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Guest calvindog

Drive the little ferry in False creek :lol

 

only Vancouver people will get that one!

 

Seriously, I plan to continue onto graduate work in Mathematics at UBC. What I'll do then, only God knows.

 

This is, of course, after several attempts to gain admission. I am older than most applicants (33) so time is NOT on my side and have given myself two, maybe three attempts at Med school before I'll move on.

 

Cheers:hat

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Hi Calvin Dog:

 

You are a ATC as well, are you not? I'm curious what sort of training do you need to become an ATC? My cousin is a pilot but given the mass layoffs in the airline industry currently he is thinking about working as an ATC. He'll still have a chance to be near airports and planes, just not soaring above the clouds ;) Would you continue as an ATC if medschool doesn't pan out in the next few years or are you going to change gears totally out of that employment as well?

 

Are you completing your first undergrad degree (Math I guess?) while working full-time, or did you complete an undergrad degree and then commence work as an ATC?

 

In any case, best of luck to you! You seem like a really unique and interesting candidate!

 

Cheers Dude :hat

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Guest aneliz

My father is an ATC...they are not a very happy bunch...most work miserable shifts and they are very short staffed and highly stressed....especially since they are no longer employed by Transport Canada but are run by a company called NavCanada.

 

If you are interested in a career in ATC, the only way into it in Canada is through NavCanada's own training programs...

 

If you want details, they can be found at:

 

atsrecruitment.navcanada.ca/welcome.html

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Guest Kirsteen

Hi there calvindog,

 

I heard a lovely little anecdote the other day from an admissions officer, which involved a person who applied to the same medical school for six years in a row. Apparently on his sixth try the admissions office called him to let him know that he had been successful in gaining entry to medicine. ... and apparently his reaction was the most ecstatic and jubilant that the admissions office had ever heard.

 

Cheers,

Kirsteen

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Guest calvindog

Hi guys, thanks for the responses.

 

j282- I should stay in ATC as it is a good job with regards to pay and time off ($125K/year at 36hours/week) but as aneliz pointed out, we are a very unhappy bunch!

 

Not to go into too great of details, but the company I work for (Nav Canada) is deplorable!

 

A little bit of history for those interested....

 

I had every intention of being an airline pilot from as far back as I can remember. I obtained all the necessary Pilot licenses at age 19 and then went to univerisity (UVIC). It was then that I really changed as an individual as realized my passion for medicine.

 

Well, the amount of time and money invested in flying was too great to give up so I continued into a career in Aviation. After several layoffs I entered ATC to ride out the Aviation slump of the mid 90's. This gave me time to reflect and voila, here I am today, finishing my undergrad (will be done next year) and completly motivated to become a Doctor.

 

I am writing this not to pretend that my life history is worth a read but it just amazes me who much I/we change from our earliy 20's to 30's.

 

Now I'm at the point where I truely believe that life is too short (an overused proverb, I know :P ) to be in a job that does not make you happy or fulfill your days. I am tired if wishing I did something else and now I am just going to do it!

 

Anybody else think of themselves in this category?

 

Also, anybody think this life experience of mine would be an asset/disadvantage in the application process?

 

Cheers

 

Chris (btw...calvindog comes from my dog named "calvin")

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Guest calvindog

j282- just realized I did not answer some of your questions...

 

I am going to UBC fulltime as well as working fulltime :(

 

The training to become an Air traffic Controller is very intense and all info can be found at http://www.navacanada.ca.

 

Many Pilots who give up on flying enter ATC as an alternate route.

 

Sorry to all for letting this post digres from "medicine".

 

Cheers all

Chris:hat

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hey calvindog, that's so cool... I plan on practicing medicine for 15 years or so then I'll go for my pilot's license with the hopes of piloting a commercial jet one day (no joke!)

 

moo

UBC 2002

Northwestern Feinberg med 2006

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Guest mandm

Calvindog:

 

I think it's great that you are going to school and working at the same time. I am a mature student currently tussling going back to school in Sept while I continue working fulltime (part-time/ not working is not an option). It's really emotional and just last night I had ANOTHER midnight panic attack (does anyone else on the boards know about these?) w. the "i can't do it-it's too much" demons. (These guys and the

"do you want to be miserable for the rest of your life" demons are really having a field day w. me lately...)

 

That said, I have a few questions:

 

1) How many courses are you taking?

 

2) did you choose to do "easier" courses given your non-academic workload?

 

3) how have you managed to schedule yourself to still ensure you get good marks?

 

Thanks for the help. I am so glad you posted; your words really struck a chord with me. Good luck w. admissions-- I know you'll get in!

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Guest calvindog

Hey mandm,

 

I am amazed at the amount of people who are "older" applicants or have come from another profession-it is truly inspiring!

 

To answer your questions:

1) I take 5 courses at a time

 

This may seem absurd but with my work week (4 days a week) minus vacation days and "casual" days I actually work only 2.5 days per week an average. Also, at work, I am able to put in about 2 hours of studying/homework in an 8 hour shift. getting jealous yet? :b

 

2) I did not choose easier courses.

 

I am doing a Math degree with the intent of Graduate School if Medicine does not work out down the road so my courses are fairly intense. The one thing I did do is choose a math major for the absence of labs and I tend to be mathematically inclined anyways. I had originally started with a Biochem degree but the lab time was just too much.

 

3) Scheduling is just a matter of time management.

 

I don't mean to be corny but it is true. The greatest thing I have learned in the last fours years is time management. I am married and my wife is always amazed at how she barely notices that I am in school. She is an Air Traffic Controller also and I am usually at school when she is either working or doing her own things. (like shopping >: ) hehe

 

The demons you mentioned visit my house every night but then go away in the morning. They also come out whenever I am at the golf course or doing more "fun" things. Several times I come succumbed to these "demons" only to revert back to my studies shortly thereafter. I have learned to generally ignore them and take it day by day.

 

I think it is important for me and maybe may of you that going into Medicine is not the " be all and end all". It is just another path of life that we choose to take. A career in medicine is not going to make my life magical, it is just what I want to do.

 

If I can offer one more piece of advice......

When taking on such a heavy load in life remember to keep yourself balanced! Get 8 hours of sleep a night, exercise, watch some TV and go out whenever you can. It may seem we have no time for these luxuries but I find that by giving yourself these things, your energy and brain power is recharged for the next study session.

 

Did I say that I like to keep my posts short? Oh well,

 

Cheers

Chris:hat

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Guest mandm

It really helps to know that I am not the only one who goes completely cold in the middle of the night when I think of what I am about to get myself into. I especially like what you said about remembering that medicine is not the magic pill. I had forgotten that lately.

 

I might have more questions for you later.. but right now: simply thanks alot! :)

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Guest misagh

Hello mandm,

 

While I haven't gone completely cold in the middle of the night, I too have recently (since getting interview invites) been thinking more and more about what medicine really means and what I'm getting myself into. It's a sort of "fear", but in the sense that I don't know if I will have what it takes, or if I'll be able to find a balance in my life. Perhaps this isn't the best time to be having this sort of "fear", but we sometimes work in mysterious ways. And I suppose it's better late than never...

 

Of course, it's all a matter of fighting with my self-esteem and realizing that when called upon to do some service in the world, we as humans invariably find ways to adapt and bring ourselves to do the best we can. Sometimes we even surprise ourselves! And, if we're mindful and keep moderation in mind, we're sometimes able to find balance in everything we do.

 

Peace...

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Guest mandm

Hi there, misagh:

 

This is becoming a highly esoteric thread! :) Seriously though, it's an important discussion and it was good to hear your thoughts.

The biggest thing about entry into med school, IMO, is trying to reconcile the "I HAVE to do this, because in my soul I know it's what I want to do" with the REALLY subjective, often arbitary admissions process. One of my biggest tortures come from the idea of never being able to do what I want, and having to live the rest of my life with a sense of incompletion wrt my career (which of course impacts other aspects of life...).

 

There are several people I have met whose love was (and I suspect still is) medicine but never got in and as such " had their plans changed for them". I realise there are no guarentees in life but to work for something that you may NEVER achieve is really, really hard to reconcile...

 

(Yeah, I know, break out the Ativan... :)

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