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moving to alberta to gain IP, competitiveness?


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i hope it's okay if I also post the same message at the university of calgary forum. i would like to get as much input as possible.

 

Hey guys, i wanted some input regarding my level of competitiveness at both calgary and alberta. I understand the admissions process has changed over the past 2 years. i remember one of calgary or alberta would look at the best 2 years for the GPA, and the VR wasn't worth as much as it is now. i beleive the mcat was scored based on 15 in the past.

 

i'm also wondering if anyone can speculate on the amount of changes they would have for the next upcoming admissions cycle. would the same requirements to gain IP status be the same? i ask this because i plan to move to alberta, after being rejected this year at mcgill. i've been looking into pursuing a masters degree, which hopefully i can graduate in a year.

 

here are my stats. I am currently OOP.

 

I've completed 2 undergrads.

first one cGPA: 3.52

second one cGPA: 3.94

cGPA of both undergrads is just ~3.69.

MCAT: 11/10/8 R (PS/BS/VR/WS).

ECs/Volunteering: sports, research, TA, hospital...

 

i assume rewriting the mcat for the third time might be something to consider? but can i even be competitive at the moment?

 

I've seen the stats on this site for those who have gotten interviews or whom have been rejected. some of the stats are very impressive and i'm hoping aren't representative of everyone who gets in. i would appreciate any help.

 

thanks so much

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i hope it's okay if I also post the same message at the university of calgary forum. i would like to get as much input as possible.

 

Hey guys, i wanted some input regarding my level of competitiveness at both calgary and alberta. I understand the admissions process has changed over the past 2 years. i remember one of calgary or alberta would look at the best 2 years for the GPA, and the VR wasn't worth as much as it is now. i beleive the mcat was scored based on 15 in the past.

 

i'm also wondering if anyone can speculate on the amount of changes they would have for the next upcoming admissions cycle. would the same requirements to gain IP status be the same? i ask this because i plan to move to alberta, after being rejected this year at mcgill. i've been looking into pursuing a masters degree, which hopefully i can graduate in a year.

 

here are my stats. I am currently OOP.

 

I've completed 2 undergrads.

first one cGPA: 3.52

second one cGPA: 3.94

cGPA of both undergrads is just ~3.69.

MCAT: 11/10/8 R (PS/BS/VR/WS).

ECs/Volunteering: sports, research, TA, hospital...

 

i assume rewriting the mcat for the third time might be something to consider? but can i even be competitive at the moment?

 

I've seen the stats on this site for those who have gotten interviews or whom have been rejected. some of the stats are very impressive and i'm hoping aren't representative of everyone who gets in. i would appreciate any help.

 

thanks so much

 

Hi,

 

UofA's GPA calculation is as follows: if you have completed four or more years of undergrad (which you have), they will drop your lowest single year as long as it's not your most recent year. So no, UofA will not take your best two years GPA (to my knowledge, London and Queen's do this).

 

You'd have to calculate your UofA cGPA dropping your lowest year for all undergrad years combined.

 

Your cMCAT score (29R) is on the lower end for IP admission, but definitely not terrible. If you can re-write it (and particularly improve VR), many more options can open up.

 

I'm hesitant to advise you to move provinces for IP status unless you are dead sure that: a) you've explored all other alternatives that wouldn't require a move (a strong MCAT re-write + refining your ECs might increases your odds at Queen's or Western), B) your cGPA and MCAT are in the ballpark for UofA/UofC IP students, c) you are sure you have good ECs.

 

It's better to be safe than sorry when it comes to moving provinces for med school admission. To realistically assess your chances as an IP applicant, we would need more information about your cGPA and ECs.

 

Regarding the Master's, it won't really give you a solid advantage at IP admissions at UofA unless you have completed it (and that gives you 1 point) or miraculously pump out a publication very quickly. Perhaps my fellow classmate skp1187 can comment on this further :P

 

Best of Luck!

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I read somewhere that U of A GPA calculation is slightly different compared to other schools? that OMSAS GPA criteria does not apply and they calculate in their own way considering courses taken and etc.

My cGPA is pretty low... and I have 30 balanced MCAT.

 

Would I have a chance?

 

I'm planning to apply as IP next year.

 

Thank you

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i've written the mcat in 2008 (27R with a 7 on VR) and in 2009 (29R, 8 on VR). i'm not sure how much more i can get in terms of my VR score which has had me worried about western and queens. i plan to re-write this summer, maybe i can squeeze in 2 tries just in case. hopefully i can improve my VR score to a 9 at least and slightly over a 30 mcat. i suppose this could at the same time improve my odds at a US school. although writing the mcat so many times, i'm assuming would be a worry for adcoms especially in the states?

 

Yea, see how the MCAT re-write turns out. For Alberta IP, you're certainly cutting it close with a 29R. I can't comment on how writing multiple times would affect application to american schools - try checking the PM101 threads dedicated to this.

 

my cGPA with one year dropped would be a 3.76, not that much of an improvement.

 

That is what it is. With 3.76 + 30ish MCAT, I imagine you will likely need a stellar set of ECs to have a strong shot at landing interview. Some IPs with those academic stats do land interviews, but I don't know how strong their ECs were.

 

as for my ECs i have been TA for an undergrad class, have worked in 3 research labs while getting one publication as a co-author. played a variety of sports mostly at the recreational, intramural level, and once "varsity", as well as coaching. participated in student society, and hospital volunteering for a summer. i suppose more of the usual stuff.

 

Your ECs sound good. However, no one except those sitting on the adcom truly know what the standards are for "good" ECs. Have a look at the UofA admissions website to get an idea of how ECs are assessed (there are 6 categories, for instance).

 

Hope that gives you a better idea - however, keep in mind that its is tough to pinpoint exactly what your "chances" would be as an IP. A solid showing at the MCAT + keeping up a good range of ECs would give you a good shot. Again though, while we can speculate on this forum, take my words with a grain of salt especially regarding admissions chances. The process is unpredictable.

 

Good Luck!

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I read somewhere that U of A GPA calculation is slightly different compared to other schools? that OMSAS GPA criteria does not apply and they calculate in their own way considering courses taken and etc.

My cGPA is pretty low... and I have 30 balanced MCAT.

 

Would I have a chance?

 

I'm planning to apply as IP next year.

 

Thank you

 

Could you please be more specific

 

If you have a GPA >3.7 and a 30+ MCAT you will have a good shot at getting an interview as an IP applicant.

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Hi SharkLvr, Sincerely appreciate the reply.

 

i've written the mcat in 2008 (27R with a 7 on VR) and in 2009 (29R, 8 on VR). i'm not sure how much more i can get in terms of my VR score which has had me worried about western and queens. i plan to re-write this summer, maybe i can squeeze in 2 tries just in case. hopefully i can improve my VR score to a 9 at least and slightly over a 30 mcat. i suppose this could at the same time improve my odds at a US school. although writing the mcat so many times, i'm assuming would be a worry for adcoms especially in the states?

 

my cGPA with one year dropped would be a 3.76, not that much of an improvement.

 

as for my ECs i have been TA for an undergrad class, have worked in 3 research labs while getting one publication as a co-author. played a variety of sports mostly at the recreational, intramural level, and once "varsity", as well as coaching. participated in student society, and hospital volunteering for a summer. i suppose more of the usual stuff.

 

maybe this could provide you with a better overview?

 

once again thanks for taking the time. any other advice or thoughts would also be very much appreciated. :)

 

Hi Montrealer,

 

With a cGPA of 3.76 and good ECs, I think you have a good shot of getting an interview as an IP applicant. Your MCAT score is definitely below average (I think the average MCAT score for those who interview is around 32Q) so I would rewrite this summer and aim for a 30+ score. U of A does not care how many times you write the test.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I remember reading somewhere (a school official document) that each Canadian/Perm. Resident applicant must claim the SAME province of residence in all of the applications to medical schools.

 

If this rule were strictly enforced, moving to Alberta (hence claiming AB residence) will make you lose your Quebec privilege; this is really a tough choice.

 

Your cGPA, especially the second degree one, is great, and I really think it can make the cut off of any of the four Quebec medical schools. Given that you went to CEGEP, I assume it will not be too hard for you to catch up your French again and apply to the three French medical schools.

 

I think the chance of getting in as a QC resident is better than an AB one, although AB has the best success rate among Anglophone provinces. Try to work on French and apply to the three French schools, and I think that will be a better way to improve your chance.

 

I understand that French schools sometimes reserve 80% of their seats for CEGEP direct entry students, which you can do nothing about anyhow. Don't be scared away by the huge applicants number of each French school, despite they have so many applicants, many of them, as far as I understand, only apply because it is so easy to file an application (no long essays, references, etc), and getting into medicine, optometry, vet. med., pharmacy etc, for them, will be a better thing than struggling in any graduate programmes. As a veteran and someone who has plan to go into medicine since a long time ago, you should be in a much better position than many of those applicants.

 

Good luck!

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I remember reading somewhere (a school official document) that each Canadian/Perm. Resident applicant must claim the SAME province of residence in all of the applications to medical schools.

 

If this rule were strictly enforced, moving to Alberta (hence claiming AB residence) will make you lose your Quebec privilege; this is really a tough choice.

 

Your cGPA, especially the second degree one, is great, and I really think it can make the cut off of any of the four Quebec medical schools. Given that you went to CEGEP, I assume it will not be too hard for you to catch up your French again and apply to the three French medical schools.

 

I think the chance of getting in as a QC resident is better than an AB one, although AB has the best success rate among Anglophone provinces. Try to work on French and apply to the three French schools, and I think that will be a better way to improve your chance.

 

I understand that French schools sometimes reserve 80% of their seats for CEGEP direct entry students, which you can do nothing about anyhow. Don't be scared away by the huge applicants number of each French school, despite they have so many applicants, many of them, as far as I understand, only apply because it is so easy to file an application (no long essays, references, etc), and getting into medicine, optometry, vet. med., pharmacy etc, for them, will be a better thing than struggling in any graduate programmes. As a veteran and someone who has plan to go into medicine since a long time ago, you should be in a much better position than many of those applicants.

 

Good luck!

 

This may be true for some provinces, but I do know that Quebec/Alberta dual IP is technically possible.

 

Here's an example: By living in Alberta for the stated time period as a non-full time student, you get Alberta IP status. However, if you were born in Quebec, you will always be considered an IP for Quebec admissions (as long as the school sees your Quebec birth certificate and you fill in the paperwork, you're good).

 

A similar thing happened to me when I was applying last year. I was considered a Quebec IP, but also an Ontario IP (for McMaster admissions) since I attended high school in Ontario.

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This may be true for some provinces, but I do know that Quebec/Alberta dual IP is technically possible.

 

Here's an example: By living in Alberta for the stated time period as a non-full time student, you get Alberta IP status. However, if you were born in Quebec, you will always be considered an IP for Quebec admissions (as long as the school sees your Quebec birth certificate and you fill in the paperwork, you're good).

 

A similar thing happened to me when I was applying last year. I was considered a Quebec IP, but also an Ontario IP (for McMaster admissions) since I attended high school in Ontario.

 

Its true that you can meet the requirements to be IP in two provinces at the same time... However, I believe that Canadian medical schools work on the honor system, and expect you to claim IP in one province only. I assume this is to try and level the playing field, although I doubt it has much effect.

 

I'd imagine that if (I have no idea if this is true) schools were to cross-reference residency status, they would do so once they had decided on who they wanted to admit. I think this could be monitored similar to the fact that you cannot hold two seats at Canadian medical schools at the same time; accepting a second offer consequently declines the first.

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Its true that you can meet the requirements to be IP in two provinces at the same time... However, I believe that Canadian medical schools work on the honor system, and expect you to claim IP in one province only. I assume this is to try and level the playing field, although I doubt it has much effect.

 

I'd imagine that if (I have no idea if this is true) schools were to cross-reference residency status, they would do so once they had decided on who they wanted to admit. I think this could be monitored similar to the fact that you cannot hold two seats at Canadian medical schools at the same time; accepting a second offer consequently declines the first.

 

The schools simply post their rules for IP status. If you meet them then you meet them. There is no set of hidden rules really :) So it is quite possible to meet IP status, or regional status at multiple schools. If you do then in a competitive environment it would be illogical not to take the opportunities available to you. Schools cannot back tract on any of their states rules and so if they don't actually say you cannot be IP in more than one place then you can.

 

You shouldn't hold multiple acceptance slots but the system isn't that connected overall yet. Only things like OMSAS enforce the rules with a common system. We aren't that organized yet :)

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