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How To Avoid Being Sued For The Sound Of Your Voice


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In a 2002 study of doctors that had been sued for malpractice, it was found that just by listening to their voices, Stanford University students were able to deduce who were the ones that had been brought to court. It was simply based on the dominant hostile tone of those who had been sued versus the group that “sounded warmer.” In other words, a lot can be heard through the tone of one’s voice.

 

Forbes‘ Carol Kinsey Goman uses this example when she coaches business leaders. Whenever a speaker addresses an audience, it’s not just about language but the tone and how one conveys their words to the listeners. Says Goman:

 

“The effect of paralinguistic communication is so potent that it can make bad news actually sound palatable or, conversely, take all the joy out of a positive message. I’ve seen managers give unflattering feedback while still exhibiting warm feelings through their tone of voice – and those who were being critiqued still felt positively about the overall interaction. I’ve also seen managers offer words of praise and appreciation in such a flat tone of voice that none of the recipients felt genuinely acknowledged or appreciated.”

 

 

http://www.stanford.edu/group/ipc/pubs/2002AmbadySurgery.pdf

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this is old stuff, communication style affects perceptions of blame, it's not just sound too, it's structural variation, body language, patient inclusivity… tone emphasizes empathy… you don't want to sue someone you perceive is sharing your grief, who believes in you, and who wants to fight with you… it's a form of emotional self disclosure, which builds trust… i could go on… mirroring can be an effective body language approach, eye contact if the person is hopeful, with open eyes that don't pierce… you'd be surprised at how complex it can get… and how you first learn to fake ton body language, but then feel wut the other person is feeling so you automatize it.

 

In a 2002 study of doctors that had been sued for malpractice, it was found that just by listening to their voices, Stanford University students were able to deduce who were the ones that had been brought to court. It was simply based on the dominant hostile tone of those who had been sued versus the group that “sounded warmer.” In other words, a lot can be heard through the tone of one’s voice.

 

Forbes‘ Carol Kinsey Goman uses this example when she coaches business leaders. Whenever a speaker addresses an audience, it’s not just about language but the tone and how one conveys their words to the listeners. Says Goman:

 

“The effect of paralinguistic communication is so potent that it can make bad news actually sound palatable or, conversely, take all the joy out of a positive message. I’ve seen managers give unflattering feedback while still exhibiting warm feelings through their tone of voice – and those who were being critiqued still felt positively about the overall interaction. I’ve also seen managers offer words of praise and appreciation in such a flat tone of voice that none of the recipients felt genuinely acknowledged or appreciated.”

 

 

http://www.stanford.edu/group/ipc/pubs/2002AmbadySurgery.pdf

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