 32

B. GPA 3.8 and MCAT 35

C. GPA 3.7 and MCAT 38

 

Any input ?

Under the 4 year pool assuming the minimum MCAT of 30 according to friendly magpie's formular

A. Would have a score of (0.6/0.7)*27+(2/15)*13

=23.14+1.75= 24.9

B. Would have a score of 19.3+4.33=23.63

C. Would have a score of 15.4+7= 22.4

 

A would get in.

 

But if we use the earlier formula which i think is wrong

 

A would have a 26.325+9.24=35.57

B would have a 25.65+10.11=35.76

C would have a 24.975+10.98=35.955

 

Here C would be benefiting because of the MCAT which is conflicting with their formula for a higher allocation to GPA. Also look at the difference in scores in the second calculation, they are just by a few decimal pointts. The difference in the lowest and the highest score would just be by 2 points by the formula used in the second calculation without the ECs. So the ECs could actually make the most difference. A person on the lower academic spectrum could get in with an EC score higher by 2 points from an above average applicant. This can't be correct whatsover.

 

I'm quite confident that friendly magpie's formula is accurate.

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THE AVERAGE OOP GPA accepted last cycle was 3.96. So Options B and C would have close to a 0 chance, and option A is only possible if the applicant had amazing ECs. To be realistic OOP needs 3.95+ AND 33+ and that is not an exaggeration (see stats from past cycle.)

For OOP applicants, average ECs/activities,

 

A. GPA 3.95 and MCAT 34

B. GPA 3.85 and MCAT 37

C. GPA 3.75 and MCAT 40

 

Any one have a chance for interview invitation?

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For OOP applicants, average ECs/activities,

 

A. GPA 3.95 and MCAT 34

B. GPA 3.85 and MCAT 37

C. GPA 3.75 and MCAT 40

 

Any one have a chance for interview invitation?

A would have a higher chance because MCAT is their strong point and 27% is for the MCAT as compared to C where the MCAT is the stronger part of their application.
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