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Android vs iPhone for Clerkship???


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This is of particular interest of me too. Could we keep reponses to specific answers with support? We all know iphone has more apps so its not very useful to just reiterate that

 

Also, is it possible to just get an ipod touch? Do the apps need data, and is there wifi at the hospital

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If I was currently getting a phone purely on the basis of the availability of apps, then yes I would get an iPhone. However, Android is catching up. Hopefully Medscape will update their Android app.

 

And just so I'm not making another apps post again :P I'm gonna argue my case for Android.

 

[Argument]Search Android in my posts and you'll see my reasons[/Argument]

 

And if you're too lazy for that, I'll try to give a short answer here. Bigger screen means less squinting when trying to read blocks of text or look at detailed pictures, which you may be doing on the wards. The ppi values between the iPhone 4S and the latest Androids are very similar, so that shouldn't be an issue.

 

Unless Apple changes their development strategy drastically I could see Android eventually being way better than Apple phones in terms of OS functionality. Apple seems to just try to sell users the same thing but slightly different, knowing consumers will go for it, while Android has (you could say copied Apple in the first place if you go for Steve Jobs' argument) made some changes that surpassed some of Apple's functions (which Apple then copied).

 

Google Maps has been around for a while, it's trusted and they do still keep updating it to make it better. Apple, in their continuation of Steve Jobs' thermonuclear war against Android, dropped this for some other program, and you can't be too sure how well it'll work (could be way better, could be way worse).

 

Arguments for Apple:

They're shiny and apparently look better than Android phones. No fragmentation, so you know all the latest apps will work for your latest model phone (until it gets outdated like all phones will). You're a med student so there's a 90% chance you bought a MBP, which means you can link your phone and computer and whatever else you have over iCloud pretty easily (I would assume anyways).

 

Other things to consider:

Do you want to be able to absolutely smash up your phone by dropping it on one side, or have the option of doing so with both sides?

Do you wear a lot of turtlenecks?

Are you possibly a cyborg or android yourself, possibly making you more compatible with Android phones (or maybe less compatible, who knows)?

Do you even like apples? If so, what kind? (I prefer gala myself)

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Well said Phoenix. I prefer android myself for many of the reasons stated above. I'm also a techie though and have built my own computers since I was a teen... so, like many others that are technologically inclined, I'm inherently biased against apple products and their exorbitant markups on inferior technology (from a hardware perspective).

 

I do own an ipod touch though (first gen, was a gift), its great for music and as a toy -angry birds has saved me while waiting in the airport for a few hours.

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I wouldn't consider the amount of apps available as much of a factor to base my decision on. Pretty much all the big apps you can find on both android and ios.

 

Personally I found the iphone to be way too small for me after playing with a friends android, so visit a mobile store and play around with different phones then make your decision.

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Thanks for the advice so far guys. I just saw and played with an android phone today and considered getting one. I currently have an iPhone 3GS which I was considering upgrading to a 4G (or 5G if it comes out). I know the App store has more variety. Since I'm not yet in clerkship I don't know what apps are useful and which are not. For example, I assume apps that allow you to quickly look up meds or lab values would be useful. So, I wanted to know if the quality of clerkship friendly apps are the same between the two phones. If so, I will be highly swayed to go for the android.

I agree though, that things like user interface and the hardware itself is just personal preference.

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Thanks for the advice so far guys. I just saw and played with an android phone today and considered getting one. I currently have an iPhone 3GS which I was considering upgrading to a 4G (or 5G if it comes out). I know the App store has more variety. Since I'm not yet in clerkship I don't know what apps are useful and which are not. For example, I assume apps that allow you to quickly look up meds or lab values would be useful. So, I wanted to know if the quality of clerkship friendly apps are the same between the two phones. If so, I will be highly swayed to go for the android.

I agree though, that things like user interface and the hardware itself is just personal preference.

 

kmoh, this is what I was reading the other day: http://www.imedicalapps.com/2011/01/top-free-android-medical-apps-healthcare-professionals/

 

Check it out. I obviously haven't use any of these myself but perhaps someone who has can comment on their usefulness.

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kmoh, this is what I was reading the other day: http://www.imedicalapps.com/2011/01/top-free-android-medical-apps-healthcare-professionals/

 

Check it out. I obviously haven't use any of these myself but perhaps someone who has can comment on their usefulness.

 

Medscape only works on older versions of Android, not 4.0 or higher so far. Epocrates seems ok. I haven't looked at the other ones a lot.

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I'm biased because I have an Android, but honestly switching from Windows (what was I thinking?) to an Android smartphone was probably the best technology-related decision for my life /melodrama

 

Android

- Are better-looking phones than the iPhone, with bigger screens. Battery life is probably the main concern, which goes along with the bigger screens. But any Android phone should be able to get you through a day with a full charge to begin the day.

- There is so much customization potential. You can flash a new ROM whenever you want, which basically transforms your phone to a whole new way of operating. Meanwhile iPhone users are all using the same thing...boring! Within each ROM, you can have different lockscreens, different launchers (ways of running the phone and the apps), and different themes. I completely changed my phone around last month and it honestly is like getting a new phone!

- The ability to have access to your system files (if you root your phone) is extremely convenient

- The app market (Google PlayStore) is stocked with pretty much all the main apps that iPhone has, plus so much more. The iPhone market being "bigger" than Android is probably the worst reason for people to stick with the iPhone.

- If you are....ahem....industrious you can figure out ways of accessing many medical apps for.....ahem.....low cost

 

Honestly, I think most people have iPhones because of the hype, and because they just aren't familiar with Android. I was the same until I toyed around with my friends' Desire HD and decided to make the plunge into Android. I'm so glad I made that decision!

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