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On 7/15/2017 at 3:20 PM, Lactic Folly said:

Agree, I don't think it would detract. It would help you stand out as a bit unique, if you chose to emphasize it. The extent to which it might help would really depend on whether the person reading your application values the MBA or not.

I have heard that some view it negatively in that you are not 100% dedicated to medicine and may have some profit motive. Maybe I am just reading too much into this. 

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1) Isn't it a moot point if you are already registered in the program?

2) The program at Tufts describes their aim of producing graduates who function "not only as outstanding clinicians but also as expert managers, innovative leaders, and entrepreneurial thinkers who can navigate — and improve upon — the system in order to better the lives of patients and their families." Does this resonate with you? Can you apply the leadership and communication skills you are presumably learning in your program to convey your experience in this manner?

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On 7/15/2017 at 2:50 PM, qnzjlo said:

Does doing the MD/MBA joint program add to your chances of matching to a competitive residency? I am doing my MD/MBA at McGill and was thinking if that would either (a) help or (b) detract from my potential residency application. Does anyone know or have any thoughts on this?

I don't think it will hurt, if you sell it more as a tool to help you in terms of leadership and management of healthcare systems and improving our current healthcare system, it will look good. Definitely, to a lay person it does sound like a person who decided on doing an MBA is someone who is interested in the business side of medicine and that might not look so good for some possibly. 

 

Its definitely only a program I would consider if you truly are hoping to get something specific out of it and not any old MBA would do, it should be something that in its curriculum can be geared towards you as a healthcare professional. In general, if you are looking to practice in Canada, there really isn't as much opportunities for the MBA to be useful I would say, but if you know what you are going after by doing an MBA, do it. 

 

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10 hours ago, Edict said:

I don't think it will hurt, if you sell it more as a tool to help you in terms of leadership and management of healthcare systems and improving our current healthcare system, it will look good. Definitely, to a lay person it does sound like a person who decided on doing an MBA is someone who is interested in the business side of medicine and that might not look so good for some possibly. 

 

Its definitely only a program I would consider if you truly are hoping to get something specific out of it and not any old MBA would do, it should be something that in its curriculum can be geared towards you as a healthcare professional. In general, if you are looking to practice in Canada, there really isn't as much opportunities for the MBA to be useful I would say, but if you know what you are going after by doing an MBA, do it. 

 

My ultimate goal is probably a sr management position within a hospital or working on public health policy for the government. I heard the MD/MBA is much more sought after in the states? I heard that many management consultants like McKinsey or pharma hire them right after med school w/o residency?

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5 hours ago, Bambi said:

Notwithstanding your ultimate goal, I believe you are well advised to do your residency and to become qualified in your field of choice at a minimum. Clinical experience in the field can only prove helpful to you in achieving your ultimate goal and in making you even more valuable.

Thanks Bambi! 

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Not a perfect analogy, but a lawyer with litigation experience will be a far more valuable asset as in-house counsel of a large firm that has considerable litigation. Law firms often have an army of lawyers doing litigation and they are often wasteful in assigning too many lawyers to a case,C especially at the litigation stage, where there could be 5 lawyers at the table when only 2 are required. When experienced in this game, a good in-house counsel can easily pay their annual salary in just overseeing one case.

Equally, if you have some experience in the trenches of medicine and in a hospital setting, you will be better informed in making management decisions having had this experience. Moreover, you will have become qualified to practice the profession and not just having obtained your medical degree. This, to me, is an advantage. 

Your management position will always be there, so build up your profile to maximize your future career opportunities, do not necessarily jump at the first interesting position with an alluring salary as you have a very long career ahead and need to be strategic in your choices.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 7/26/2017 at 9:31 AM, Bambi PGY3 said:

Not a perfect analogy, but a lawyer with litigation experience will be a far more valuable asset as in-house counsel of a large firm that has considerable litigation. Law firms often have an army of lawyers doing litigation and they are often wasteful in assigning too many lawyers to a case,C especially at the litigation stage, where there could be 5 lawyers at the table when only 2 are required. When experienced in this game, a good in-house counsel can easily pay their annual salary in just overseeing one case.

Equally, if you have some experience in the trenches of medicine and in a hospital setting, you will be better informed in making management decisions having had this experience. Moreover, you will have become qualified to practice the profession and not just having obtained your medical degree. This, to me, is an advantage. 

Your management position will always be there, so build up your profile to maximize your future career opportunities, do not necessarily jump at the first interesting position with an alluring salary as you have a very long career ahead and need to be strategic in your choices.

Great points - many thanks for your well-thought out contributions :-)

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