Jump to content
Premed 101 Forums

Psychiatry Residency Programs Canada - Comparison


PinkFreud
 Share

Recommended Posts

I think try to write down what things you liked and disliked about each one you interviewed at, compare what their off-service rotations are, their unique rotations and offerings are and figure out what appeals the most to you, as well as integrating in the value of location for you. A ROL is highly personal and pros to one person could be cons to another! It depends a lot on what you are looking for in a program and what your career goals are.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can try to help, with the caveat that my cons might be someone else's pros and vice versa.

UBC

  • Pros: Great for research, niche specialties, bigger centers, addictions, BC is pretty, multiple sites
  • Cons: bigger program (not sure about much else,  didnt apply here)

Alberta: dont know much about

Calgary

  • Pros: tight knit program, solid child & adolescent (able to do more blocks in it if you're interested in doing a fellowship after), alberta is pretty
  • Cons: 4 blocks of internal med, Alberta's healthcare system is kinda rekt rn 

Sask: dunno much about

Manitoba

  • Pros: tight knit group, solid CL Psych (6 months in 4th year, most schools only do 3) and big on addictions, great rural psych opportunities (get to go to nunavut), psychotherapy is decent, protected academic days
  • Cons: lots of healthcare disparities within the population, Winnipeg isn't the greatest for getting around on transit, its cold af 

NOSM: dunno much about

Western

  • Pros: great for psychopharmacology, Dr. Javeed Sukhera's there and is a huge advocate for SDOH 
  • Cons: Program's on probation 

Mac

  • Pros: 2 sites, tight knit program, do have some access to more niche specialties, decent forensics, decent psychotherapy, close to Toronna if you're a city rat, protected academic half days
  • Cons: I find the program is a bit overboard with supervision (but this could be a pro in that there's a lot of support and supervision in the beginning), the call is brutal (volume wise), their psych emerg has been a long-standing issue but it looks like they've been approved to expand it as the current space is ..well, bad lol.

Toronto

  • Pros: niche specialties, solid psychotherapy, research ++, robust, biggest pro here is the exposure you'll get I'd say, and Toronto's a cool city 
  • Cons: lottery for which hospital site you end up at, there's 'collegiality' among residents but not the same vibe that you'd get at programs with < 10 residents per year. It's just too big for that. They don't do socials etc. No yearly book fund, no formal academic half days

Queen's

  • Pros: small/tight knit program, research opportunities especially in ketamine use, really good for work-life balance, the program's very accommodating and the PD has your back, they have a great geri psych program i'd say, home call!!, Kingston's on the water
  • Cons: Child & adolescent exposure is lacking, high turnover rate on their acute psych floor, just lower volumes overall; psychotherapy is okay but you have to seek out opportunities if you want more niche subtypes

Ottawa

  • Pros: tight knit but still big enough center, good research opportunities, really solid child/adolescent and psychotherapy, probably the lead in health policy and really good in forensics, cool city 
  • Cons: were on probation recently but have fought well to make a comeback, the call can be busy, I think they're just adapting to CBD and haven't really updated their website yet.., bigger emphasis on independence it seems

McGill

  • Pros: from what I've heard tight knit group, incredible psychotherapy / transcultural psychiatry program, Montreal is amazing, idk much else about the program tbh

Dunno the rest of the french schools

Dalhousie

  • Pros: seem like a close group, ++ focus on work-life balance, protected academic half-days, good rural psych exposure, PGY-4 selective opportunity in additional psychotherapy modalities, coastal cities are pretty, lots of supervision (good or bad depending)
  • Cons: 10% of your training has to be outside of halifax, only 2 months of CL in PGY-4, i'm not sure what their research opportunities are like

Memorial

  • Pros: very kind and tight knit group, early on exposure to emerg psych and opportunity to do mobile crisis block in PGY1, can help neurosurgery at a locum, beautiful coast, exposure to ECT training (usually dont get this in other centers), great for rural 
  • Cons: not known for research, psychotherapy was lacking but has improved in recent years apparently, more so geared towards training in general psychiatry vs niche.  

Anyway hope this helps. And again, this is my perspective and other people may have different views / experiences that I don't know about! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, sykern said:

I can try to help, with the caveat that my cons might be someone else's pros and vice versa.

UBC

  • Pros: Great for research, niche specialties, bigger centers, addictions, BC is pretty, multiple sites
  • Cons: bigger program (not sure about much else,  didnt apply here)

Alberta: dont know much about

Calgary

  • Pros: tight knit program, solid child & adolescent (able to do more blocks in it if you're interested in doing a fellowship after), alberta is pretty
  • Cons: 4 blocks of internal med, Alberta's healthcare system is kinda rekt rn 

Sask: dunno much about

Manitoba

  • Pros: tight knit group, solid CL Psych (6 months in 4th year, most schools only do 3) and big on addictions, great rural psych opportunities (get to go to nunavut), psychotherapy is decent, protected academic days
  • Cons: lots of healthcare disparities within the population, Winnipeg isn't the greatest for getting around on transit, its cold af 

NOSM: dunno much about

Western

  • Pros: great for psychopharmacology, Dr. Javeed Sukhera's there and is a huge advocate for SDOH 
  • Cons: Program's on probation 

Mac

  • Pros: 2 sites, tight knit program, do have some access to more niche specialties, decent forensics, decent psychotherapy, close to Toronna if you're a city rat, protected academic half days
  • Cons: I find the program is a bit overboard with supervision (but this could be a pro in that there's a lot of support and supervision in the beginning), the call is brutal (volume wise), their psych emerg has been a long-standing issue but it looks like they've been approved to expand it as the current space is ..well, bad lol.

Toronto

  • Pros: niche specialties, solid psychotherapy, research ++, robust, biggest pro here is the exposure you'll get I'd say, and Toronto's a cool city 
  • Cons: lottery for which hospital site you end up at, there's 'collegiality' among residents but not the same vibe that you'd get at programs with < 10 residents per year. It's just too big for that. They don't do socials etc. No yearly book fund, no formal academic half days

Queen's

  • Pros: small/tight knit program, research opportunities especially in ketamine use, really good for work-life balance, the program's very accommodating and the PD has your back, they have a great geri psych program i'd say, home call!!, Kingston's on the water
  • Cons: Child & adolescent exposure is lacking, high turnover rate on their acute psych floor, just lower volumes overall; psychotherapy is okay but you have to seek out opportunities if you want more niche subtypes

Ottawa

  • Pros: tight knit but still big enough center, good research opportunities, really solid child/adolescent and psychotherapy, probably the lead in health policy and really good in forensics, cool city 
  • Cons: were on probation recently but have fought well to make a comeback, the call can be busy, I think they're just adapting to CBD and haven't really updated their website yet.., bigger emphasis on independence it seems

McGill

  • Pros: from what I've heard tight knit group, incredible psychotherapy / transcultural psychiatry program, Montreal is amazing, idk much else about the program tbh

Dunno the rest of the french schools

Dalhousie

  • Pros: seem like a close group, ++ focus on work-life balance, protected academic half-days, good rural psych exposure, PGY-4 selective opportunity in additional psychotherapy modalities, coastal cities are pretty, lots of supervision (good or bad depending)
  • Cons: 10% of your training has to be outside of halifax, only 2 months of CL in PGY-4, i'm not sure what their research opportunities are like

Memorial

  • Pros: very kind and tight knit group, early on exposure to emerg psych and opportunity to do mobile crisis block in PGY1, can help neurosurgery at a locum, beautiful coast, exposure to ECT training (usually dont get this in other centers), great for rural 
  • Cons: not known for research, psychotherapy was lacking but has improved in recent years apparently, more so geared towards training in general psychiatry vs niche.  

Anyway hope this helps. And again, this is my perspective and other people may have different views / experiences that I don't know about! 

UBC: Pros - Dedicated research track that you can enter either through CaRMS or transfer. Diverse researchers + clinical subspecialties. New facilities in Fraser + Island. Cons - Island relatively new program (3y old?) and building capacity. Seems service heavy? 

Alberta: Pros - New PD seems invested in listening to resident FB. Strong Addictions Psychiatry. Happy residents as per social, said the program leadership very supportive. Netcare.  Cons - Call schedule/structure being reworked (trialing covering multiple sites), off service rotations include things like cardiology. I heard that vacation weeks can be stacked (eg. 4 weeks in a row).

Calgary: Pros - New PD. Strong culture of teaching/med ed incorporated in residency. Get to choose psychiatry preceptors. Netcare. Cons - Unclear impact of government relationship with MDs. Recent loss of psychiatry staff to other provinces. 

Toronto: Pros - robust clinically + research wise. Cons - have heard it described as a rat race/a lot of competition to make your name known. Can be hard to navigate ++opportunities clinically/research/advocacy. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/21/2021 at 10:25 PM, t2n1n4 said:

Calgary: Pros - New PD. Strong culture of teaching/med ed incorporated in residency. Get to choose psychiatry preceptors. Netcare. Cons - Unclear impact of government relationship with MDs. Recent loss of psychiatry staff to other provinces. 

To be fair—we haven’t lost all our psych staff in Calgary—several excellent preceptors have moved for various reasons. Most grads continue to stay in spite of current situation with govt. There are still many excellent preceptors in Calgary. 
 

there are also 2 PD (one is main PD, one is a new role of associate PD). Former PD remains involved as part of CBD.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 10 months later...
13 hours ago, Layla89 said:

Hi, I'm in the same boat and trying to decide between Western and Mcmaster psych... I would really appreciate any more input on which has better training, work life balance, opportunities to teach etc, thanks! 

McMaster is way better resourced than Western. Not sure whether Western has gotten back their accreditation after losing it yet, although I know they're working on it. McMaster has great call frequency (which becomes even less frequent as you become more senior), you can sign up to teach psychiatry clinical skills (paid!) to medical students, there are some excellent staff there and Hamilton is a great smaller city to live in, with Toronto just next door. I heard from some colleagues who interviewed at Western that residents did not seem happy, although take this with a grain of salt, because this is 2nd hand info. Western is just a very small program, with fewer resources and a recent loss of several staff that caused them to lose accreditation. Maybe others will have more insight about the program, that's just what I've been told.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you so much! I have my first interview today so this info is really helpful going into this season!! 

On 2/26/2022 at 10:41 PM, Persephone said:

McMaster is way better resourced than Western. Not sure whether Western has gotten back their accreditation after losing it yet, although I know they're working on it. McMaster has great call frequency (which becomes even less frequent as you become more senior), you can sign up to teach psychiatry clinical skills (paid!) to medical students, there are some excellent staff there and Hamilton is a great smaller city to live in, with Toronto just next door. I heard from some colleagues who interviewed at Western that residents did not seem happy, although take this with a grain of salt, because this is 2nd hand info. Western is just a very small program, with fewer resources and a recent loss of several staff that caused them to lose accreditation. Maybe others will have more insight about the program, that's just what I've been told.

 

On 2/26/2022 at 11:13 PM, ellorie said:

Been a long time since I was at Western (not since med school) but agree that Mac is much better resourced. Hamilton is likely also a better place to live.  Unless it's changed, call at Western and ED psych services in general have historically been a mess.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...