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I started practicing around 2 weeks before my interview although I feel I've always performed relatively well at interviews in the past. Through teaching and mentorship related activities, I've had plenty of opportunity to refine communication skills. Grad school was also an excellent time to learn how to deliver a point in a clear and concise manner. Do you have experiences that lend themselves to improving communication skills? This may ultimately decide how much time you dedicate to preparing.

 

When it came down to preparing, I just went through the available material online and made sure, above all else, I had a good sense of timing. Realistically, there's no meaningful way to prepare for an MMI beyond familiarizing yourself with the formatting. I think it's good to have a good understanding of topics that are high yield in some schools (ex issues in our health care system) but having stock responses prepared also runs the risk of sounding formulaic.

 

Length of prep time varies by person. There's really no magic number. In my cycle there were students who started preparing the day they found out they got an interview and were still unsuccessful. Others had a week of prep and were successful. This of course is anecdotal so take it with a grain of salt.

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I have applied this year and not sure when/how to practise for the MMI invite should I receive one...Interview invites come out early Feb with interviews happening a couple of weeks after...to those who received an interview in the past when did you start practising? Did you start practising before you knew you got the interview? And more importantly how should I prepare for a U of C MMI?? Thanks 

 

 

I did practice scenarios with a friend on and off throughout.. We were both pretty busy so it wasn't super frequent.. You can find lots of examples online. You definitely want to practice coming up with logical and coherent content in a short time frame. I don't think the "content" is that super important in general.. although some ethical knowledge is always good.

 

Oh and I would add - make sure your friend is willing to be brutally honest. It doesn't help if they say "I think you did a good job... next scenario!"

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I ran through a few scenarios in the week leading up to the interview. Practice was more for timing than anything else. You will find that people have different approaches. Some people practice for months. Others much less. Try to find something that works for you.

 

 

I haven't taken any formal ethics course or anything like that, do you recommend I read Doing Right?

 

Nope. You don't need any specific knowledge to tackle the UofC interview scenarios

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So its not too late to start practising (timing, scenarios) when notified if you get an interview or not?

 

You do notice that those people above who did practice a few weeks before their interviews had experience and practice for many years before, called life experience. 

 

I don't recommend you practice a few weeks before if you're literal in your OP. 

 

I'm on the other end of the spectrum... I also had a lot of experience before my interviews but also prepared hard, pretty much for years. I wrote about my journey in the non-trad success forums and also commented on past posts on how I prepared (you can look them up if you like). That said I don't expect most people to do what I did... I just wanted it so bad that I was willing to work obscene hours to become better. 

 

- G

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So its not too late to start practising (timing, scenarios) when notified if you get an interview or not?

I mean, to be more blunt... you're the only person that can answer this question. If you have no idea, run through a couple of scenarios with someone who is objective and listen to their feedback. Take whatever time you feel you need to do the work. 

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I mean, to be more blunt... you're the only person that can answer this question. If you have no idea, run through a couple of scenarios with someone who is objective and listen to their feedback. Take whatever time you feel you need to do the work. 

 

Objective and are actually good at thinking critically + interviews. There's a lot of objective people that honestly don't know how to interview well. 

 

- G

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I started practicing in November for interviews that occurred in February and March. I knew I needed all of that time because I honestly sucked at getting my ideas out in a coherent and well organized way. How much time you need will depend on you and how comfortable you are with the MMI process. 

 

If I can give one word of advice though, it would be to practice with other people as much as you can. You have to get comfortable talking about a lot of different topics, on the spot, in front of strangers. Make a group, make a schedule to practice and stick to it! Good luck with everything! 

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Just another applicant here (interviewed at the UofC twice before)... My full-time work and life-commitments currently create constraints around my preparation, so after submitting the app I had to think of a way to challenge my thought process prior to a potential interview that worked for my situation, at least for now. After some searching and trial and error, I started listening to news/talk radio (AM 770 in Calgary for example) and some podcasts that are heavily filled with debates. I know it's not ideal, and practicing in a group adds an important angle to preparation, but I think that listening to debates involving various topics and points of view would show limitations to anyone's views and improve (hopefully) critical thinking... and also is entertaining ;)

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