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Why I faked being black for med school


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https://www.queensu.ca/gazette/stories/queen-s-university-moves-right-historic-wrong
 

A century after banning admission of Black students to its medical school, Queen’s University has extended a formal letter of apology acknowledging the institution’s past racist actions and repeated failures to hold itself accountable. In an official ceremony, Principal and Vice-Chancellor Daniel Woolf and Dean of Health Sciences Richard Reznick signed the letter and expressed profound regret on behalf of the institution for injustices enacted upon its Black medical students, alumni, and prospective applicants.

“We are resolved to confront our past actions, and to more fully understand the meaning of the university’s historical racism, including a commitment to identify its causes and consequences to the best of our ability,” reads the formal apology issued by Principal Woolf and Dean Reznick. “In reckoning with our institutional history, we are committed to acknowledging our failures and to learning from our mistakes. It is our sincere desire to confront this past, learn from it, and never again repeat it.”

In 1918, the Senate of Queen’s University voted to support a motion prohibiting students of African descent from attending its medical school, at the request of the Faculty of Medicine – a ban that went enforced until 1965. According to recent research by Queen’s PhD candidate, Edward Thomas, the ban was put in place to demonstrate alignment with discriminatory policies favoured at the time by the American Medical Association, the organization that ranked medical schools in North America.

Even after 1965, archival evidence suggests the historical facts of the ban were misrepresented by the university when confronted with the issue in 1978, 1986, and 1988. In 2018, once Mr. Thomas presented his research findings to the current Queen’s Senate and brought to light the motion’s continued existence, the university formally rescinded the resolution that enabled the ban.

“As an institution, we can never undo the harm that we caused to generations of Black students, and we have to accept that our actions contributed to the inequities in the medical profession that still exist today,” wrote Dr. Reznick in a blog post published in advance of the ceremony. “I hope, though, that our actions will continue to move the School of Medicine in the direction of greater inclusivity, diversity, and equity.”
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On 4/21/2019 at 10:45 PM, ysera said:

wow wtf...

yeah....it isn't like Canada is immune to this sort of crap. That isn't all that long ago academically speaking. Seems amazing now in hindsight that they did it but I suppose at least in a way that is some form of progress. Not that we don't still have biases in the system to contend with. 

 

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