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Curious about the LLB


Guest sally2001

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Guest sally2001

i think i read in someone's post (can't remember who) that they were applying to meds from a law background. since the LLB is an undergrad degree, can the grades earned during that degree be used to calculate ones OMSAS GPA? i'm just intrigued by that since its also a professional degree but not a graduate one.. (as opposed to the LLM)

thanks for any insight!

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Guest Kirsteen

Hi sally2001,

 

I hope you don't mind me butting in, but I read in an older thread, some of the posts from some LLB folks. It seemed that their LLB degree was not being considered as a graduate degree when it came to the meds application process. Conjecturing then, if it wasn't being deemed a graduate degree for those purposes, then it would be considered an undergrad degree and the courses should be factored in to the undergraduate GPA calculations?

 

Cheers,

Kirsteen

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Guest macdaddyeh

Hello Kirsteen:

 

I am speaking with reference to Mac specifically. I think somewhere it says on their website that LLB is considered an UNDERGRAD degree and NOT a graduate degree (like teaching, medicine, etc. which, despite their rigorous training, are still considered undergrad). Therefore all law degree courses WILL be counted toward an undergraduate GPA record. I imagine that this is a Canada-wide phenomenon to consider law as Undergrad and to include the marks in the application process. Sorry:rolleyes

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Guest statementofclaim

As any law student or graduate will tell you, law students are subject to "the curve." While you need good grades to get into law school, once there, the best and brightest at taking 100% finals usually grab the small percentage of A's available. When I look at my law school classmates that were among that select few with an A or B+ average, they could have basically done whatever they wanted to do from an academic perspective. If that includes becoming a doctor after law school, then they will have no problem. Those wanting to make that shift from Law to Medicine from the head of that curve would be a very very very small group (one every few years), in my view. Their opportunities are just too great to pack up and return for another 6-10 years of school and training, unless they suddenly decided that they really wanted to be a physician.

 

As for the rest of their classmates surfing the curve, I wonder how all the B's on their transcripts would "compute" into the med school application process? Not all that great I suspect. I know several classmates who were in this group and who went into law as a second choie to medicine.

 

That being said, nobody should give up on their dream. One of my wife's med school classmates tried to get into medical school three times. When he submitted his third application he also applied to law school. He was accepted early to law school and then later that year he was finally admitted. He's now finishing his Cardiothoracic Surgery Residency and getting ready for a year of cutting overseas for a fellowship.

 

Later...

 

Later...Mark

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