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Double cohort


Guest Matty J K

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Guest Matty J K

Glad I'm through the process.

 

Imagine the competition to get into any professional faculty or other upper program.

 

I think we'll be seeing some high grades and MCAT's:x getting in if they don't bump up enrollment number... or at least while the bubble goes through.

 

agree / disagree ?

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The double cohort has squeezed more people into University but the question is how many will make it through their programs let alone, how many will be competitive for professional faculties. I think the failure rates etc. over the next few years will be a true test as to the secondary school system in preparing the double cohort for University.

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Guest peachy

The double cohort has pushed university numbers up pretty quickly, that's true. But none of the recent enrollment projections I've seen treat it as a bubble effect - for various demographic reasons, they're not expecting enrollment to ever drop below the double cohort levels again, it seems... so I think they're going to have to increase spaces in medical schools to cope with it at some point.

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Guest aneliz

I agree that the competition may increase (this year had the highest number of applicants in awhile)...but I don't think that this is as much of a certainty as people may think.

 

However, I don't think that you will see the number of medical school (or other professional school) seats increased to cope with the 'double cohort' or any other increase in demand from students for the programs.

 

The number of seats in these programs is controlled somewhat differently than the number of seats in programs like biology or engineering or history are....

 

In most undergrad programs, the enrollment (# of seats) is controlled at the bottom end...as demand increases, number of seats tend to increase....why? because assuming that they have the resources to teach the people that they let in, they really don't care how many people they put out (graduate) from those degree programs every year...

 

In contrast, professional program enrollment tends to be limited from the top down...they want to graduate X number of new doctors/dentists/chiropractors in any given year...and given the much greater demands on resources to educate these people and the very narrow career path when they are done, the number of seats in the programs are quite tightly controlled - regardless of whether there are 10 or 10 000 people that want into the program... I really don't think that you will see professional school seats increase solely to deal with the 'double cohort' or increased demand.

 

Those that graduate with a BSc in biology can go hundreds of different directions in terms of career...they can go into teaching, medicine, dentistry, research, government, etc, etc,etc...meanwhile those that come out of a professional program are quite specialised and are in direct competition with each other for a limited number of residency positions and/or jobs...so, it could be argued that opening up the number of places in medical school to accomodate the 'demand' would not ultimately best serve the students, as it will limit their ability to generate income when they are finished school. (Now before anybody jumps on me, I do realise that there is a shortage of docs right now, and we could really use more...but there has to be a corresponding increase in the number of residency spots - which so far hasn't happened - to make any increase in med school seats effective in decreasing the shortage of doctors) This type of situation happened with teacher's colleges in the mid-80's...the schools let in and trained far more people than there were teaching positions available (people needed)...and consequently, there were many years where a large proportion of the graduating class was unable to find a job as a teacher (due to the surplus of people looking)...and many of these people STILL have never worked as a teacher...they are doing hundreds of other jobs...so educating them to teach was a real waste of time and $$ when there were no jobs for them at the end....

 

My major point is that the number of seats in any professional program should be driven by the current need for that profession. It should not be driven by the demand by students to be in the program.

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Guest UWOMED2005

Don't forget, of the people in the High school graduating class of 2003 who will end up in meds, some will take 3 years. . . . some 4 years. . . some do a Master's. . . some a PhD. . . some take a year or two off. In actual effect, the double cohort should be spread out even more when applying to professional schools than it was when applying for undergrad schools.

 

Besides, the way things are going with increasing tuition, maybe by the time you guys apply people will have done the math on tuition vs. salary and NOBODY will want to apply to professional school. ;) I know, bad joke. . .

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