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Politeness / A$$ Kissing


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I was practicing for mmi with someone who approaches each station with "buttering up" the interviewer, ie saying things like "thank you so much for having me, it's an honour to be here". and then when they ask the question: "thank you so much for the question/ that's a really interesting question"

 

What are your guys' thoughts? Good idea/bad idea? 

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I was practicing for mmi with someone who approaches each station with "buttering up" the interviewer, ie saying things like "thank you so much for having me, it's an honour to be hear". and then when they ask the question: "thank you so much for the question/ that's a really interesting question"

 

What are your guys' thoughts? Good idea/bad idea? 

 

 

I don't see a problem with the first quote, but the second one makes me gag. Really seems too much to thank the interview for asking a question. That's like thanking the cashier at mcDonalds for taking your order. 

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I don't see a problem with the first quote, but the second one makes me gag. Really seems too much to thank the interview for asking a question. That's like thanking the cashier at mcDonalds for taking your order. 

 

Do people not thank the cashier at Mcdonalds when they take your order.....? 

 

In all seriousness, I agree that you definitely should not thank the interviewer for the question. 

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I was practicing for mmi with someone who approaches each station with "buttering up" the interviewer, ie saying things like "thank you so much for having me, it's an honour to be hear". and then when they ask the question: "thank you so much for the question/ that's a really interesting question"

 

What are your guys' thoughts? Good idea/bad idea? 

It sounds pretty ridiculous, fake, and quite silly.

People in general hate that kind of behaviour.

No, absolutely don't do it.

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? That's not a bad thing to do lol

 

As to OP, I usually say thank you to the interviewer/actor when I leave. As to the "interesting question", I would say it if I thought it was a particularly interesting question. Don't force anything though.

yes. 100% agreed

saying thank you for your time when you leave is completely fine. But it is my honor, bla bla bla, no

And for the interesting question, as SunAndMoon said...

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One thing that I was told about giving talks is that if somebody asks you a question it smooths the way if you start with "that's an interesting/good question" so I do sometimes do that. Unless I genuinely think it's a ridiculous question and then I don't. Also gives you an extra second to frame a response. In an interview situation I guess it comes off a little more ass kiss-y though.

 

I think the most I'd say is "thanks for your time" at the end.

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Hey guys !

 

I have kind of the same question but concerning a panel interview.

Would you start by thanking the interviewers for their time and for the opportunity, etc ? 

 

(My first interview is coming up this weekend)

 

Thanks a lot ! 

 

 

I think thanking them at the end of the interview is more appropriate. Best of Luck in your interview :) 

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I was practicing for mmi with someone who approaches each station with "buttering up" the interviewer, ie saying things like "thank you so much for having me, it's an honour to be here". and then when they ask the question: "thank you so much for the question/ that's a really interesting question"

 

What are your guys' thoughts? Good idea/bad idea? 

 

bad idea if you ask me

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  • 3 months later...
On 3/17/2017 at 11:41 AM, snazij said:

I was practicing for mmi with someone who approaches each station with "buttering up" the interviewer, ie saying things like "thank you so much for having me, it's an honour to be here". and then when they ask the question: "thank you so much for the question/ that's a really interesting question"

 

What are your guys' thoughts? Good idea/bad idea? 

Worst idea. They're not idiots! They know exactly what you're doing. 

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On 3/17/2017 at 1:00 PM, ellorie said:

One thing that I was told about giving talks is that if somebody asks you a question it smooths the way if you start with "that's an interesting/good question" so I do sometimes do that. Unless I genuinely think it's a ridiculous question and then I don't. Also gives you an extra second to frame a response. In an interview situation I guess it comes off a little more ass kiss-y though.

 

I think the most I'd say is "thanks for your time" at the end.

This is a better, subtle, way of approaching the intended politeness your MMI friend was hoping to convey. 

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Having interviewed applicants for other professional programs other than medicine, I can tell you straight up that being overly polite or saying things that have been mentioned above (regarding being overly polite) will get you nothing but an eye roll; it does not do you any good. You are being assessed on your ability to think critically, analyze a question, and adequately articulate your thoughts to the assessor. A simple "Hello, my name is [x], nice to meet you" at the beginning will do you just fine. If you'd like, a "thank-you for your time" at the end is also appropriate. Anything else is overkill.

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On 3/17/2017 at 7:41 AM, snazij said:

I was practicing for mmi with someone who approaches each station with "buttering up" the interviewer, ie saying things like "thank you so much for having me, it's an honour to be here". and then when they ask the question: "thank you so much for the question/ that's a really interesting question"

 

What are your guys' thoughts? Good idea/bad idea? 

 

I'll be honest, the first time, it's fine. Cool. Whatever. "Thank you for being so receptive" I would think to myself (if I were an interviewer of course). The second time I would just want to slap the transparent bastard.

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 3/17/2017 at 10:41 AM, snazij said:

I was practicing for mmi with someone who approaches each station with "buttering up" the interviewer, ie saying things like "thank you so much for having me, it's an honour to be here". and then when they ask the question: "thank you so much for the question/ that's a really interesting question"

 

What are your guys' thoughts? Good idea/bad idea? 

I just remembered something relating to this. I do know some people who say "that's a really interesting question" to buy themselves time to think of an answer, and it's an interview strategy I've been told once or twice. I know I'm guilty of using this as a clutch to avoid using "um" to fill the awkward silence. Any thoughts on this?

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8 hours ago, lulu95 said:

I just remembered something relating to this. I do know some people who say "that's a really interesting question" to buy themselves time to think of an answer, and it's an interview strategy I've been told once or twice. I know I'm guilty of using this as a clutch to avoid using "um" to fill the awkward silence. Any thoughts on this?

If it's sincere and you look pensive it's fine. If you use it excessively as a conversational crutch while saying it in an 'uptalk' tone then it's probably annoying/weird.

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10 hours ago, lulu95 said:

I just remembered something relating to this. I do know some people who say "that's a really interesting question" to buy themselves time to think of an answer, and it's an interview strategy I've been told once or twice. I know I'm guilty of using this as a clutch to avoid using "um" to fill the awkward silence. Any thoughts on this?

Yea it's a good strategy if you use it for a question that is actually interesting lol... Don't say "that's a really interesting question" if they're asking you to describe your teamwork abilities or everytime they ask a follow-up. If you're going to need time to think for a follow-up, I don't think there's any problem with just saying "let me think about that" or whatever variation, and just think quietly for the next 10 seconds. It's better than stretching an "um...." or starting a thought or sentence that you cant complete because you haven't thought it through.

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On 8/4/2017 at 4:21 PM, lulu95 said:

I just remembered something relating to this. I do know some people who say "that's a really interesting question" to buy themselves time to think of an answer, and it's an interview strategy I've been told once or twice. I know I'm guilty of using this as a clutch to avoid using "um" to fill the awkward silence. Any thoughts on this?

There's lots of methods interviewees employ to buy a bit of time to think through an answer and I generally don't have a preference which is used. Even "can I think about that for a minute" is fine with me. Heck, even awkward silence works! I don't care about speed, I care about approach, content and presentation. Taking a bit of time to answer a question, regardless of how it's done, is a fine approach in my books, especially with some of the weirder questions that tend to pop up.

Where "that's a really interesting question" or other rehearsed stalls can run into trouble is if it's clear flattery and not related to the question, as TARS mentioned, or if it's clearly being used to buy time and that time isn't used effectively. That is, if you say "that's a really interesting question" and then don't have a particularly good answer, I'd probably dislike that even more than just a mediocre response that they took some time to think about. Candidates struggling with a question is common and I won't hold that against them beyond the score for that question itself. Candidates struggling with a question and using rehearsed language to placate me in an attempt to cover up those struggles? Yeah, that's a problem with both approach and presentation, on top of content, and I will rate a candidate lower on their overall communication skills for that. No one's perfect in medicine, but I want colleagues who screw up honestly far more than I want people who attempt to cover up their mistakes (especially if they're good at it).

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