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Nonacademic scores


Guest iownhonda

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Guest iownhonda

Do you guys know how hard it is to get 16/25 in the nonacademic part of the application? Provided that I get close to 25 in the academic part, I just want to do enough extracurricular work that will grant me an interview.

 

How much work do guys think is needed to get such a score?

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Guest GundamDX

that post could be a long read... :P

 

anyway i dont know, i dont want to sound mean but if you know ppl who have been rejected, go ask them what their scores are and what they did, and you'll get a pretty good idea.

 

From what i have heard about 2 years ago... someone with absolutely terrifyingly incredible ECs scored a 21 in one year then 18 in his next... strange, but true. My suggestion is do what you like and try to balance it out. the old questoin of "what should I do for ECS to get into med" probably sickens 9/10 of us by now, coz that's just wrong :D

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Guest jgray2

Q: is it possible to score a 25/25 on the NAQ score?

 

you'd better start training for the olympics now. only four more years left in order to get your gold medal in vancouver.

 

seriously, i think it is /possible/. whether anyone actually does is another question altogether.

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Guest kalenakai

or you can catch the Commonwealthgames which is now in Australia! lol.

 

its funny that you mention it, my close friend, swam in the olympics and now going to the commonwealthgames and he interviewed with us at UBC. wondering if he is the same person you know...

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Guest canstowski

i hope i don't offend anyone when i say applicants shouldn't be doing extracurricular work just for the sake of applying to med school. Hence you shouldn't be doing "just enough" extracurricular work to "grant" you an interview.

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Guest Paulchemguy

I agree that applicants shouldn't be doing EC PURELY for padding resume. Why not try to do some volunteer work that you would also enjoy and learn something from?

 

I also don't quite agree with "doing just enough EC" part of the question, unless he/she has some extremely special circumstances....

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Guest jgray2

one shouldn't volunteer for the sake of getting into med school. ubc knows this happens, knows how to identify this, and as such, will dock you on the "service ethics" component of your naq.

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they ask you during the interview. simple as that. they not be making it obvious with the questions they ask you, but they're analyzing your response when you talk.

 

Kupo

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Guest jgray2

for example:

 

your life starts here:

nothing

nothing

nothing

nothing

nothing

nothing

begin university

nothing

nothing

nothing

nothing

third year university

lots of things lots of things lots of things lots of things "eighty hours per week" of things

apply to medicine.

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Guest GundamDX

well I didn't start most of my ECs until 2nd year. I would say that yes, some people do do extra things in the year or two just b4 application to boost their application. But you can't dismiss the fact that there are some people who are not aware of the greatness of involvement till they are older OR they are just bookworms in their earlier years. I was in Scouts and Air Cadets for 1.5 years each. I didn't put them down coz they were grade 8 to 10 stuff. ALSO, I didn't get very far with neither activity. I was a bookworm till 2nd year when I started volunteering at a hospital for the first time and realized that interacting with patients can be that rewarding. I was a shy person before that, I mean, I was scared to order by myself at McDonalds in grade 12! My point is, some people mature later than others, hence they might be more involved in their later years in University.

 

Besides, I personally felt that by taking on ECs your grades will suffer. I was able to pull off good pre-reqs coz I wasn't involved in my first two years at UBC. Looking back, I don't think I can do it back then, to balance ECs and get good grades. .... it really depends on the individual.

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Guest RoseSmurfette

As kupo said, I think it really comes out in an interview (even perhaps the essay!) whether you really are passionate about the things you do. If you can't think of what you did in your activities, reasons why you enjoyed them, or what you learned from them, then you probably didn't put a lot of heart into them.

 

While EC's ARE important in getting into medical school, you should remember why med schools choose to include that in their criteria. They want to see that you've learned something from them - developed social, interpersonal, and other skills. Skills that will be important in life including the practice of medicine (and I'm assuming that if you want to go into med school you want to be the best physician you can be). I think if you try different EC's with the attitude that you want to learn something, perhaps contribute to society (if it's humanitarian work), and have fun, then you'll be fine.

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Guest canmic

I think some of you are missing an important point on the whole EC thing.

 

Suppose you had two students applying:

 

One of them has a 4.0 average but was a total bookworm during the school year and crammed in a couple of ECs in the summer before applying.

 

The other only had a 3.7 average but spent 20-30 hours per week on ECs.

 

True, the ECs hurt the gpa, but, which one is more likely to be able to handle the workload of medschool?

 

I honestly think that just about anyone who has the slightest chance of possibly graduating from med school EVER could pull a 4.0 gpa IF they had absolutely nothing else to worry about or do. If their parents paid for everything and they had no hobbies or volunteering or other ECs and just spent all their time studying for school.

 

But, does that make them better candidates than those who had other things going on and got slightly lower (but still good) grades?

 

I'd guess that it would be a very bad thing during an interview to say that you didn't do any ECs because you wanted to get high grades. If I was interviewing, my next question would be "Why couldn't you do both?" and I'm sure that's what the interviewers are asking themselves, given that they've seen students with both high grades and good ECs.

 

If you want your admission to be pretty much all about grades (and MCAT) try Manitoba or Dalhousie, they work that way.

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