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So I've been reading that last years stats are lower than usual from a previous thread so I thought I would just discuss this topic.

 

Based off the stats they posted, is this actually true? Will the score averages increase substantially? This also ties in with how I've been hearing about high scores in general from applicants and I'm kind of curious as to how this sets me up.

 

 

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So I've been reading that last years stats are lower than usual from a previous thread so I thought I would just discuss this topic.

 

Based off the stats they posted, is this actually true? Will the score averages increase substantially? This also ties in with how I've been hearing about high scores in general from applicants and I'm kind of curious as to how this sets me up.

 

They will probably be the same in my opinion. The total number of applicants was roughly the same as the previous years, and the averages were also similar in terms of percentiles, except for those that wrote the older version of the MCAT. The min MCAT was fairly low though for both versions of the MCAT, comparatively speaking; those individuals probably had super high GPA's, high rural/diversity coefficients, and killed the interview.

 

I wish U of M was a little more transparent with this type of information. I would love to know whether the distribution of MCAT scores is skewed right or left for accepted applicants.     

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based on previous years, MCAT is skewed left while GPA is skewed right

Hi there, 

I don't want to sound incompetent but I would really like to know what you meant when you said "MCAT is skewed Left while GPA is skewed right".

 

How does this affect a future applicant who has a low GPA but has a high MCAT and vice-versa.

 

Thank you in advance!

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Well if you look at the admission statistics for previous years, the median is often lower for the MCAT than the average. This means your bell curve for MCAT scores are actually shifted to the left. So for example lets say your MCAT score is the average for people invited to the interview, then your percentile ranking among all the candidates is going to be a little higher than 50%, whereas if it was not skewed at all, you ranking would be exactly 50%. But I could be wrong to, im not an expert at stts by any means, and this trend couldve changed in recent years, so my advice would be just try to score as high as possible lol.

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If that's the actual trend, your logic is right! If you think it will be roughly the same, I guess I'll quickly look over the old stats again.

 

Edit: Quickly looked at Class of 2019 and the median was 10.5 while the average was 10.6, so someone with the average is for sure better than 50% of the applicants though I'm guessing only slightly? The values are pretty close.

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Well if you look at the admission statistics for previous years, the median is often lower for the MCAT than the average. This means your bell curve for MCAT scores are actually shifted to the left. So for example lets say your MCAT score is the average for people invited to the interview, then your percentile ranking among all the candidates is going to be a little higher than 50%, whereas if it was not skewed at all, you ranking would be exactly 50%. But I could be wrong to, im not an expert at stts by any means, and this trend couldve changed in recent years, so my advice would be just try to score as high as possible lol.

 

The distribution would be right skewed since the median is less than the mean. Don't early offers come out in a few weeks? I wouldn't be surprised if they choose not to post any stats until after the cycle. 

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Question: Based on what you said, what is the likelihood for someone with a MCAT of 517 and an AGPA of 4.39 to get in? Could an average interview really get you in like I heard from a lot of people? My friend has these metrics and has been nervous af

It might not. I know someone who had 3rd quintile and above average GPA and MCAT who was not accepted. It depends on the applicant pool. I speculate that the 2020 class had a very high interview average, which offset the MCAT average.

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Hmm... Okay, theoretically speaking What is the chance of an applicant who has the bare minimum GPA (3.3) but has a well above average MCAT (say >520) and a very high interview average? I know that there are other factors to consider such as rural, socioeconomic, etc. but let's say this applicant has all of those other factors. Would that applicant still have a shot?

 

ps: I'm not talking about myself, I'm only theoretically speaking. Thank you!

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I'm sure any little bit helps. If someone can get in with a 498, I'm certain it has a factor.

 

Really?!?! Someone got in with a 498 in the MCAT? Maybe that applicant had a strong GPA to help balance out his/her MCAT situation as well as have a high interview score with the other factors playing in his/her favour.

I need to take another look at the new stats. Good for that applicant for getting in! :) 

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  • 3 weeks later...

So I've been reading that last years stats are lower than usual from a previous thread so I thought I would just discuss this topic.

 

Based off the stats they posted, is this actually true? Will the score averages increase substantially? This also ties in with how I've been hearing about high scores in general from applicants and I'm kind of curious as to how this sets me up.

Hi, I heard from a friend in the faculty who got in 2yrs ago that the reason [not sure if this is 100%] for the "lower" stats last year is due to more emphasis on the rural scoring and (especially) SES bonus points. Think they're still figuring the SES out somewhat.

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Hi, I heard from a friend in the faculty who got in 2yrs ago that the reason [not sure if this is 100%] for the "lower" stats last year is due to more emphasis on the rural scoring and (especially) SES bonus points. Think they're still figuring the SES out somewhat.

The rural coefficient works the same as it always has - there has been no additional emphasis on it. The only difference is the SES multiplier (if they even formally used it and didn't just put it in to collect information). Also our class interviewed very well which allowed lower scores in other areas.

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