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In Need Of Some Real Closure And Words Of Advice


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Hello everyone. I am an applicant for the Physiotherapy programs this cycle.

This year marks my third year applying, which of course, signifies that I have failed the previous two times of applying.

I'm sure many are on the same boat as me on this forum. Every year that I apply, it is a great balance between optimism and panic. 

PT is all I have ever wanted to do since my mid-teenage years (I am now 24, going on 25) and I cannot mask this depression that conquers over as I received those rejection letters two years in a row.  I am only getting older and I feel like the time is running out (silly I know).

The PT program is competitive - that is no secret.  I just wanted to seek some words of encouragement from my fellow applicants, current PT students, as well as graduates.   I am beginning to ask myself if this path is truly for me and meant for me.  My GPA is 3.84 and that was the GPA I have applied with for the previous years. From my friends who have made it in to the PT programs tell me stories of how the difficult parts through undergrad seem like a joke, due to the toughness to even survive in the programs (many assume the two years will be a breeze) and I can't lie, it sounds intimidating. 

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Hello everyone. I am an applicant for the Physiotherapy programs this cycle.

This year marks my third year applying, which of course, signifies that I have failed the previous two times of applying.

I'm sure many are on the same boat as me on this forum. Every year that I apply, it is a great balance between optimism and panic. 

PT is all I have ever wanted to do since my mid-teenage years (I am now 24, going on 25) and I cannot mask this depression that conquers over as I received those rejection letters two years in a row.  I am only getting older and I feel like the time is running out (silly I know).

The PT program is competitive - that is no secret.  I just wanted to seek some words of encouragement from my fellow applicants, current PT students, as well as graduates.   I am beginning to ask myself if this path is truly for me and meant for me.  My GPA is 3.84 and that was the GPA I have applied with for the previous years. From my friends who have made it in to the PT programs tell me stories of how the difficult parts through undergrad seem like a joke, due to the toughness to even survive in the programs (many assume the two years will be a breeze) and I can't lie, it sounds intimidating. 

 

If this scares you even more than giving up your life dream, then by all means give up. 

 

If you are more scared of not reaching your ambitions, give it everything you got. 

 

- G

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Is your GPA out of 4?  If so, that's really good!!  I'm sure you've been getting interview invites at least?  Just practice, practice, practice.  I'm confident that you'll crack the code eventually, so don't give up!  Btw, 24 or 25 is not old at all.

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Is your GPA out of 4?  If so, that's really good!!  I'm sure you've been getting interview invites at least?  Just practice, practice, practice.  I'm confident that you'll crack the code eventually, so don't give up!  Btw, 24 or 25 is not old at all.

I have been going to the UT and Mac interviews for the past two cycles.... this depression is real and I always wonder if I am the only one  :( but thank you all.

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I am just curious how is your resume and and past experience? 

 

I've been working as a CEP at Toronto Rehab for 3 years now, a RA under a professor at UofT for 4 years (stopped last year), 750 hours of volunteering hours collected since 2009.  I have seen many with less experiences (even no experiences) who have been accepted into the schools in Ontario, and I have also seen plenty with much more impressive experiences but never got in.  I know how ridiculous this sounds but I'm more stressed about this delay in terms of my stage in life and my age.. I'm more than committed to sticking to my plans and achieving my goal of being a PT but thinking how I would graduate at 27 or 28 makes me feeling really blue... weird and very personal but that's where my head's at :(

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Let me give you some context: I'm 25 years old and just now finishing up undergrad in a completely unrelated field (Commerce) who didn't even realize this was what they wanted to do until 18 months ago. I've taken 6 courses per semester for the last three in order to knock off as many as I could before grad, and even then I can still only apply to McMaster for this year. If I don't get in, I'm taking another three courses this fall in order to apply to the full cycle for next year.

 

This is all to say that you're not alone in being scared about the prospect of things not working out the way you hope they will. If it truly is what you want to do, you'll find a way to make it happen if you stay positive and go through the motions.

 

Have you considered applying overseas or is that not an option? It seems to me like with your GPA and clinic experience you'd be a strong candidate and, regardless of whether or not you feel it's fair, those schools make a lot of money off international students who maybe aren't getting what they need back home.

 

 I'm more than committed to sticking to my plans and achieving my goal of being a PT but thinking how I would graduate at 27 or 28 makes me feeling really blue... weird and very personal but that's where my head's at :(

 

What makes you feel more blue: getting stuck working in a career you have no way out of for the next 40 years, or maybe being 4-5 years older than your peers but doing what you love?

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If being a PT is all that you've ever wanted to become, then don't ever give up! I'm also turning 25 this year and it's my second time applying to OT. It took me a lot of time to decide what I wanted to do as well as to fix my grades to do so, after undergrad, and I know.. it sucks to be at this stage where you know your peers are already working good jobs or got into other/finished grad programs. But there's also no point in comparing your age and success with your peers. You're living your life and all that matters is that you achieve your own goals and dreams. Hang in there! Maybe start/continue working to gain more experiences and pass the time, but I don't think that you should give up on applying. I agree with Wiltoe - applying internationally is also another option if finances aren't the biggest issue. An instructor who I had for an Athletic Therapy course (who was also a PT) had a colleague that applied 8 times to PT before she got in. Nothing is impossible. :)

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If being a PT is all that you've ever wanted to become, then don't ever give up! I'm also turning 25 this year and it's my second time applying to OT. It took me a lot of time to decide what I wanted to do as well as to fix my grades to do so, after undergrad, and I know.. it sucks to be at this stage where you know your peers are already working good jobs or got into other/finished grad programs. But there's also no point in comparing your age and success with your peers. You're living your life and all that matters is that you achieve your own goals and dreams. Hang in there! Maybe start/continue working to gain more experiences and pass the time, but I don't think that you should give up on applying. I agree with Wiltoe - applying internationally is also another option if finances aren't the biggest issue. An instructor who I had for an Athletic Therapy course (who was also a PT) had a colleague that applied 8 times to PT before she got in. Nothing is impossible. :)

wow. 8 times? that is some perseverance even I cannot say I have.

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Hello everyone. I am an applicant for the Physiotherapy programs this cycle.

This year marks my third year applying, which of course, signifies that I have failed the previous two times of applying.

I'm sure many are on the same boat as me on this forum. Every year that I apply, it is a great balance between optimism and panic. 

PT is all I have ever wanted to do since my mid-teenage years (I am now 24, going on 25) and I cannot mask this depression that conquers over as I received those rejection letters two years in a row.  I am only getting older and I feel like the time is running out (silly I know).

The PT program is competitive - that is no secret.  I just wanted to seek some words of encouragement from my fellow applicants, current PT students, as well as graduates.   I am beginning to ask myself if this path is truly for me and meant for me.  My GPA is 3.84 and that was the GPA I have applied with for the previous years. From my friends who have made it in to the PT programs tell me stories of how the difficult parts through undergrad seem like a joke, due to the toughness to even survive in the programs (many assume the two years will be a breeze) and I can't lie, it sounds intimidating. 

 

I've been working as a CEP at Toronto Rehab for 3 years now, a RA under a professor at UofT for 4 years (stopped last year), 750 hours of volunteering hours collected since 2009.  I have seen many with less experiences (even no experiences) who have been accepted into the schools in Ontario, and I have also seen plenty with much more impressive experiences but never got in.  I know how ridiculous this sounds but I'm more stressed about this delay in terms of my stage in life and my age.. I'm more than committed to sticking to my plans and achieving my goal of being a PT but thinking how I would graduate at 27 or 28 makes me feeling really blue... weird and very personal but that's where my head's at :(

Your grades are good and I believe with all your experience, you are bound to get in this year. :) . If not apply to schools outside of Ontario. There are more than 4 PT schools in the country you know. You will get in somewhere. Your grades are high enough as an OOP in other provinces. If I get in this year(and that is an if lol,) I will be graduating no earlier than my 28th birthday but I am staying positive cos I know I will love being a Therapist. Most of my friends are already working but I believe I will have job satisfaction by pursuing my dreams. PT and OT are professions people switch to and we are lucky to be pursuing it. At least we figured it out sooner. I am yet to meet an unhappy PT or OT. They all say they love their jobs even if it is stressful. That goes to show what an incredible field this is. Hang in there my friend. You are not alone. Oh btw. I graduated high school at 16 and I just finished my undergrad last yr :P . Your situation is definitely not as bad as you think. Just look at the bright side. 

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I have been going to the UT and Mac interviews for the past two cycles.... this depression is real and I always wonder if I am the only one  :( but thank you all.

If you are getting interviews, then you are capable of the program and the schools are agreeing on this. Now you just need to bring all the passion you have gained  from your experiences to those interviews! 

I'm not applying PT, I'm doing med, but I saw this and it just seemed so similar to what everyone seems to go through with that as well. 

Honestly, see if you can contact a career adviser at your school  (if your currently taking courses) or see if they have services for alumni. I prepped for MMIs with one, and they were awesome. 

Also, for general healthcare related interview prep, have you considered joining some skype interview prep groups on the premed threads here? Did this as well, I found it super helpful to get 100% objective feedback. And I am sure no one would care one iota that you're going PT not med! 

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Hey there,

 

Don't let past 'failure' and fear of getting older hold you back. I got in last year (after one failed attempt) and I am 39 years old. I wanted to be a PT when I was 23, but back then, with my undergrad in Business just completed, I would have had to do my high school science, then a qualifying year of Science prerequisites and then 3 (or 4?) years for the PT degree. It just didn't seem possible. But it became possible, and though I'm older, it doesn't matter at, I still did it. There isn't a magical 'in group' that you can't belong to. You are almost there, and you can do it!

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Hey there,

 

Don't let past 'failure' and fear of getting older hold you back. I got in last year (after one failed attempt) and I am 39 years old. I wanted to be a PT when I was 23, but back then, with my undergrad in Business just completed, I would have had to do my high school science, then a qualifying year of Science prerequisites and then 3 (or 4?) years for the PT degree. It just didn't seem possible. But it became possible, and though I'm older, it doesn't matter at, I still did it. There isn't a magical 'in group' that you can't belong to. You are almost there, and you can do it!

 

Good for you man! As someone who's just graduating with a BComm right now but decided to make the jump last year (with no science background to speak of), that's pretty inspiring to read. Do you mind sharing more details of how you pulled that off? Did you go back and take all the pre-requisite science courses on your own time? What program did you end up getting in to? Do you think your experience in business will help you or you'll ever use it to run your own practice? Sorry for all the questions there's not many of us around. :)

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I've been working as a CEP at Toronto Rehab for 3 years now, a RA under a professor at UofT for 4 years (stopped last year), 750 hours of volunteering hours collected since 2009.  I have seen many with less experiences (even no experiences) who have been accepted into the schools in Ontario, and I have also seen plenty with much more impressive experiences but never got in.  I know how ridiculous this sounds but I'm more stressed about this delay in terms of my stage in life and my age.. I'm more than committed to sticking to my plans and achieving my goal of being a PT but thinking how I would graduate at 27 or 28 makes me feeling really blue... weird and very personal but that's where my head's at :(

You have a good GPA, impressive experience and you seem to be very committed. Could it come down to your essays?  In terms of your age, DON'T WORRY ABOUT IT! I am 25 and this is my first year applying. I'm getting married in 2 months and don't even have a career started yet. People get "the rest of their lives" started at different ages but what matters is that you follow your dreams and push to get where you want to be! I wish you all the best and hope you get in this year! Please keep us all posted and PM me if you need someone to talk to :)

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You have a good GPA, impressive experience and you seem to be very committed. Could it come down to your essays?  In terms of your age, DON'T WORRY ABOUT IT! I am 25 and this is my first year applying. I'm getting married in 2 months and don't even have a career started yet. People get "the rest of their lives" started at different ages but what matters is that you follow your dreams and push to get where you want to be! I wish you all the best and hope you get in this year! Please keep us all posted and PM me if you need someone to talk to :)

 

All good advice! You're in the right place, OP. If you need any more confirmation go browse the 'non-traditional' applicants forum (most are medicine related, but relevant all the same). I spent some time on there last night and gained alot more perspective on my own situation. Some of the stories of people leaving behind 80k+ salaries and cozy jobs are truly incredible.

 

The fact of the matter is you've got everything on 'the list' you needed to check off: a GPA that keeps you competitive with all available options, tons of volunteer hours, relevant work experience and perhaps most of all you've got a good idea of what to expect from the process. You just need to put it all together and be confident in the abilities you obviously possess when you're back in the room with the people making decisions. We aren't "old" or at an advanced "life stage" by any means, and even if we are doesn't that mean we've just gained more experience to reflect on why we're making the right decision? Time can be used as an advantage if you've taken the opportunity to understand how it helped you get where you are.

 

I am a little curious why you're limiting the scope of your applications to UofT and McMaster? Why don't you apply to any schools outside Ontario or even internationally?

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All good advice! You're in the right place, OP. If you need any more confirmation go browse the 'non-traditional' applicants forum (most are medicine related, but relevant all the same). I spent some time on there last night and gained alot more perspective on my own situation. Some of the stories of people leaving behind 80k+ salaries and cozy jobs are truly incredible.

 

The fact of the matter is you've got everything on 'the list' you needed to check off: a GPA that keeps you competitive with all available options, tons of volunteer hours, relevant work experience and perhaps most of all you've got a good idea of what to expect from the process. You just need to put it all together and be confident in the abilities you obviously possess when you're back in the room with the people making decisions. We aren't "old" or at an advanced "life stage" by any means, and even if we are doesn't that mean we've just gained more experience to reflect on why we're making the right decision? Time can be used as an advantage if you've taken the opportunity to understand how it helped you get where you are.

 

I am a little curious why you're limiting the scope of your applications to UofT and McMaster? Why don't you apply to any schools outside Ontario or even internationally?

 

Thank you very much everyone for your replies :)

 

Also, I have been keeping it limited to the Ontario schools, because (in all honesty) financial burden is another thing I have to worry about.  Going international seem to multiply the debt.   I know it's another funny thing for me to say, as getting a career is obviously more important and comes first before worrying about debt (also I have not even been admitted to any schools in Ontario the past two years so I should be considering it) but that's where my stress comes in..   I always weigh the pros and cons each year between Ontario schools and international schools but I end up applying to Ontario schools with that optimism and high hopes to just get in....   I do a TON of research, talking to PT veterans, new grads and etc.   It's not always about the money, but I do ask about it, because in the end it is a career and we make our living through it.    PT is simply not in the same league as medicine/dentistry/pharmacy and from what I've been gathering is that, PT grads really struggle to pay off their debts.  Having $100,000+ of debt returning to Canada gets me worried.  So spending time thinking about all this had me crashing a little and resorted to this forum... I appreciate everyone's input and please keep them coming.  Please tell me more of what you know.  You all are the best.

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Thank you very much everyone for your replies :)

 

Also, I have been keeping it limited to the Ontario schools, because (in all honesty) financial burden is another thing I have to worry about.  Going international seem to multiply the debt.   I know it's another funny thing for me to say, as getting a career is obviously more important and comes first before worrying about debt (also I have not even been admitted to any schools in Ontario the past two years so I should be considering it) but that's where my stress comes in..   I always weigh the pros and cons each year between Ontario schools and international schools but I end up applying to Ontario schools with that optimism and high hopes to just get in....   I do a TON of research, talking to PT veterans, new grads and etc.   It's not always about the money, but I do ask about it, because in the end it is a career and we make our living through it.    PT is simply not in the same league as medicine/dentistry/pharmacy and from what I've been gathering is that, PT grads really struggle to pay off their debts.  Having $100,000+ of debt returning to Canada gets me worried.  So spending time thinking about all this had me crashing a little and resorted to this forum... I appreciate everyone's input and please keep them coming.  Please tell me more of what you know.  You all are the best.

 

Understandable. I don't mean to be flippant about the international thing, obviously it's a big investment of both time and money... I'm lucky to have family who are able to help me over that hurdle if it means I can get the degree and get working sooner than I might otherwise have. What I did notice as I started taking those applications seriously is there seems to be a significant amount of financial assistance available to people who take that route (depending on the school); QMU in Edinburgh usually admits 9-10 international students and half of them end up with scholarships that basically cut tuition in half over the course of the two years. Obviously still a decent chunk of money involved, but the help is there nonetheless and that's not to mention the vast pool of scholarship funds available through Canadian sources. 

 

Re: the Canadian schools, you've clearly worked hard to put yourself in a position to succeed so why not give yourself the best chance possible! All you need is an offer, you can make the hard decisions from there right? :) I'm rooting for ya.

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Good for you man! As someone who's just graduating with a BComm right now but decided to make the jump last year (with no science background to speak of), that's pretty inspiring to read. Do you mind sharing more details of how you pulled that off? Did you go back and take all the pre-requisite science courses on your own time? What program did you end up getting in to? Do you think your experience in business will help you or you'll ever use it to run your own practice? Sorry for all the questions there's not many of us around. :)

I took the pre-reqs while I was having and taking care of my kids:) Some by distance and some at UBC (the program I got into). I had to do the volunteer hours and beg my profs for letters of recommendations (because they weren't full time profs - so there was no obligation). It seemed like there were too many hoops to jump through. Because of my undergrad, I never really new for sure if I'd be good at Science courses - so that was a little intimidating - and really the first obstacle (self-doubt) that I had to overcome; but really it's about wanting something enough, having the drive to make it happen - in my opinion. Do I think my degree will help me run my own practice? I don't know. I think that it's important to not be naive in business - be objective about your labour costs, your overhead, your partnerships etc. - so sure, your background can help. I've always found the concept of marrying business and therapy a difficult one - but I've personally seen how my Family Doctor runs a pretty efficient and likely lucrative practice, and how that greatly benefits his patient care, (he is a happy dude with a ton of vacation time) - so I think business acumen can be good for everyone; especially to the extent that it helps you care for yourself. No worries about the questions! I used to troll this site when I was dying to get in, so it feels good to give back. Best of luck!

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