Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

The Cardio Thread


michael333

Recommended Posts

I'm actually a lurker, but I decided to post because I have an off-topic question.:)

 

I'm pretty slim and sort of athletic when it comes to sports. However after years of doing nothing through undergrad, I've completely lost all endurance I ever had. I get tired very quickly now.

Therefore I'm beginning to jumprope and run on a treadmill.

 

1. How long would it take for me to lose any endurance I build up?

2. Wouldn't at least some of it stay even after I stop running and jumproping?

3. Could one possibly gain weight after discontinuing running and jumproping (supposedly because they'll end up not decreasing quantity in their diet after the discontinuation?)

 

4. I don't understand how some people seem to always have awesome endurance and other people have to work for it. (Genetics is not the answer, there is something else; I don't know what)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm actually a lurker, but I decided to post because I have an off-topic question.:)

 

I'm pretty slim and sort of athletic when it comes to sports. However after years of doing nothing through undergrad, I've completely lost all endurance I ever had. I get tired very quickly now.

Therefore I'm beginning to jumprope and run on a treadmill.

 

1. How long would it take for me to lose any endurance I build up?

 

2 to 4 weeks generally

 

2. Wouldn't at least some of it stay even after I stop running and jumproping?

 

It depends. If you continue to stay active ie play a sport, it might stay. If you sit on a couch and eat chips, it will go.

3. Could one possibly gain weight after discontinuing running and jumproping (supposedly because they'll end up not decreasing quantity in their diet after the discontinuation?)

 

Yes, because if you dont burn off those calories then your body will have a postive surplus of calories and you will gain weight.

4. I don't understand how some people seem to always have awesome endurance and other people have to work for it. (Genetics is not the answer, there is something else; I don't know what)

 

Those people do something to stay active, for example if they play soccer, it is pretty much like doing a interval workout. I stopped running for a while and I am still better runner than most of my friends because I tend to play a lot of sports.

 

 

Also, if you are going to run, ditch the treadmill. Running outside and running on a treadmill are two different things.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 to 4 weeks generally

 

Where did you get this figure?

 

 

Those people do something to stay active, for example if they play soccer, it is pretty much like doing a interval workout. I stopped running for a while and I am still better runner than most of my friends because I tend to play a lot of sports.

 

No I mean there are people who just seem to naturally have much better endurance anytime, anyday than others. I'm sure you have to have met someone of this sort

 

Also, if you are going to run, ditch the treadmill. Running outside and running on a treadmill are two different things.

 

I hatee the treadmill. However I don't go outside because of the snow, ice and generally cold weather.

. .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm actually a lurker, but I decided to post because I have an off-topic question.:)

 

I'm pretty slim and sort of athletic when it comes to sports. However after years of doing nothing through undergrad, I've completely lost all endurance I ever had. I get tired very quickly now.

Therefore I'm beginning to jumprope and run on a treadmill.

 

1. How long would it take for me to lose any endurance I build up?

2. Wouldn't at least some of it stay even after I stop running and jumproping?

3. Could one possibly gain weight after discontinuing running and jumproping (supposedly because they'll end up not decreasing quantity in their diet after the discontinuation?)

 

4. I don't understand how some people seem to always have awesome endurance and other people have to work for it. (Genetics is not the answer, there is something else; I don't know what)

 

1. Speaking from experience, it's different between individuals. You really shouldn't worry about this. It's like asking, "If I eat five donuts a day how fast will I get fat?" You see, most people probably wouldn't ask that question unless they were planning to eat five donuts a day. Are you planning to skip lots of workouts? And if you're asking about the effect of ones you skipped in the past, who the **** cares? What's done is done. Get back in shape.

 

2. Tough question. I don't know. But there are documented cases of fit individuals getting very badly out of shape and then returning to their previous level of fitness faster than you would expect.

 

3. It's well known that lack of exercise will slow your metabolic rate; like the previous poster said, this will generally lead to weight gain (assuming you don't adjust your diet to compensate). I personally lose weight when I don't exercise because I simply don't get as hungry and eat as much (coupled with a naturally fast metabolism).

 

4. Genetics, age, and lifestyle (diet, day-to-day activity levels, exercise frequency, etc...) are the three biggest factors in an individual's fitness.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Treadmills are all right, just put some inclination. Of course running for real is better but sometimes it's just not possible.

 

I'd argue that it depends upon what you're running on. People that run 10 km a day on hard concrete or asphalt are morons.

 

*Runs and hides from the biomechanics people that are going to rebuke me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Genetics, age, eating habits are a big part as has been mentioned, genetics is actually the biggest factor I would say...also, logically, the better shape you are in the longer it will take to become "out of shape"

 

Go for a run for 20 min everyday, do some push ups/pull ups/sit ups...you could be done in less than an hour (which anyone can have time for) and it's sure as hell better than nothing

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been doing high intensity interval training (HIIT) for about six months now and I've been getting actual endurance gains when I go for a normal run at a pace of about 25 minutes for 5km. I've been doing HIIT indoors during the winter and I've been setting my intervals at 14 MPH (treadmills are in MPH at my gym) and a 6 MPH jog for my resting minute.

 

Several papers, especially by Tabata, have shown that HIIT is more effective than a low-intensity cardio regimen at increasing your resting metabolic rate, huge VO2 max gains and fatty acid oxidation. It's definitely gotten rid of the beer gut I gained from 2nd to 4th year of university.

 

Edit: Also, you spend a lot less time at the gym. Don't worry what the calorie counter says. You'll be drained after a 12 minute session.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try this:

 

1. do 20 fast burpees (the most horrible exercise invented by humankind)

2. run once around the track

3. jump up the stairs

 

repeat everything 3-5 times

 

You will most likely want to throw up by the beginning of the 2d round:D

 

That's okay though - your endurance improves every single time you feel that way.

;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We should begin a thread just for "workouts that make you puke".

 

Here's one of my personal "fave"

 

3x800m - 400m recovery

2x600m - 200m recovery

1x400m - 200m recovery

1x200m - 100m recovery

1x100m - 50m recovery

 

I'm usually done by the third 800m...then realize there's still many many more meters to go. :(

 

This one builds lactic acid threshold for middle distance runners. I guess if you want to go longer, you can do 1000m or mile repeats ;). Oh mile repeats.... usually 4xmile = *barf* for me

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am gonna try this!

We should begin a thread just for "workouts that make you puke".

 

Here's one of my personal "fave"

 

3x800m - 400m recovery

2x600m - 200m recovery

1x400m - 200m recovery

1x200m - 100m recovery

1x100m - 50m recovery

 

I'm usually done by the third 800m...then realize there's still many many more meters to go. :(

 

This one builds lactic acid threshold for middle distance runners. I guess if you want to go longer, you can do 1000m or mile repeats ;). Oh mile repeats.... usually 4xmile = *barf* for me

 

I think I'll pass on this one though... (what does it end up being...like 4 hours long???) :o

The original workout from hell, except that he did it for fun:

 

400m fast, 200m slow jog

repeat 90 times

 

Emil Zapotek

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do any of you intersperse your cardio workouts with flexibility and/or strength training?

 

This is my get-back-in-workout-shape workout:

 

Day 1 -

 

6-8x incline pushups with handles (incline to increase weight, feet up on surface like a chair or table, and handles to increase range of motion)

6-8x chinups, full range of motion (NO 1/2-chins or 3/4-chins!)

6-8x military presses

6-8x barbell rows

6-8x dips, weighted vest

6-8x lateral raises

1 minute break

2x repeat above

 

Day 2 -

 

6-8x deadlifts

8-10x jack-knives

6-8x squats

25 crunches

1-2 minute wall sits

2-3 minute planks

1 minute break

2x repeat above

 

Day 3 -

P90X Yoga workout: http://www.megavideo.com/?d=7A4YJFTO

 

Day 4 -

Rest

 

Day 5-

Start cycle over

 

The key is finding the correct weights so that by the last set your hitting failure within the chosen rep range. The cardiovascular fatigue prevents you from using heavy weights and therefore reduces risk of injury.

 

I like explode through positive movements and control negative movements (try a push up with this rhythm; 4 seconds down, 0.5 up). Also, I make a concerted effort to maintain correct form.

 

When I'm doing these routines I try to eat around 3000 calories and get in 150 or so grams of protein a day. Should be able to finish each workout under 25 minutes, except for the yoga.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, this thread really got derailed, haha.

 

It bewilders me as to why people will go through these insane workout routines--such as p90x or other daily hardcore multiple-hour routines--while knowing that they will simply not be able to keep doing them for any significantly long period (5, 10 years?).

 

And therefore when they stop, those beautiful toned muscles they have will deform and lose all aesthetic. In addition, not only will they lose the look, but more importantly the endurance and strength they've built up will also fade.

 

Why not do short workout routines that you can commit to daily/weekly for the next 10 or 20 years and be guaranteed a higher fitness and attractive aesthetic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, this thread really got derailed, haha.

 

It bewilders me as to why people will go through these insane workout routines--such as p90x or other daily hardcore multiple-hour routines--while knowing that they will simply not be able to keep doing them for any significantly long period (5, 10 years?).

 

And therefore when they stop, those beautiful toned muscles they have will deform and lose all aesthetic. In addition, not only will they lose the look, but more importantly the endurance and strength they've built up will also fade.

 

Why not do short workout routines that you can commit to daily/weekly for the next 10 or 20 years and be guaranteed a higher fitness and attractive aesthetic.

 

very true.

 

i think the philosophy on working out is changing from the "i need to do be at the gym for 2 hours doing cardio then lifting weights to specifically focus on my back and shoulders today, then tomorrow i'll do my legs and arms" to a "i want to get 30-60 minutes of solid physical activity in that challenges me and gives me functional fitness"... at least that's how i feel.

 

part of the problem is not eating healthy... if you can eat healthy and embrace a diet that is balanced and can be maintained over the course of several years you'll see that working out for hours on end is unecessary and you can maintain a healthy level of fitness for years on end.

 

plus some people just have better genes than others and respond differently to different levels of physical activity.

 

but i agree- you need to be real about what you can handle over a long period of time, maybe have short spurts where you increase your load or modify your diet short term to speed up your results and shift back to a maintenance workout/diet when you've hit your goal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, in terms of bone biomechanics, impact forces are not a concern. In fact, the active forces produced by your muscles are higher. Also, more impact = more bone remodelling = stronger bone, which is a good thing.

 

 

I'd argue that it depends upon what you're running on. People that run 10 km a day on hard concrete or asphalt are morons.

 

*Runs and hides from the biomechanics people that are going to rebuke me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes doing super extreme 2 hour workouts is more effort then needed...

But "resistance" in both traditional and modern sense has more long term benefits (except for endurance in traditional resistance workouts) for the things you're talking about. Working out "beautiful toned muscles" will raise your basal metabolism a lot more then going on runs. For the most part cardio only raises your metabolism during the activity. Also there was a recent report (I believe in the CMAJ or UBCmed... but don't quote me) talking about how resitance training in the very elderly showed huge improvements in life and health (even after they had stop the training).

 

My story gone short:

Was hockey player. Quit hockey for a while and ate unhealthy. Became overweight in highschool. Changed diet and begun working out (more traditional style resistant workouts with running) and lost the weight. Got busy with music, school and girls so couldnt' do the 4-5 2 hour workouts. Started getting out of shape again.

Now I do "whole body workouts." It's like weights and cardio combined (similar to what hking03 was talking about earlier). I do 30 mins maybe twice or three times a week and my diet is decent but no health freak for sure. I'm in best shape ever of my life and even if I'm out for a month it takes 2 weeks tops for me to get back in at full motor.

 

Moral of both: High intense full body will trump 2 hours of weights or long ridiculous cardio for all measures of health except for stamina with the cardio. This is not to knocked down running. I love running in the summer (aka when I have more time available).

 

 

Wow, this thread really got derailed, haha.

 

It bewilders me as to why people will go through these insane workout routines--such as p90x or other daily hardcore multiple-hour routines--while knowing that they will simply not be able to keep doing them for any significantly long period (5, 10 years?).

 

And therefore when they stop, those beautiful toned muscles they have will deform and lose all aesthetic. In addition, not only will they lose the look, but more importantly the endurance and strength they've built up will also fade.

 

Why not do short workout routines that you can commit to daily/weekly for the next 10 or 20 years and be guaranteed a higher fitness and attractive aesthetic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Who's Online   0 Members, 0 Anonymous, 55 Guests (See full list)

    • There are no registered users currently online
×
×
  • Create New...