Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Recommended Posts

Hi guys, I'm about to start university. I applied to two programs in my city same major, but one starts Jan 2018 and one starts Sept 2018. Some dental schools use two or three full years for GPA calculation, and they say "Sept to April". 

If I were to start in Jan, would my "three years" be: Jan to April, Sept to April, Sept to April, Sept to Jan?   Or my first semester "Jan to April" won't be used for calculation?

 

 

Thank you! 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Super Nova said:

jan to april will be considered one semester, not two. So when they say two or three FULL YEARS, that means sept-april

Thank you for your reply SN. Maybe you didn't understand what I was saying.

I know many schools require full years (Sept to April), but if I were to start in Jan, I will have a half year first, then full years. I wanted to know if they would take that first semester (Jan to April) into account (by combining it with the next semester making it a full year because that would be my first year.)  Or they won't use my GPA for calculation because it's not a full Sept to April school year. They will start from Sept 2018 and take full years from then. 

I hope I'm not making you more confused. Thank you again! 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Whether or not it is included in the GPA is based on full time studies or not, rather than when you started. This is school dependent. Some schools calculate your GPA using courses that were taking when you were a full time student (which is at least 3 courses in a semester in most cases). So if you are taking at least this amount in the jan-april semester, then yes it would most likely be included in the GPA. You are confusing GPA calculation with minimum undergraduate education requirement. They are treated separately. If the school in question required 3 years of undergrad, than your jan-april semester would be 0.5 of a year (assuming you were full time to their standards). Of course they would combine it with the next semester, it does not just get forgotten thats for sure. But it wont really matter because Canadian schools give you till the end of the winter anyway to meet requirements so if whether or not you meet the minimum undergrad requirement at the beginning of the winter term or at the end of it does not really matter. Hope that helps.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/18/2017 at 1:22 AM, Super Nova said:

Whether or not it is included in the GPA is based on full time studies or not, rather than when you started. This is school dependent. Some schools calculate your GPA using courses that were taking when you were a full time student (which is at least 3 courses in a semester in most cases). So if you are taking at least this amount in the jan-april semester, then yes it would most likely be included in the GPA. You are confusing GPA calculation with minimum undergraduate education requirement. They are treated separately. If the school in question required 3 years of undergrad, than your jan-april semester would be 0.5 of a year (assuming you were full time to their standards). Of course they would combine it with the next semester, it does not just get forgotten thats for sure. But it wont really matter because Canadian schools give you till the end of the winter anyway to meet requirements so if whether or not you meet the minimum undergrad requirement at the beginning of the winter term or at the end of it does not really matter. Hope that helps.

Thank you SN for your detailed explanation! That makes sense! 

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Dentistry101 said:

Hey, regardless of what answer you get with this thread, I still advise you to email the admission committee of your dental school of interest to inquire about this. I doubt they won't consider a school semester, but obviously you must confirm with them.

Thank you Dentistry101 for your advise! Sounds great! I will confirm with them to be sure! 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...