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How To Build My Confidence During The Interviews And Not Sound Robotic?


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On two occasions, I was given the feedback that my interview response sounds robotic. Also, the personality that I present during my interviews is not my actual personality. I tend to become rigid during interviews, which leads me to sound robotic.

 

I am not sure how to overcome this. I interviewed twice so far, and I just need few points to get into medical school. It seems that the interviews are my biggest challenge now. 

 

I feel that the interview environment is so artificial, and for some reason I can't be myself.

 

Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks :)

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The interview is a trainable skill. Like any skill, the better you are, the more confident you'll be. With good effort and appropriate feedback, even the most socially awkward individual can present themselves as a competent, likeable person for 30 minutes. Obviously it will help if you're naturally outgoing, but it's not necessary.

 

Prior to any interview, I usually do some kind of dedicated practice in the 3 weeks leading up to it. This includes mock interviews and personal recitation of prepared answers to common questions. The exact amount of time you need depends on what your baseline is. If you have lots of interview experience then you'll need less time, or none at all. Try to get at least 3 people to interview you as a panel. Ideally, at least one of them should be kind of a jerk so you're guaranteed to get criticized for something. In each interview, have them ask you a combination of questions you've prepared (to help build your confidence), and questions that you haven't seen before (to help adapt you to improvising answers). Their feedback should be constructive, less about the content of your answers, and more on the delivery, as well as non-verbal cues (eye contact, posture, gestures, etc). After that, do another interview and try to incorporate their advice. If necessary, slow things down, work on something specific and then speed it back up. Repeat this process until you're comfortable. Have your mock interviewers ask themselves, "Would I hire this person?", "Do I want to work with this person for the next 4 years"? If you get a consistent yes from all three, then your interviewing skills will probably be acceptable during the real thing.

 

If you have a monotone voice (and can't fix it through deliberate intonation), the most important thing is to slow down what you're saying, so it doesn't come out as a giant blur.

 

This is just a general starting point, and likely nothing you haven't heard before. It's about practice. That's all you can do.

 

Good Luck

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The interview is a trainable skill. Like any skill, the better you are, the more confident you'll be. With good effort and appropriate feedback, even the most socially awkward individual can present themselves as a competent, likeable person for 30 minutes. Obviously it will help if you're naturally outgoing, but it's not necessary.

 

Prior to any interview, I usually do some kind of dedicated practice in the 3 weeks leading up to it. This includes mock interviews and personal recitation of prepared answers to common questions. The exact amount of time you need depends on what your baseline is. If you have lots of interview experience then you'll need less time, or none at all. Try to get at least 3 people to interview you as a panel. Ideally, at least one of them should be kind of a jerk so you're guaranteed to get criticized for something. In each interview, have them ask you a combination of questions you've prepared (to help build your confidence), and questions that you haven't seen before (to help adapt you to improvising answers). Their feedback should be constructive, less about the content of your answers, and more on the delivery, as well as non-verbal cues (eye contact, posture, gestures, etc). After that, do another interview and try to incorporate their advice. If necessary, slow things down, work on something specific and then speed it back up. Repeat this process until you're comfortable. Have your mock interviewers ask themselves, "Would I hire this person?", "Do I want to work with this person for the next 4 years"? If you get a consistent yes from all three, then your interviewing skills will probably be acceptable during the real thing.

 

If you have a monotone voice (and can't fix it through deliberate intonation), the most important thing is to slow down what you're saying, so it doesn't come out as a giant blur.

 

This is just a general starting point, and likely nothing you haven't heard before. It's about practice. That's all you can do.

 

Good Luck

Hi interpid86, my voice is not monotonous. However, I think my style in answering the question is a bit robotic. It does not happen all the time, but sometimes it does. Do you have any tips for the MMIs? I am doing MMI interviews, not panel interviews.

 

Thank you so much for your input :)

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Hi interpid86, my voice is not monotonous. However, I think my style in answering the question is a bit robotic. It does not happen all the time, but sometimes it does. Do you have any tips for the MMIs? I am doing MMI interviews, not panel interviews.

 

Thank you so much for your input :)

 

 

My experience has only been with panel interviews. I've seen MMI questions and scenarios, and I have an idea of how I would personally prepare for it, but I'll leave it to those who have actually done one to give you more concrete advice.

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The interview is a trainable skill. Like any skill, the better you are, the more confident you'll be. With good effort and appropriate feedback, even the most socially awkward individual can present themselves as a competent, likeable person for 30 minutes. Obviously it will help if you're naturally outgoing, but it's not necessary.

 

Prior to any interview, I usually do some kind of dedicated practice in the 3 weeks leading up to it. This includes mock interviews and personal recitation of prepared answers to common questions. The exact amount of time you need depends on what your baseline is. If you have lots of interview experience then you'll need less time, or none at all. Try to get at least 3 people to interview you as a panel. Ideally, at least one of them should be kind of a jerk so you're guaranteed to get criticized for something. In each interview, have them ask you a combination of questions you've prepared (to help build your confidence), and questions that you haven't seen before (to help adapt you to improvising answers). Their feedback should be constructive, less about the content of your answers, and more on the delivery, as well as non-verbal cues (eye contact, posture, gestures, etc). After that, do another interview and try to incorporate their advice. If necessary, slow things down, work on something specific and then speed it back up. Repeat this process until you're comfortable. Have your mock interviewers ask themselves, "Would I hire this person?", "Do I want to work with this person for the next 4 years"? If you get a consistent yes from all three, then your interviewing skills will probably be acceptable during the real thing.

 

If you have a monotone voice (and can't fix it through deliberate intonation), the most important thing is to slow down what you're saying, so it doesn't come out as a giant blur.

 

This is just a general starting point, and likely nothing you haven't heard before. It's about practice. That's all you can do.

 

Good Luck

Very smart answer something that I could add is to do Toastmasters. 

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Hey! I recorded voice memos and tried my hardest to be honest with myself in regards to my authenticity. Talk about things that get you excited and are passionate about! Talk about things you are knowledgeable about! I think your enthusiasm will be second nature!

 

I found that if you sound robotic, your transitions may be too abrupt! Though sign posting is helpful, I would caution that it can sound rehearsed.

 

Good luck :)

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