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Moving To Halifax For In-Province Status


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I'm a second degree student who applied this year to Queens and Western (GPA in the last two yrs: 3.94, all years from first degree are <3.5, MCAT 128/128/128/130). I'm in my last year and hoping to finish strong to apply to UOttawa next year. I probably didn't meet the MCAT cut-off for Western, not holding my breath for Queens because who knows what they are looking for.

 

If I am unsuccessful this cycle, I am prepared to rewrite the MCAT to meet Western's cut-offs. In the mean time, I may have an opportunity to move to Halifax next year to complete my training as an allied health professional. From what I understand on the school website, I will need to live in the region for 2 yrs prior to the start of medical school. So, if I move there in August 2016, complete my training in August 2017 and apply to Dal in August 2017 with the intention of living there until August 2018, I will be considered an in-province applicant?

 

I'd appreciate your input. Thanks a lot.

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I'm a second degree student who applied this year to Queens and Western (GPA in the last two yrs: 3.94, all years from first degree are <3.5, MCAT 128/128/128/130). I'm in my last year and hoping to finish strong to apply to UOttawa next year. I probably didn't meet the MCAT cut-off for Western, not holding my breath for Queens because who knows what they are looking for.

 

If I am unsuccessful this cycle, I am prepared to rewrite the MCAT to meet Western's cut-offs. In the mean time, I may have an opportunity to move to Halifax next year to complete my training as an allied health professional. From what I understand on the school website, I will need to live in the region for 2 yrs prior to the start of medical school. So, if I move there in August 2016, complete my training in August 2017 and apply to Dal in August 2017 with the intention of living there until August 2018, I will be considered an in-province applicant?

 

I'd appreciate your input. Thanks a lot.

This only flaw with this plan is that you (from what I interpreted) will still be in school until you apply. You need to live in the maritimes for 2 years while NOT in school to become IP. i.e. even doing a 4 year undergrad in NS will not make you an NS resident

 

You are an independent student (see definition below) and have resided continuously in the Maritime provinces for two periods of twelve consecutive months immediately prior to the start of the medical program (Aug 15 for the purposes of determining residency). This excludes time spent as a full-time student at a post-secondary institution 

 

So it means you would need to live in NS, working, from Aug 2017- Aug 2019, before applying for the 2020 Sept

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I will actually graduate this summer (2016). If I move there I will be doing an unpaid internship from 2016-2017, which I will have to do anyway to obtain my professional designation, even if I stay in Ontario. Does that work? :)

Maybe? I only know what you know, which is the quote from their site. I'd ask them before you move

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So I've thought about this a little more. I will have to decide in the next little while whether I'd like to pursue this.

I don't know anyone in the province and I've never been to NS. Can anyone give me a synopsis of what it's like to live there? From what I read on the internet cost of living is high, job market is not good, and the weather is dark and grey a lot...if I actually move there I will do a year of internship and then stay for a year to work as a registered dietitian, does anyone know what the job market is like for dietitians/health care professionals in general? I did a quick search on the internet and not many jobs came up.  I actually know of a couple of dietitians practicing in Ontario who went to school in NS so I'm getting the impression that there are not a whole lot of opportunities there...

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So I've thought about this a little more. I will have to decide in the next little while whether I'd like to pursue this.

I don't know anyone in the province and I've never been to NS. Can anyone give me a synopsis of what it's like to live there? From what I read on the internet cost of living is high, job market is not good, and the weather is dark and grey a lot...if I actually move there I will do a year of internship and then stay for a year to work as a registered dietitian, does anyone know what the job market is like for dietitians/health care professionals in general? I did a quick search on the internet and not many jobs came up.  I actually know of a couple of dietitians practicing in Ontario who went to school in NS so I'm getting the impression that there are not a whole lot of opportunities there...

That's basically accurate. The province it pretty much broke. Cost of living can be cheap though, I found it was a lot cheaper than ON, but I'm in Toronto so that's probably why

Out of curiosity, why NS? Alberta has a much better job market, plus 2 med schools to apply to. Or, moving to NB would give you IP status for both MUN and Dal  would it not?

 

Practical considerations aside, Maritimers are probably the nicest, most laid-back people you will ever meet and lots of fun

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you should move to Calgary or BC. For DAL their points are mainly for your GPA and MCAT is just 10%. You need to have atleast 3.8 GPA even as IP to have a decent shot. 

 

Good luck!

Hi, I was under the impression that for IP they would look at my last two years (which are 3.90+)...although I can't find this on their website now. And as long as I meet the cut-offs I would granted an interview, after which the essay and interview would determine whether I will be accepted.

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Hi, I was under the impression that for IP they would look at my last two years (which are 3.90+)...although I can't find this on their website now. And as long as I meet the cut-offs I would granted an interview, after which the essay and interview would determine whether I will be accepted.

Look up their formula on the website-it's mostly interview (40%) and supplemental (35%)

 

the supplemental is almost entirely scored based on ECs, so the equivalent of the OMSAS sketch. They really emphasize ECs and medically related experience

 

The downside to interviewing every IP who meets the cutoffs is that Dal interview a lot more students per seat then say, Toronto

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Look up their formula on the website-it's mostly interview (40%) and supplemental (35%)

 

the supplemental is almost entirely scored based on ECs, so the equivalent of the OMSAS sketch. They really emphasize ECs and medically related experience

 

The downside to interviewing every IP who meets the cutoffs is that Dal interview a lot more students per seat then say, Toronto

Yeah I did look, which is why I said what I said.

 

Like I said I will be completing my training as an allied health care professional (i.e. gaining a year of clinical experience) if I go, so that's what I'll be bringing to the table (plus a couple of other healthcare-related work experiences). According to a spreadsheet Birdy put out, Dal had 450 applicants for ~100 Atlantic seats, which is not any worse than Queen's post-interview odds. this is 2012 information, so things could've changed, of course.

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Yeah I did look, which is why I said what I said.

 

Like I said I will be completing my training as an allied health care professional (i.e. gaining a year of clinical experience) if I go, so that's what I'll be bringing to the table (plus a couple of other healthcare-related work experiences). According to a spreadsheet Birdy put out, Dal had 450 applicants for ~100 Atlantic seats, which is not any worse than Queen's post-interview odds. this is 2012 information, so things could've changed, of course.

 

 

If you move to Halifax, there are less than 100 seats available; check out my class statistics (http://medicine.dal.ca/departments/core-units/admissions/about/class-profile.html):

 

 

How many applicants?
  • Total applications received: 1183
  • Maritime: 479 
  • Non-Maritime: 686
  • IMG/Saudi: 18
Breakdown for the Class of 2019
  • Total class: 110
  • Nova Scotia: 63
  • New Brunswick: 30
  • Prince Edward Island: 6
  • Saudi (government sponsored program): 1
  • Non-Maritime: 9
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If you move to Halifax, there are less than 100 seats available; check out my class statistics (http://medicine.dal.ca/departments/core-units/admissions/about/class-profile.html):

 

 

How many applicants?
  • Total applications received: 1183
  • Maritime: 479 
  • Non-Maritime: 686
  • IMG/Saudi: 18
Breakdown for the Class of 2019
  • Total class: 110
  • Nova Scotia: 63
  • New Brunswick: 30
  • Prince Edward Island: 6
  • Saudi (government sponsored program): 1
  • Non-Maritime: 9

 

Hey! thanks for the info! Any idea how many applicants from NS? I wonder if the radio would still be around 5:1 for applicants vs. seats.

and wow, a 60 yr old in the class!

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