Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Refused Post-Interview... Applying Again


Recommended Posts

Hi everyone!

 

I applied to McGill this year and was refused post-interview. It's my first time applying. My mom, seeing how devastated I was, started looking for other jobs I could get with my biomed degree. She has a lot of faith in me and believes in me of course, but is just doing this to calm my nerves. I have heard countless stories of people getting in after 2, 3, or more attempts and I heard of, as well as met, many people that it wasn't their first time being interviewed. I would really like to get some more stats to get my thoughts straight and also to explain to my mom.

 

So please provide any info you have...

 

1) Those who reapplied and got another interview, was your CV and GPA basically the same?

 

2) give any insight on your personal story or story of someone you knew who got rejected post-interview.

 

P.s. I had a meeting with the admissions office... I understand and realize now why I was rejected (can PM me if interested!), so I'm still hopeful for next year.

 

P.s.s. Congrats to all those accepted this year very proud of you all! Lots of love :wub:

 

 

(PM me preferably, or reply here)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Having received an interview, you are qualified! Qualified candidates are rejected all the time, it is routine. It is a numbers game, luck is also involved and the norm is for applicants to apply an average of 3X before achieving success; some get in on the first attempt, and others apply more than 3 times, members of this forum have succeeded after 7 or 8 application cycles.

 

The key is persistence. Those who are persistent by applying year after year get in.

 

If your CV and Narratives were great, than you need to examine your performance at the MMI.

 

Do something you enjoy and find useful and reapply next year. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Having received an interview, you are qualified! Qualified candidates are rejected all the time, it is routine. It is a numbers game, luck is also involved and the norm is for applicants to apply an average of 3X before achieving success; some get in on the first attempt, and others apply more than 3 times, members of this forum have succeeded after 7 or 8 application cycles.

 

The key is persistence. Those who are persistent by applying year after year get in.

 

If your CV and Narratives were great, than you need to examine your performance at the MMI.

 

Do something you enjoy and find useful and reapply next year. 

+1.

 

Vicodin, your post made me smile, because I could not only tell how much you want it, but you seem to have lots of perspective as well. All my best to you. Hope it works out (the way I see it: if it doesn't work out, it's because it's not the end).

Link to post
Share on other sites

I know someone who just got in this year: this was his third time applying, with 1 previous MMI.

 

I agree with the previous post regarding interviews: the more experience you have with them, the more you can improve.

 

I suggest you keep trying! If medicine is what you really want to do, don't give up yet!

Also, I would always suggest to apply to as many universities as possible, even the francophone ones. The more broad your application, the more chances/interviews to practice!

 

Good luck!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I got in this year and it's my second time interviewing. I was in the exact same boat you were last year and trust me when I say I know how it feels. Take some time to collect yourself, and I would definitely reapply next year. In the year between when I got rejected last year and this year I had plenty of time to understand what I did wrong, identify my weaknesses, and work on them, and as a result, my answers this year were vastly different than last year. I've heard of many people being rejected one year only to get straight in the next, and now I can include myself in that statistic. 

If you're only interested in McGill then I see no reason to do a MSc. I'm doing one right now because  I wanted to try and get an interview at U of T - funny thing is I still haven't heard back from them and now I'm going to reject my interview if I'm offered one :)

Keep your head up! I know how painful it is but you now have a whole year to figure out what went wrong this year and work on it! You will be SO much more prepared than the greater majority of applicants next year!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Vicodin,

 

I'm sorry to hear about your refusal - I was also refused post-interview last year and was admitted this year. I didn't change much in my CVPN, but I remained involved in all the same activities I was doing previously. You don't want to give them any reason to think you're any less passionate the second time around. It's never a bad thing to be able to add one or two new things (ie, certifications, publications, even hobbies).

 

My suggestion to you would be to first contact Admissions for feedback on your interview. They won't give you details but last year I was able to obtain my pre- and post-interview ranking - this information is also really helpful in terms of gauging your odds at another interview next year. I was about middle of the pack pre-interview last year (ranked around 125th of 250 interviewed), so I estimated my chances at an interview this year to be good. They also break down your ranking for your academics and CVPN separately, so if you find out your CVPN ranking wasn't stellar, you can work on that for next time.

 

In terms of finding a job, if you don't work in some biomedical capacity (ie: research assistant, administration at a clinic, etc), I would highly suggest you at least get involved in some health-related volunteer or community work. This not only shows that you're still actively involved and interested in the biomedical field, but the more things you do, the more you have to draw upon in your one-on-one interview, scenarios, and CVPN essays. The essays may or may not change for next year's cycle - they were different this year than the last.

 

Also, please keep in mind: the next time you interview at McGill, you will have a significant advantage over everyone else doing the interviews the first time. I promise you that this is true. I didn't believe it at first, in fact I felt MORE nervous going into it a second time because I was doubting my judgement. All of that changed on the actual interview day. Just being familiar with the space, the types of stations, etc, gives you a huge advantage. This year I really tried not to overthink it. My interview wasn't perfect by any means, but I identified the areas I could have done better in last time and made damned sure I didn't make those same mistakes again.

 

If you really want it, you'll make it happen.

 

Best of luck to you!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I also forgot to mention, if you submitted your science prerequisite grades instead of your MCAT and there is one grade (or two?) that is bringing your basic science GPA down, I would consider taking that class again. Last fall I re-did a class I had gotten a B- in during undergrad, which brought my science GPA up from a 3.66 to about a 3.9. Everything counts, even if it's only 20% of the final decision.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I also forgot to mention, if you submitted your science prerequisite grades instead of your MCAT and there is one grade (or two?) that is bringing your basic science GPA down, I would consider taking that class again. Last fall I re-did a class I had gotten a B- in during undergrad, which brought my science GPA up from a 3.66 to about a 3.9. Everything counts, even if it's only 20% of the final decision.

Great post Caribou!!

Vicodin- In addition to the PM. I kept thinking about your post, as something about it seemed eerily familiar to me. That's when I realized, I made a similar post 5 years ago (situations were different though). Keep at it, and you'll get in.

 

here's the post if you want a laugh (reading my own post gave me a headache, I apologize in advance for the grammar :mellow: ):

http://forums.premed101.com/index.php?/topic/49293-help-please/?hl=doc5#entry553777

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to everyone who replied or PM'd me to share their story and to give support and guidance

 

I really hope whoever has had a rejection, regardless of where they are in the process or in life, feels supported. Even though it's all anonymous, being able to vent and normalize my fears has helped me so much. Feeling so bad and being able to lift myself back up only made me that much more humbled and thankful for the future. If anyone is ever feeling down, please don't hesitate to message me.

 

Thank you again :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you to everyone who replied and the countless who PM'd me to share their story and to give support and guidance :)

 

I really hope whoever has gone through a rejection or is having any struggles of their own, regardless of where they are in the process or in life, feels the tremendous amount of support I have felt from all of you. Even though it's all anonymous, being able to vent and normalize my fears and sadness helped me so much mentally. I have always advocated for and been involved in mental health awareness. Feeling so incredibly down and being able to lift myself back up only made me that much more humbled and thankful for the future. If anyone is ever feeling broken down or alone, please don't hesitate to message me.

 

Thank you all again!!  :)

 

I also know what it's like to fail the first time and come back hard the 2nd time.... I just wanted to wish you luck bro.

 

- G

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Vicodin, have you considered writing the MCAT as well as the TFI to give yourself the opportunity to apply to the rest of Canada as well as the French schools? I realize McGill may be your first choice, as it is to many, but at the end of the day you'll be an MD regardless of your school. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've already written my MCAT and I am able to apply to several schools in Ontario, but decided to only apply to McGill this year partly because of application costs, but mainly I figured if it didn't work out this year, I don't really mind having a year to travel and experience new things. If I don't get an interview next year then I will rewrite the MCAT to be able to apply to even more schools.

I speak French fluently but I am not professional enough to be interviewed in French... womp womp

Hey Vicodin, have you considered writing the MCAT as well as the TFI to give yourself the opportunity to apply to the rest of Canada as well as the French schools? I realize McGill may be your first choice, as it is to many, but at the end of the day you'll be an MD regardless of your school.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I will add my opinion on this.

 

1 - You are almost there.

 

It may sound very basic but I think that you simply have to make yourself a better person this year. The medical admission path is often a long one where you encounters numerous downfalls. Nonetheless, you must never forget to look at the big picture : you are at the very last step of the admission process. You aced your GPA, you have a fantastic CVPN and you got the MMI interview. Don't be too harsh on yourself.

 

Sometimes, we forget that we still have a chance. Not every dream can be pursued with the option : i'll try again next year.

 

One of my friends was an Olympian. He left university for 4 years to land a spot on the ski team. He finished 4th at the Olympics. Never won a medal. He regrets it so much. He spent the next 4 years training to pursue that medal. He wasn't called to join the team. 

 

2 - You will have regrets

 

Would you rather spend the next 40 years of your life working in a job that you don't particularly appreciate and having regrets or, would you prefer take this year, or even the next two years, to make yourself a better candidate and finally land your dream job?

 

 

3 - It is worth the investment

 

Yes, I will now speak about money, salary and medicine. Something, of course, that no one ever thought about, right ? Well all I can say is that the return on your investment will be worth it because the medical field allows the physicians to benefit from excellent financial conditions. Even if you 'loose' on year or two. Moreover, as soon as you are admitted, you can benefit from a loan of 250K$ at a very low interest rate. 

 

4 - Make a smart + conservative choice

 

What I would personally do is try to get real work exposure in the healthcare field at this point. If you could use your degree to work in a management position in a hospital, or in any position that would allow you to have a contact with healthcare professionals, patients and stakeholders.

 

Why ? Because it will simply allow you to go on with your life without putting your dream aside. Also, in the case that your admission doesn't work out next year, you still have a backup plan. Does that mean that you are leaving your dream behind? No. You are simply making conservative choices and I am about to follow the same path this year.

 

Good luck. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...