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Average age? is 25 at the time of admittance generally on the older side?


q1w2e3

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I've read it is around 23, which would be pulled down a bit by Quebec where many start right out of CÉGEP at 19 or so.

 

I doubt you'll be an oddity at 25. If I get in on my first application cycle, I'll be 28 and I don't consider that terribly far out of the norm.

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I'm like you. I'm very worried about "losing time" or "losing a year." But if you've determined that medicine is really what you want to do in life, then keep your chin up :) "Don't give up on your dreams just because of the time it will take to achieve them. That time will pass anyways."

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I often find the age factor worrying..

 

There's an unhealthy preoccupation with age on this forum. Twenty-something is not old. If you go around telling people on the street that it is, they'll laugh at you. After a long career as a doctor, do you think it'll matter if you started at 22 or 25? No.

 

Certain groups of people may have reason to worry about age, but it doesn't sound like you're one of them.

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There's an unhealthy preoccupation with age on this forum. Twenty-something is not old. If you go around telling people on the street that it is, they'll laugh at you. After a long career as a doctor, do you think it'll matter if you started at 22 or 25? No.

 

Certain groups of people may have reason to worry about age, but it doesn't sound like you're one of them.

 

For some people, family contributes to the whole age thing. Parents can sometimes be obsessed with not losing time or falling behind.

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Twenty-something is not old. If you go around telling people on the street that it is, they'll laugh at you.

 

Age is all relative. If you want to feel younger, hang out with people who are older than you (so don't pick freshmen to ask on the street).

 

Plus, part of growing up is becoming comfortable in your own skin. If you have a few years on the rest, own your experiences and wisdom...

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For some people, family contributes to the whole age thing. Parents can sometimes be obsessed with not losing time or falling behind.

 

If that's their perspective, I would guess that they would find some other aspect to compare your life against others, even if age were not a factor. No benefit in adding to your own stress level by internalizing the self-talk. Easier said than done, I know, but try to focus on all the things that are going right for you and where you are headed. As time goes on, I realize how useless it truly is to worry about 'keeping up' with others. I don't know what your parents are like, but can you set an example of equinamity and over time, counter that worldview through repetition?

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If that's their perspective, I would guess that they would find some other aspect to compare your life against others, even if age were not a factor. No benefit in adding to your own stress level by internalizing the self-talk. Easier said than done, I know, but try to focus on all the things that are going right for you and where you are headed. As time goes on, I realize how useless it truly is to worry about 'keeping up' with others. I don't know what your parents are like, but can you set an example of equinamity and over time, counter that worldview through repetition?

 

I completely agree with you. After burning out and stressing through much of my university life, I broke down this summer, realizing that there was a solid chance that I wasn't going to get in on my first shot. My parents have always valued education highly and have emphasized career planning for themselves and us (me and my brother). But I was shocked to find that they were surprisingly supportive and understanding about the situation. They actually gave me some perspective, telling me the world wasn't going to shatter to a million pieces if all I got were "no's" the first time around. It's something I feel I have struggled with during my undergrad and I'm finally starting to understand people when they say time shouldn't be the deciding factor, especially in a field like medicine. It's been a big learning experience for me though I still hope to get in within what I'd consider to be a "reasonable" time.

 

It was just an observation on my part because I've felt the pressure of wanting to please my parents and I'm sure others have too. :)

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Yes, you want to please your parents, but if they love you, they likewise will care about your well-being (of which education/career is one part), and will not want to see you stressed to the point of burning out :) Success should not be achieved at the expense of health and happiness (and it wouldn't really be success in that case, would it?).

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I completely agree with you. After burning out and stressing through much of my university life, I broke down this summer, realizing that there was a solid chance that I wasn't going to get in on my first shot. My parents have always valued education highly and have emphasized career planning for themselves and us (me and my brother). But I was shocked to find that they were surprisingly supportive and understanding about the situation. They actually gave me some perspective, telling me the world wasn't going to shatter to a million pieces if all I got were "no's" the first time around. It's something I feel I have struggled with during my undergrad and I'm finally starting to understand people when they say time shouldn't be the deciding factor, especially in a field like medicine. It's been a big learning experience for me though I still hope to get in within what I'd consider to be a "reasonable" time.

 

It was just an observation on my part because I've felt the pressure of wanting to please my parents and I'm sure others have too. :)

 

My parents are not like that - they see life as a rush to get done. Go to high school, find the quickest way into an MD and start making money. That's life, nothing else. I had to fight with them my entire 12th grade to convince them to not send me off to the caribbean (they saw all those Xavier school of medicine commercials on indian channels..)

 

I was talking with my mom the other day about alternatives in case medicine doesn't pan out - like a physician assistant, path assistant (though I read to get that MSc you need an MD?... Which is weird cause the same is for a pathologist so why would an MD be an assistant if they could just be a full fledged pathologist...), public health management MScs, etc. She broke down and cried about how I am not smart enough to be a doctor and how I am just wasting time getting a degree when I could be halfway through an MD at an overseas school... Which obviously makes me feel like **** since my first two undergrad years are not up to snuff for medical schools, so I am going hardcore for the next two.

 

My grandparents on my mom's side, however, are insanely supportive like your parents. They say if I don't get it the first time around, I can rewrite my tests, do extra crap and try again next year. They are traditional indians too, but they seem to understand that being able to study medicine will take some time.

 

Honestly, if I don't get an MD I think my parents are just gonna tell me to off myself or something.

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My parents are not like that - they see life as a rush to get done. Go to high school, find the quickest way into an MD and start making money. That's life, nothing else. I had to fight with them my entire 12th grade to convince them to not send me off to the caribbean (they saw all those Xavier school of medicine commercials on indian channels..)

 

I was talking with my mom the other day about alternatives in case medicine doesn't pan out - like a physician assistant, path assistant (though I read to get that MSc you need an MD?... Which is weird cause the same is for a pathologist so why would an MD be an assistant if they could just be a full fledged pathologist...), public health management MScs, etc. She broke down and cried about how I am not smart enough to be a doctor and how I am just wasting time getting a degree when I could be halfway through an MD at an overseas school... Which obviously makes me feel like **** since my first two undergrad years are not up to snuff for medical schools, so I am going hardcore for the next two.

 

My grandparents on my mom's side, however, are insanely supportive like your parents. They say if I don't get it the first time around, I can rewrite my tests, do extra crap and try again next year. They are traditional indians too, but they seem to understand that being able to study medicine will take some time.

 

Honestly, if I don't get an MD I think my parents are just gonna tell me to off myself or something.

 

I'm really really sorry to hear that. My parents would definitely prefer that I get in right away, especially given that some of my cousins and family friends have gotten in right away so it's like I have a bar to meet. But it's nice to know they'd support me through it.

 

I don't know exactly what your parents are like or how much they know about this process but medical school admission in Canada is one of the toughest in the world I believe. Maybe you could educate them about the process and about why spending a couple of extra years to get a Canadian MD may be a better option than going overseas and getting an MD from a "lesser" school that you may not be as proud of.

 

I know its tough. Believe me, I know. But my dad always says that there are multiple paths to any goal in life. You have to determine the path that is right for you, not necessarily the one that is the easiest to take. And please do not do anything extreme if you don't get into medicine right away. "Offing yourself" is a permanent solution to a temporary problem and you shouldn't even let the thought cross your mind. Keep your grandparents close, they have years and years of life experience (even more than your parents ;)). Stay strong and find support in any way possible, beginning with some of the extremely heart-warming stories on this forum.

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My grandparents on my mom's side, however, are insanely supportive like your parents. They say if I don't get it the first time around, I can rewrite my tests, do extra crap and try again next year. They are traditional indians too, but they seem to understand that being able to study medicine will take some time.

Can they intercede on your behalf, to the effect that this pressure and focus on the short-term (off-shore schools) is actually counterproductive to your success?

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I'm really really sorry to hear that. My parents would definitely prefer that I get in right away, especially given that some of my cousins and family friends have gotten in right away so it's like I have a bar to meet. But it's nice to know they'd support me through it.

 

I don't know exactly what your parents are like or how much they know about this process but medical school admission in Canada is one of the toughest in the world I believe. Maybe you could educate them about the process and about why spending a couple of extra years to get a Canadian MD may be a better option than going overseas and getting an MD from a "lesser" school that you may not be as proud of.

 

I know its tough. Believe me, I know. But my dad always says that there are multiple paths to any goal in life. You have to determine the path that is right for you, not necessarily the one that is the easiest to take. And please do not do anything extreme if you don't get into medicine right away. "Offing yourself" is a permanent solution to a temporary problem and you shouldn't even let the thought cross your mind. Keep your grandparents close, they have years and years of life experience (even more than your parents ;)). Stay strong and find support in any way possible, beginning with some of the extremely heart-warming stories on this forum.

 

Oh man I have - I asked about doing a 5th year just to help my GPA and they got pissy wissy on me. My mom's plan was for me to go to the Caribbean and somehow get residency in the Toronto general (I don't even....)

 

For them, it's about the money and prestige it brings to the family. They never really told me about how I should be a doctor cause I have the personality for it, cause I have the potential and the type of mindset and people skills that a doctor needs - it's about the 100K a year and the prestige it brings to the family. Big woop.

 

Oh man this forum - I read a lot of great stories here, but I can easily become even more discouraged then I was coming in half the time, so many stories of those with 3.8s worried about how they won't get in, and right now I am sitting with a 2yr GPA of 3.15! Sometimes I get a "give up on yourself, cause you're a failure, LFO" vibe when I read all the 4.0 keener stories... I know it's hellah hard to get in medical school here, and even harder for me since I have to make up for those two bum years - but man it's like I don't even have a chance when I come and read the stories here.

 

Which is why I feel like a failure. Been depressed this entire summer :(

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What is up with all your parents?!

 

I don't know anybody who was seriously pressured into medicine. I always kind of figured that was one of those things parents said when their kids are little. The process is so difficult I can't imagine anybody committing to it just to impress their parents.

 

That sucks though.

 

I have seen it - not that the person may also want to go to med school, at least to a degree, but the parent pressure was incredibly strong. It was clear they wanted it more than the student.

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I decided on medicine by myself, although a strong motivating influence has been a lady I grew to love whom I helped out as she was wheelchair bound, a failed double organ transplant, and on dialysis. I treasure the memory of this blessed lady who died far too young and I want to help save the lives of persons like her.

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I know it's hellah hard to get in medical school here, and even harder for me since I have to make up for those two bum years - but man it's like I don't even have a chance when I come and read the stories here.

 

Which is why I feel like a failure. Been depressed this entire summer :(

 

Keep in mind that forums like this tend to attract certain groups of people (which includes overachievers); the average medical school applicant doesn't come here. Also remember that for every person who posts with good stats, there are 10 others with lower stats who don't. I'd say you're in the majority. You still have two years left, so you can improve, but definitely consider backup plans and other career options too, even if people don't agree. This goes a long way towards peace of mind.

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What these parents are doing to their children is a form of child abuse.

 

except none of them are children. From a more traditional western culture perspective it seems crazy - just tell you parents what you are doing and why, and their protests are not as important as living your life - but of course that is a very specific cultural bias.

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Keep in mind that forums like this tend to attract certain groups of people (which includes overachievers); the average medical school applicant doesn't come here. Also remember that for every person who posts with good stats, there are 10 others with lower stats who don't. I'd say you're in the majority. You still have two years left, so you can improve, but definitely consider backup plans and other career options too. This goes a long way towards peace of mind.

 

as you say likely the average ones doesn't post - there are probably a few major groups of posters - those that are doing very well and just want confirmation of that, people that are desperate enough to post with bad stats because their fear of failure overwhelms their fear of virtual social rejection, and of course people very interested in learning how the system works or more about health care and answering questions/commenting is a good way to do that.

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as you say likely the average ones doesn't post - there are probably a few major groups of posters - those that are doing very well and just want confirmation of that, people that are desperate enough to post with bad stats because their fear of failure overwhelms their fear of virtual social rejection, and of course people very interested in learning how the system works or more about health care and answering questions/commenting is a good way to do that.

 

Couldn't have put it better myself.

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Keep in mind that forums like this tend to attract certain groups of people (which includes overachievers); the average medical school applicant doesn't come here. Also remember that for every person who posts with good stats, there are 10 others with lower stats who don't. I'd say you're in the majority. You still have two years left, so you can improve, but definitely consider backup plans and other career options too, even if people don't agree. This goes a long way towards peace of mind.

 

I've read this multiple times on this forum. That these forums primarily attract overachievers but somehow that always surprises me. All you have to do is type "premed" into a Google search and PM101 is the first link that pops up. I find it hard to believe that anyone even remotely considering medicine wouldn't have found and used this forum? Is it really true that the average medical school applicant doesn't come here?

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