Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Recommended Posts

I am debating b/w the three amazing PT programs and I was wondering which program you guys are leaning towards! 

 

Western:

Small Class Size -- Probably the best endorsement of the program. With only 55 students (~1/2 U of T), instructors and peers are able to facilitate the growth of students at the personal level. I have worked with diverse PTs throughout my undergrad at a variety of settings and there's no doubt that MSK/Orthopedic is THE foundation of ANY physiotherapeutic intervention and at Western, I know I'll get the top-quality education regarding ortho (I'm aware that all systems are inter-related e.g. cardio-resp!!). Not sure if everyone's had a chance to go over each school's timetable but Western's seems to make the most sense for me. They spend the first 8 months in lectures & labs covering foundations (gross anatomy, functional anatomy, professional practice, assessment-integrated,regional, neuro, cardio-resp). Despite all of my previous PT experiences, I know I would be more comfortable & confident after extensive period of in-class practices & labs. Just before the first placement begins, MPT students are taught based on settings of practice (Acute, Rehab, Community, Clinic) which makes perfect sense. I got to visit Elborn College last fall and I really appreciated the close-knit, positive atmosphere there. Everyone was super friendly and helpful in answering my questions. Donna Beer (Admission Assistant) actually introduced me to a bunch of first and second year PT students, I was literally in one of their labs for an hour asking questions and getting to know them, they all seemed super bright and passionate. They were all rocking Western PT polo shirts which was nice to see  :)

 

Toronto

Placements -- When I visited 500 University Avenue for the CAP, I was most impressed by its location. Also, my supervisor got her PT degree at U of T so she would always boast about the program (Cardio-resp!!!). Surrounded by many hospitals, the program definitely has the highest emphasis on research. For me, the main downside of the program is the number of students (~90). During the tour, I had the opportunity to observe their lab and it seemed really hectic with so many students/beds in one tiny room. Also, the tutorials and labs are divided into diff. sections so you may not know your classmates as well. I personally prefer city lifestyle and didactic lecture style so U of T may be a good option for me but I really admire Western's family-like vibe....

 

Queen's

Unfortunately, I don't know too much about the program. I honestly thought I was going to get rejected here but I guess the hard work paid off. I've heard that there aren't as many placement options compared to Toronto and Western.

 

For me, I am leaning towards Western at this point!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm currently leaning towards Queen's, but that would be because it's the closest to me - I'm about 3 hours east of Queen's. I've heard all the schools are excellent, as well as some of the points you mentioned. Thank you for listing points about each of the schools - it's really helpful!

 

I've spoken to PTs who went to each of those three schools, and they all really enjoyed their experiences. I haven't had the chance to ask them more questions, but I will soon.

 

Another aspect to consider is the location of each school - downtown Toronto is a great atmosphere, but the cost of living is super high! Toronto's campus is also interspersed with office buildings, so less of a campus vibe. With Queen's and Western the rent would be much lower, and they're in university towns. While I really enjoyed the times I've been to Toronto, I'd also like the experience of a university town.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Toronto

Placements -- When I visited 500 University Avenue for the CAP, I was most impressed by its location. Also, my supervisor got her PT degree at U of T so she would always boast about the program (Cardio-resp!!!). Surrounded by many hospitals, the program definitely has the highest emphasis on research. For me, the main downside of the program is the number of students (~90). During the tour, I had the opportunity to observe their lab and it seemed really hectic with so many students/beds in one tiny room. Also, the tutorials and labs are divided into diff. sections so you may not know your classmates as well. I personally prefer city lifestyle and didactic lecture style so U of T may be a good option for me but I really admire Western's family-like vibe....

 

 

Hi there!! I'm a current PT student at UofT and just wanted to clarify a few things mentioned!

 

The lab that you saw was only one lab - we have two identical labs on either side of the main PT floor with 50+ beds in each (not to mention 8 additional private study rooms each with plinths in them).  Each of the large lab rooms are hooked up with video and audio equipment and ~6 TVs - which project demonstrations to both rooms while volunteer clinicians wander and assist you personally.  This set up is actually really helpful as you don't have a large group of people crowding around one demonstrator!

As for the class size, it is pretty big compared to most schools, and after two years with them - you feel like a large (usually crazy) family that have gone through the trenches together! (You also get some amazing career connections for the future.)

 

Regardless, all Canadian PT schools provide you with a great education - whichever school you choose will be right for you!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...