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Keeping at it


Guest ryguy

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This is for everyone and anyone,

 

 

I am trying to get a feel for the success rates for 1st time applicants. In other words, how many out there have applied to med school more than one year? If so, what was something you changed in your application the next time around?

 

Hopefully we'll get some good info to use as fodder for those of us around here who will do this again next year. Cheers.

 

ryan

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Probably not the answer that you are looking for but...

 

I applied once - to UofT and UWO. I was accepted by both in the first round.

 

For me, 2 applications = 2 acceptances.

 

I know plenty of classmates that made two (or more) applications but it is not necessarily a given that your first application will be unsuccessful. It's not game over until you have a PFO in your hands!

 

Good luck and don't lose hope yet!

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Guest Ian Wong

In my med class, I think probably at least 40-50% of people applied more than once. It's definitely not uncommon to have to re-apply before getting in, and it isn't really a reflection of yourself, but rather the circumstances and the other applicants with whom you are competing.

 

One guy applied *four* times before getting accepted; he'll make an awesome doc.

 

Ian

UBC, Med 4

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Guest UOMeds05

similar experience here... many of my class-mates are repeat applicants... i would be willing to bet more than 50%. As Ian put, really has no reflection on the applicant, but more so on the process.

 

If you are a repeat applicant, use your first experience as a learning tool. Chances are there is nothing you need to change. You may just find yourself more confident in the interview, with the experience to havel an organized, thoughtful approach.

 

Perseverance is key. Hang in there, you will make it.

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Guest not rex morgan

I, too, got in after my third try...no PhD, though. One of your requests was to talk about what we did to improve our applications. I really want to encourage you, in the event that you don't get in, to look at it as time handed to you. You may consider grad school if you're interesed in exploring science a little bit more. You may chose to travel. You may chose international volunteering. Do some more classes, do some more volunteering, spend more time with a niece or nephew. Whatever you do, don't chose how you spend the next year based on what you think will get you into med school. There really is no equation. Go with whatever excites you. When you eventually do get into med, you will realize how little time you have left for quite a while to really do some cool stuff.

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Guest jmh2005

I finally got an interview invite and acceptance on my third application to McMaster (I only ever applied to Mac, however). I was lucky because I did have a good job that was related to medicine which allowed me to gain increased experience which looked good on my application and in my case, time (experience) helped me out. I volunteered to do research (I had very little of this on my 1st two apps) which I found very helpful to round out my background. I also went back to school part-time last year to study more biology and 1st year chem, because I was lacking these from both of my degrees (however, I already had anatomy, physiology, human biochem, biomechanics, exercise phys., and numerous health-related courses...), because I felt I would be a more dedicated, attractive applicant. This actually came up in the interview and they were quite surprised that I would give up half my salary to study basic sciences (that I should have taken 9 years ago!) and I truly believe it helped me get to where I am today...I was also going to write the MCAT this past August (which was also why I took the courses), but thankfully I didn't have to go through that song and dance...

 

The other thing I did was tell the people I work with my goals and actually had the resounding support of two physicans I worked with (whom both wrote me letters) which I think helped my application in the collation stage...

 

So, yes, there are things that can be done to add to your application, just take a long, hard critical look...also, I spent SO much time on my application, writing, re-writing, revisions, feedback from many people which was also key to getting the elusive interview at Mac.

 

Best of luck to all now and in the future!

 

J

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Some stats from Queen's first-year class, FYI:

 

Times applied:

60 first time

33 second time

7 third or more

 

Pre-med education:

71 Bachelor's

17 Master's

8 some undergrad

2 Doctorate

2 Tech college

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Guest jmh2005

Tantastic,

 

I made the switch to meds from being an Occupational Therapist. I practiced in just about every area possible in OT (other than Peds...) and just didn't find anything stimulating and challenging enough for me (I stress, for me...there are many who find OT very stimulating and challenging and by no means do I wish to belittle the profession...). However, I found myself desiring to do the things that I saw the med students, clerks and docs doing, so I knew I had to make the switch. I practiced for almost 3 years before starting Meds this year. For me it was about career satisfaction, a desire to do more and being given the opportunity to work to prevent illness, disease, etc...not just rehabilitate it. I wanted to learn more about the human body and mind and knew that I had the energy and drive to study medicine, so I went for it. There are many other previous health care professionals in my class and I think there are a few who shared similar feelings as myself and made that crazy leap...and I don't regret it one bit, it's fabulous!!

 

Hope that gives you a bit of insight, take care and best of luck,

J

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Guest tantastic

Thanks alot for your response :D

 

I was also wondering if you had done OT as a second undergrad degree or whether you completed the program as a Masters? What kinds of things do OT adcoms look for in a candidate?

 

Finally what kind of salary ranges can one expect in OT? Is owning your own OT business a viable and possibly lucrative option within the current health care system?

 

Thanks again for the advice, your help is truly appreciated. Sorry if these are dumb questions, I'm just trying to get a feel for the kinds of health care jobs that are out there in case I don't get accepted into medicine. Alot of these alternative careers actually sound quite interesting. Thanks again:)

 

Tara

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Guest Ian Wong

Heya,

 

Just wanted to mention this. If you want to start a discussion on something else unrelated to the original topic, please start a new thread on it. If you start a new message entitled: "Occupational Therapy as a Career?" or something like that, you're a lot more likely to get other people's attention who might either have the same question as you, or alternatively might have already started along that pathway and could give you good advice.

 

It will also make it a lot easier for anyone in the future who might have questions regarding occupational therapy to find out information on it. So, in summary, if you want to talk further on OT, please start a new message with an appropriate subject heading. :) Thanks, and thank you to jmh for your insight.

 

Ian

UBC, Med 4

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