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I've seen people put:

 

Abc McDef, BSc

M.D candidate (20xx)

School

 

The kind of thing you might use when reaching out to a faculty member for a research project for the first time, etc, but not among your friends and family. I don't think its necessary after the first time.

 

Yeah, basically this. But only for formal emails. Most of the time, I just sign my name without credentials.

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If I am not sending my CV, then it is not necessary for anybody to know. Heck, my neighbours don't know I have a M.D. and it is not relevant.

 

I'd argue that sometimes it is relevant, depending on the purpose of the email. Especially if the person you're emailing doesn't know you/you've never communicated with them before.

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I've had students in the past with email signatures that say "BSc candidate". While writing "MD Candidate" is marginally less embarrassing, I think it is still kind of ridiculous. If you really are emailing about something formal, you should include your current credentials e.g. BSc, and maybe some contact info as well. Otherwise you probably would be stating in the body of the email who you are, wouldn't you?
 

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I have it on my signature, but only on initial emails. Any responses or non-professional emails i just sign my name or my initials.

 

This will sound a bit insensitive, but I don't think you have started Day 1 of med school yet?  I know you are super excited, but there is merit for modesty in medicine.  A very big no no I have recently learned is not to referring yourself as Dr. so and so while communicating with colleagues, especially as a resident.  While this is not the same, I would not recommend the full "MD class of" signature in every single email.  I agree with having it for a research email or shadowing email is helpful, but otherwise I'd just leave it at a first name.

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This will sound a bit insensitive, but I don't think you have started Day 1 of med school yet?  I know you are super excited, but there is merit for modesty in medicine.  A very big no no I have recently learned is not to referring yourself as Dr. so and so while communicating with colleagues, especially as a resident.  While this is not the same, I would not recommend the full "MD class of" signature in every single email.  I agree with having it for a research email or shadowing email is helpful, but otherwise I'd just leave it at a first name.

 

Yeah, its more comfortable to call someone by their first name. Unless its an attending physician, I generally call people (even fellows) by their first names and no one minds. Its much more personal in my opinion.

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This will sound a bit insensitive, but I don't think you have started Day 1 of med school yet?  I know you are super excited, but there is merit for modesty in medicine.  A very big no no I have recently learned is not to referring yourself as Dr. so and so while communicating with colleagues, especially as a resident.  While this is not the same, I would not recommend the full "MD class of" signature in every single email.  I agree with having it for a research email or shadowing email is helpful, but otherwise I'd just leave it at a first name.

 

Not that your post was insensitive but it was based on several assumptions you made about me without having much information. I do not have MD Class of XXXX in my signature, n'or do I Have Dr anywhere in my title. It reads as follows:

 

First Last, MSc

MD Student

University of Toronto

email

phone

 

Same as when I was completing my Masters I had:

 

First Last, BSc

MSc Student

University of Toronto

email

phone

 

I don't think that signature is void of modesty, nor do I think it oversteps my qualifications. I think it is professional when emailing someone for the first time (not responding to email) whom you have had no previous contact with, and obviously I would not refer to myself as Dr. to anyone, friends or colleagues. 

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